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I'm working with Python v2, and I'm trying to find out if you can tell if a word is in a string.

I have found some information about identifying if the word is in the string - using .find, but is there a way to do an IF statement. I would like to have something like the following:

if string.find(word):
    print 'success'

Thanks for any help.

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2  
You need to fix your syntax for the if statement. You need to read up on the result of "find". What does it return? After reading those two things, please clean up your example. –  S.Lott Mar 16 '11 at 1:11

5 Answers 5

up vote 71 down vote accepted

What is wrong with:

if word in mystring: 
   print 'success'
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15  
just as a caution, if you have a string "paratyphoid is bad" and you do a if "typhoid" in "paratyphoid is bad" you will get a true. –  David Nelson Dec 19 '12 at 17:52
    
Anyone knows how to overcome this problem? –  user2567857 Aug 19 at 9:36
    
@user2567857, regular expressions -- see Hugh Bothwell's answer. –  Mark Rajcok Aug 21 at 19:23
if 'seek' in 'those who seek shall find':
    print('Success!')

but keep in mind that this matches a sequence of characters, not necessarily a whole word - for example, 'word' in 'swordsmith' is True. If you only want to match whole words, you ought to use regular expressions:

import re

def findWholeWord(w):
    return re.compile(r'\b({0})\b'.format(w), flags=re.IGNORECASE).search

findWholeWord('seek')('those who seek shall find')    # -> <match object>
findWholeWord('word')('swordsmith')                   # -> None
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3  
+1 for the example code. Made me giggle! –  Wesley May 27 '13 at 20:12
    
Man! This is a pearl to find sequence of whole words in an another string. Thanks! –  Babu Aug 5 '13 at 8:48
    
You could also do if " seek " in "those who seek shall find", but would only work if the word has spaces around :P –  Deviljho Feb 27 at 19:20
    
Very elegant solution! –  Jonathan Jul 30 at 9:07

find returns an integer representing the index of where the search item was found. If it isn't found, it returns -1.

haystack = 'asdf'

haystack.find('a') # result: 0
haystack.find('s') # result: 1
haystack.find('g') # result: -1

if haystack.find(needle) >= 0:
  print 'Needle found.'
else:
  print 'Needle not found.'
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3  
+1 for the names choices. –  ypercube Mar 16 '11 at 1:20

This small function compares all search words in given text and if all search words find in text string returns length of search.

Also supports unicode string search.

#######################################
# find exact words
#######################################
def find_words(text, search):

   dText = {}
   dSearch = {}

   dText = text.split()
   dSearch = search.split()

   lenText = len(dText)
   lenSearch = len(dSearch)
   #print dText, lenText
   #print dSearch, lenSearch

   found_word = 0

   for text_word in dText:
      for search_word in dSearch:
         if hash(search_word) == hash(text_word):
            found_word += 1

   if found_word == lenSearch:
      return lenSearch
   else:
      return False

usage:

find_words('çelik güray ankara', 'güray ankara')
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Comparing hashes here is a bad idea. Not only two different words can have the same hash, but it's also slower than comparing the words directly (both of them have to be scanned completely, then hashed). You're also hashing the same search words over and over again. –  viraptor Sep 1 '13 at 19:42

if matching a sequence of characters is not sufficient and you need to match whole words, here is a simple function that gets the job done. it basically appends spaces where necessary and searches for that in the string:

def smart_find(haystack, needle):
    if haystack.startswith(needle+" "):
        return True
    if haystack.endswith(" "+needle):
        return True
    if haystack.find(" "+needle+" ") != -1:
        return True
    return False

this assumes that commas and other punctuations have already been stripped out.

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