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This is interesting. The attached very simple code gives nice 'background highlighted' text in Firefox, but displays no highlighting in IE7 (and possibly others, not yet tested).

The use of such inline elements is important because I'm using them in a grid to highlight important words etc.

Test.html

<html xmlns="http://www.w3.org/1999/xhtml">
<head>
    <title></title>
    <link rel="stylesheet" href="Test.css" type="text/css" />
</head>
<body>
This is <hlr>a test</hlr> of the <hlr>highlighting</hlr>
</body>
</html>

Test.css

/*RED Highlighted text.*/
hlr
{
    background-color: #FF5555;
    font-weight: bold;
    font-size:100%;
}

Bizarre! Any thoughts on how to remedy it?

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3 Answers 3

up vote 2 down vote accepted

hlr is invalid markup. Try this instead:

<html xmlns="http://www.w3.org/1999/xhtml">
<head>
    <title></title>
    <link rel="stylesheet" href="Test.css" type="text/css" />
</head>
<body>
This is <span class='hlr'>a test</span> of the <span class='hlr'>highlighting</span>
</body>
</html>

then:

/*RED Highlighted text.*/
.hlr
{
    background-color: #FF5555;
    font-weight: bold;
    font-size:100%;
}
share|improve this answer
    
Many thanks mate, that did the trick perfectly! A strange and interesting effect indeed. Much appreciated! –  Glinkot Mar 16 '11 at 7:12
    
@Glinkot why didn't you accept the answer if this worked for you??. –  Hussein Mar 16 '11 at 7:15
    
Am going to but it told me I had to wait 4 more minutes for some reason :) –  Glinkot Mar 16 '11 at 7:20
    
Glad to be of help anytime. –  Jhourlad Estrella Mar 16 '11 at 8:20

You need to specify the below XHTML doctype too..

<!DOCTYPE html PUBLIC "-//W3C//DTD XHTML 1.0 Transitional//EN"
"http://www.w3.org/TR/xhtml1/DTD/xhtml1-transitional.dtd">
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks for that. It didn't end up being a dependency but standards compliance is always a good scheme. –  Glinkot Mar 16 '11 at 7:12

There is no hlr element in HTML. Internet Explorer doesn't make elements it doesn't recognise available to it's CSS selector engine.

The solution is to write HTML, don't make up your own elements. You should probably be using <em> or <strong> instead, possibly with a class to distinguish them from other forms of emphasis.

You can also force new elements to be recognised by the selector engine with document.createElement('element_name'), but adding a JS dependancy isn't a great idea and doesn't resolve the issue that no browser will know what semantics to apply.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks for the comment David. That sounds like it would work though referring to a custom style via the class reference/span tag Jhourlad mentioned did work like a charm. Thanks for your response mate. –  Glinkot Mar 16 '11 at 7:11
    
I like this answer better than the accepted one. +10. –  Robin Maben Mar 16 '11 at 7:46
    
@conqenator: You hurt my feeling. Just kidding :D –  Jhourlad Estrella Mar 18 '11 at 6:27

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