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I have an XML structure similar to this:

<Header>
    <ElementA>
        <ElementB>
            <ElementC/>
            <ElementC/>
        </ElementB>
        <ElementB/>
    </ElementA>
</Header>

where the <ElementB> may have a sequence of <ElementC>, or may have none.

I can select <ElementA> nodes which have two <ElementB> by /Header/ElementA/ElementB/following-sibling::ElementB. I can select <ElementA> nodes which contain an <ElementB> node which contains an <ElementC> using /Header/ElementA/ElementB[ElementC].

But how do I select <ElementA> nodes which contain an <ElementB> which contains an <ElementC> followed by another <ElementB> containing another <ElementC>. Something like this:

<Header>
    <ElementA>
        <ElementB>
            <ElementC/>
            <ElementC/>
        </ElementB>
        <ElementB>
            <ElementC/>
            <ElementC/>
        </ElementB>
    </ElementA>
</Header>
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@John-Saunders: You could probably show some respect and select the best answer (I think it is obviously the one by @Robert-Rossney). –  Dimitre Novatchev Mar 20 '11 at 4:53
1  
@Dimitre: it would show the most respect if I accepted an answer after understanding it. I'm close, and I haven't forgotten. –  John Saunders Mar 21 '11 at 18:20
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3 Answers 3

up vote 6 down vote accepted

Note that you don't have to explicitly search the following-sibling axis. These two patterns will return the same result:

foo[bar/following-sibling::bar]

and

foo[bar[2]]

So your pattern can be as simple as:

/Header/ElementA[ElementB[ElementC][2]]

which will find ElementA elements that have two or more ElementB children, each of which has an ElementC child.

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Very nice. One quibble: You probably don't need the predicate on ElementC[2] because he didn't specify that more than one ElementC be present, even though his example shows more than one. –  lwburk Mar 16 '11 at 5:45
    
Ah, quite right. I'll fix that. –  Robert Rossney Mar 16 '11 at 6:40
1  
+1 Best answer. If there are at least two, then there is a second. All of this don't taking proximity into the count. –  user357812 Mar 16 '11 at 19:04
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I may just have answered my own question:

/Header/ElementA[ElementB[ElementC]/following-sibling::ElementB[ElementC]]

seems to work. The reason it didn't appear to work before is that my document, all 88,000 lines of it, had no occurrence of that pattern. This probably indicates a bug in the code that produces it, not a bug in my XPATH expression.

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@John-Saunders: You could probably show some respect and select the best answer (I think it is obviously the one by @Robert-Rossney). –  Dimitre Novatchev Mar 20 '11 at 4:52
add comment

A nested predicate gets the job done:

/Header/ElementA[ElementB[following-sibling::ElementB/ElementC]/ElementC]
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