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So, I have to parallel class structures, Books and Makers. A Maker creates a book based on some file or something. We can simplify the definition of the basic Maker down to:

class Maker {
  type PF = (String, Book) => Book
  def apply(in: Source): Book = {
    mkMap(in, parseTop)
  }
  def mkMap(in: Source, top: PF) {
    var res = new Book
    in.getLines.foreach { ln => res = top(ln, res)
  }
  def parseTop(line: String, book: Book): Book = {
    // really makes a new Book object with changes based on the content of `line` and returns it
    book
  }
}

and Book looks something like this (not a case class because we want to be able to inherit it)

class Book(val title: String = "Untitled", val author: String = "No Author", val language: String = "English")
  def copy(title: String = this.title, author: String = this.author, language: String = this.language) = new Book(title, author, language)

Now, I'd like to extend this to make a SpecialMaker that makes SpecialBooks. A Special Book can be defined like this:

class SpecialBook(title: String = "Untitled", author: String = "No Author", language: String = "English", val specialness: Int = 9000) extends Book(title, author, language)
  def copy(title: String = this.title, author: String = this.author, language: String = this.language, specialness: Int = this.specialness) = new SpecialBook(title, author, language, specialness)

The only thing that changes in making a SpecialBook from a Book is that the parseTop function does some additional calculation to make the specialness factor, let's say like this:

class SpecialMaker {
   override def parseTop(line: String, book: SpecialBook): SpecialBook = {
     book.copy(specialness = book.specialness + 9000)
   }
}

Obviously, that code doesn't work because that parseTop would end up assigning a SpecialBook to a Book, among other problems. What's the best way to deal with the issue in Scala? Implicit conversions? (Could something to do with type parameters work?)

If there is a design pattern that deals with this, please let me know what it's called.

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1 Answer

up vote 0 down vote accepted

My approach, so you define the return type of parseTop by parameterizing the type of Maker:

trait Maker[B <: Book] {
  def parseTop(line: String, book: B): B
}
trait Book {
  val title: String
  val author: String
  val language: String
}

case class NonSpecialBook(title: String = "Untitled", author: String = "No Author", language: String = "English") extends Book

case class SpecialBook(title: String = "Untitled", author: String = "No Author", language: String = "English", val specialness: Int = 9000) extends Book

class NonSpecialMaker extends Maker[NonSpecialBook] {
  def parseTop(line: String, book: NonSpecialBook): NonSpecialBook = {
    book
  }
}

class SpecialMaker extends Maker[SpecialBook] {
  def parseTop(line: String, book: SpecialBook): SpecialBook = {
    book.copy(specialness = book.specialness + 9000)
  }
}

Do you need the parseTop method in SpecialMaker to hanle SpecialBooks´s or is it supposed to make books special? Is it possible to have a trait for books and all book types inherit from that trait?
Tell me, what´s missing to fit your needs.

EDIT: (due to comment)

You can supply an implicit BookBuilder :

trait Maker[B <: Book] {
  type PF = (String, B) => B
  def parseTop(line: String, book: B): B
  def mkMap(in: Source, top: PF)(implicit bookBuilder: {def apply(): B} ) {
    var res = bookBuilder()  
    // ...
  }
}

But that implicit BookBuilder must be implicitly in scope (or conveyed manually) everytime you use mkMap. I don´t know when you use mkMap.

share|improve this answer
    
It should handle SpecialBooks, however, I'm not sure how I'd make the mkMap method using the type parameter you're giving. For example, how would I make the initial value of res? –  Aaron Yodaiken Mar 15 '11 at 23:49
    
Why should this be a trait instead of a class? –  Aaron Yodaiken Mar 16 '11 at 0:29
    
Thia trait with vals is like an abstract class with these vals as constructor arguments. I used this to gain advantage of case classes. If you have a flat hierarchy (base trait and inheriting case classes) you can use all benefits of the case class, especially your copy method. Perhaps you want a deep hierachy with serveral book types inheriting from each other? –  Peter Schmitz Mar 16 '11 at 0:38
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