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I am trying to use push_back on a vector of strings in C++. How can I push a single character on to the vector? Currently, I have tried the following, all without success:

  1. Initialized a string (tried to) with the character.

    string str(main_string[0]);
    vector_string.push_back(str);

  2. Tried to invoke strcpy and thus copy contents. Const-ness seems to get in the way.

    string str;
    strcpy(main_string[0], str.c_str());
    vector_string.push_back(str);

Any more suggestions/ideas are most welcome.

Edit: The error logs are as follows:

test_push.C: In function ‘void test_push(std::vector<std::basic_string<char, std::char_traits<char>, std::allocator<char> >, std::allocator<std::basic_string<char, std::char_traits<char>, std::allocator<char> > > >&, std::string)’:
test_push.C:50: error: no matching function for call to ‘std::basic_string<char, std::char_traits<char>, std::allocator<char> >::basic_string(char&)’
/usr/lib/gcc/i586-redhat-linux/4.4.1/../../../../include/c++/4.4.1/bits/basic_string.tcc:220: note: candidates are: std::basic_string<_CharT, _Traits, _Alloc>::basic_string(typename _Alloc::rebind<_CharT>::other::size_type, _CharT, const _Alloc&) [with _CharT = char, _Traits = std::char_traits<char>, _Alloc = std::allocator<char>]
/usr/lib/gcc/i586-redhat-linux/4.4.1/../../../../include/c++/4.4.1/bits/basic_string.tcc:213: note:                 std::basic_string<_CharT, _Traits, _Alloc>::basic_string(const _CharT*, const _Alloc&) [with _CharT = char, _Traits = std::char_traits<char>, _Alloc = std::allocator<char>] <near match>
/usr/lib/gcc/i586-redhat-linux/4.4.1/../../../../include/c++/4.4.1/bits/basic_string.tcc:206: note:                 std::basic_string<_CharT, _Traits, _Alloc>::basic_string(const _CharT*, typename _Alloc::rebind<_CharT>::other::size_type, const _Alloc&) [with _CharT = char, _Traits = std::char_traits<char>, _Alloc = std::allocator<char>]
/usr/lib/gcc/i586-redhat-linux/4.4.1/../../../../include/c++/4.4.1/bits/basic_string.tcc:194: note:                 std::basic_string<_CharT, _Traits, _Alloc>::basic_string(const std::basic_string<_CharT, _Traits, _Alloc>&, typename _Alloc::rebind<_CharT>::other::size_type, typename _Alloc::rebind<_CharT>::other::size_type, const _Alloc&) [with _CharT = char, _Traits = std::char_traits<char>, _Alloc = std::allocator<char>]
/usr/lib/gcc/i586-redhat-linux/4.4.1/../../../../include/c++/4.4.1/bits/basic_string.tcc:184: note:                 std::basic_string<_CharT, _Traits, _Alloc>::basic_string(const std::basic_string<_CharT, _Traits, _Alloc>&, typename _Alloc::rebind<_CharT>::other::size_type, typename _Alloc::rebind<_CharT>::other::size_type) [with _CharT = char, _Traits = std::char_traits<char>, _Alloc = std::allocator<char>]
/usr/lib/gcc/i586-redhat-linux/4.4.1/../../../../include/c++/4.4.1/bits/basic_string.tcc:170: note:                 std::basic_string<_CharT, _Traits, _Alloc>::basic_string(const std::basic_string<_CharT, _Traits, _Alloc>&) [with _CharT = char, _Traits = std::char_traits<char>, _Alloc = std::allocator<char>]
/usr/lib/gcc/i586-redhat-linux/4.4.1/../../../../include/c++/4.4.1/bits/basic_string.tcc:178: note:                 std::basic_string<_CharT, _Traits, _Alloc>::basic_string(const _Alloc&) [with _CharT = char, _Traits = std::char_traits<char>, _Alloc = std::allocator<char>]
/usr/lib/gcc/i586-redhat-linux/4.4.1/../../../../include/c++/4.4.1/bits/basic_string.h:2147: note:                 std::basic_string<_CharT, _Traits, _Alloc>::basic_string() [with _CharT = char, _Traits = std::char_traits<char>, _Alloc = std::allocator<char>]
test_push.C:61: error: conversion from ‘char’ to non-scalar type ‘std::string’ requested
test_push:90: error: no matching function for call to ‘std::basic_string<char, std::char_traits<char>, std::allocator<char> >::basic_string(char&)’
/usr/lib/gcc/i586-redhat-linux/4.4.1/../../../../include/c++/4.4.1/bits/basic_string.tcc:220: note: candidates are: std::basic_string<_CharT, _Traits, _Alloc>::basic_string(typename _Alloc::rebind<_CharT>::other::size_type, _CharT, const _Alloc&) [with _CharT = char, _Traits = std::char_traits<char>, _Alloc = std::allocator<char>]
/usr/lib/gcc/i586-redhat-linux/4.4.1/../../../../include/c++/4.4.1/bits/basic_string.tcc:213: note:                 std::basic_string<_CharT, _Traits, _Alloc>::basic_string(const _CharT*, const _Alloc&) [with _CharT = char, _Traits = std::char_traits<char>, _Alloc = std::allocator<char>] <near match>
/usr/lib/gcc/i586-redhat-linux/4.4.1/../../../../include/c++/4.4.1/bits/basic_string.tcc:206: note:                 std::basic_string<_CharT, _Traits, _Alloc>::basic_string(const _CharT*, typename _Alloc::rebind<_CharT>::other::size_type, const _Alloc&) [with _CharT = char, _Traits = std::char_traits<char>, _Alloc = std::allocator<char>]  

More info: In this function, either the entire string or just the first letter is pushed in to the vector based on its contents. So, in a way, I am looking for some function that converts a char into a C++ style std::string (to make it acceptable to a vector).

Thanks,
Sriram

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What are the errors you are actually getting? Also, in the second one, are you trying to copy str into main_string[0] or vice versa? –  quasiverse Mar 16 '11 at 8:16
    
string is in turn a vector of characters. Why do you want to create a vector with string ( but only one character)? –  aJ. Mar 16 '11 at 8:18
    
Actually your problem is, initializing a string with one character. –  ali_bahoo Mar 16 '11 at 8:20
    
@quasiverse: added more info. –  Sriram Mar 16 '11 at 8:25
    
@sad_man: yes. that is my problem –  Sriram Mar 16 '11 at 8:28
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3 Answers 3

up vote 2 down vote accepted

no need for strcpy for a single character.

string str ("x");
str[0] = main_string[0]; 
vector_string.push_back(str);
share|improve this answer
    
Or even just string str; str += main_string[0];. –  user168715 Mar 16 '11 at 8:22
    
@user168715: thanks! That did it. –  Sriram Mar 16 '11 at 8:27
    
or string str (main_string, 0, 1); There's a lot of ways to do this! –  Tim Mar 16 '11 at 8:29
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You can also initialize with one character like this.

string str(1,main_string[0]);  
vector_string.push_back(str);  
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You can add the character directly via an appropriate string constructor:

vector_string.push_back(string(1, main_string[0]));

EDIT: Removed alternate solution after realising it duplicates @Tim's.

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1  
+1, this is much neater than @Tim's solution IMHO –  Nim Mar 16 '11 at 8:28
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