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I am using the follwing pattern to do multiprocessing:

    for item in data:
        inQ.put(item)

    for i in xrange(nProcesses):
        inQ.put('STOP')
        multiprocessing.Process(target=worker, args=(inQ, outQ)).start()

    inQ.join()
    outQ.put('STOP')

    for result in iter(outQ.get, 'STOP'):
        # save result

Which works fine. But if I send a numpy array through the outQ, the 'STOP' does not end up in the end of outQ, causing my result fetching loop terminating to early.

Here is some code to reproduce the bahaviour.

import multiprocessing
import numpy as np

def worker(inQ, outQ):
    for i in iter(inQ.get, 'STOP'):
        result = np.random.rand(1,100)
        outQ.put(result)
        inQ.task_done()
    inQ.task_done() # for the 'STOP'

def main():
    nProcesses = 8
    data = range(1000)

    inQ = multiprocessing.JoinableQueue()
    outQ = multiprocessing.Queue()
    for item in data:
        inQ.put(item)

    for i in xrange(nProcesses):
        inQ.put('STOP')
        multiprocessing.Process(target=worker, args=(inQ, outQ)).start()

    inQ.join()
    print outQ.qsize()
    outQ.put('STOP')

    cnt = 0
    for result in iter(outQ.get, 'STOP'):
        cnt += 1
    print "got %d items" % cnt
    print outQ.qsize()

if __name__ == '__main__':
    main()

If you replace the result = np.random.rand(1,100) with something like result = i*i the code works as expected.

What is happening here? Am I doing something fundamentally wrong here? I would have expected the outQ.put() after the inQ.join() to do what I want, since the join() blocks until all processes have done all put()s.

On workaround working for me is doing the result fetching loop with while outQ.qsize() > 0, which works find. But I read qsize() is not reliable. Is it only unreliable while different processes are running? Would it be to secure for me to rely on qsize() after having done the inQ.join()?

I expect some people to propose to use multiprocessing.Pool.map(), but I'm getting pickle errors, when doing that with numpy arrays (ndarrays).

Thanks for having a look!

share|improve this question
    
Did you test it to see if plain old threading.Thread suffers the same issues? –  Nate Mar 16 '11 at 9:18
    
I was using threading first, but I used it to do tar.gz reading which is implemented in python, which means threading won't help because of the GIL. Using threading and Queue.Queue seems to work, yes. –  chuck Mar 16 '11 at 10:46

2 Answers 2

numpy arrays use rich comparisons. So a=='STOP' returns a numpy array, not a bool, and that numpy array cannot be coerced to a bool. Under the covers, iter(outQ.get, 'STOP') is doing just that comparison and probably treating the exception when it tries to convert the result to a bool as False. You will have to do a manual while loop, pull items from the queue, check if isinstance(item, basestring) before comparing it to 'STOP'.

while True:
    item = outQ.get()
    if isinstance(item, basestring) and item == 'STOP':
        break
    cnt += 1

Checking for qsize() will probably also work fine because no other process is adding to the queue after the input queue is joined.

share|improve this answer
    
Does it fix the problem for you? –  chuck Mar 16 '11 at 16:29
    
No, it looks like there is something else going on. Probably the time it takes to serialize the result items is interfering with the ability of the queues in the remote processes to push them into the main process. Thus you add 'STOP' to the queue in the main process before all the results actually come in. Try outQ.put([i]*1000) and you will see the same effect. Try "while not outQ.empty():" instead of using a 'STOP' sentinel. Avoid .qSize() because it does not work on all platforms. –  Robert Kern Mar 16 '11 at 18:15
    
You're right with the [i]*1000. I thought serialization would be finished, when the program does inQ.task_done(), why isn't that so? I tried empty() but it fails, too. Sometimes it is true where qsize() > 0. I don't get what's happening behind the scenes there. –  chuck Mar 17 '11 at 7:42

Since you know how many items to expect from outQ, another work-around would be to wait for that number of items explicitly:

import multiprocessing as mp
import numpy as np
import Queue

N=100

def worker(inQ, outQ):
    while True:
        i,item=inQ.get()
        result = np.random.rand(1,N)
        outQ.put((i,result))
        inQ.task_done()

def main():
    nProcesses = 8
    data = range(N)
    inQ = mp.JoinableQueue()
    outQ = mp.Queue()    

    for i,item in enumerate(data):
        inQ.put((i,item))

    for i in xrange(nProcesses):
        proc=mp.Process(target=worker, args=[inQ, outQ])
        proc.daemon=True
        proc.start()

    inQ.join()
    cnt=0
    for _ in range(N):
        result=outQ.get()
        print(result)
        cnt+=1
        print(cnt)      
    print('got {c} items'.format(c=cnt))

if __name__ == '__main__':
    main()
share|improve this answer
    
This does not really answer the question, but solves the problem. And oh my god, I should have discovered that so much earlier! Thank you very much! –  chuck Mar 17 '11 at 7:49
    
@unutbu: Did you actually use that module? It looks really messy to me. –  chuck Mar 22 '11 at 12:53
    
@chuck: I haven't had a need to use it for serious work yet, but the code above works, yes? What about the module seems messy to you? –  unutbu Mar 22 '11 at 13:01
    
There seem to be a lot of outcommented lines of code on the first glance. It seems to require Cython and I don't see anything documented like what I have to look out for while using it. Also the readme file seems to be damaged. Did you have the experience that it just works? –  chuck Mar 22 '11 at 13:25
    
@unutbu: It fails for 1000x10000 matrices, that's only 80 MB, I want to go at least up to 10GB. I guess the shared memory section is just not large enough? –  chuck Mar 22 '11 at 13:43

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