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I am having a file of above structure and it is name log.txt. Now I do

 cat log.txt | grep '[*]' 

there was no output then I did

 cat log.txt | grep '\[* \]' 

again there was no output but when I did

 cat log.txt | grep '\[.*\]'

then there was output how is this working?

UPTADE

I am basically trying to look for the time stamps in above log.

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This has nothing to do with bash, string-manipulation or sed. What output were you expecting for each? Which lines are you trying to extract from log.txt? –  Johnsyweb Mar 16 '11 at 9:52
1  
What are you actually trying to do? It's not possible to deduce this from your attempted commands. –  Erik Mar 16 '11 at 9:53
    
@Johnsyweb I expected the lines which contain time stamp in [ ] to come in the grep result.Try the last command on your system. –  Registered User Mar 16 '11 at 10:02
    
@Registered User so every line in your Apache access log? You'd be better using cat by itself. If you're looking for the timestamp in square brackets then you'll need a Regular Expression like grep '\[[0-9]\{2\}/[A-Za-z]\{3\}/[0-9]\{4\}\(:[0-9]\{2\}\)\{3\} +[0-9]\{4\}\]' log.txt –  Johnsyweb Mar 16 '11 at 10:13
    
@Johnsyweb now you got me I am trying to look for the time stamps. –  Registered User Mar 16 '11 at 10:25
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4 Answers

up vote 6 down vote accepted
cat log.txt | grep '[*]' 

This command line searches the file log.txt for lines that contain a * in them. Since none of the lines in your input have * you get nothing. Note that [..] in regex is called a character class which matches any of the character inside it.

cat log.txt | grep '\[* \]' 

This command line searches the file for lines that have zero or more of literal [ followed by a space and followed by a literal ]. Again you don't have any such lines. Here you've escaped the [ and ]. This makes them non-special. So they don't form a character class anymore but are treated literally.

cat log.txt | grep '\[.*\]'

This one searches for lines that have a [ followed by anything (.*) followed by a ]. Since you have such lines you get the output.

Finally

 cat file | grep pattern

is called useless use of cat and can be written as:

grep pattern file
share|improve this answer
    
I got your point now.I was actually not able to explain my question properly I basically wanted to grep the time stamps and for that I was using such things. –  Registered User Mar 16 '11 at 10:28
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grep uses a regular expression as a pattern. The one you wrote (last one) means

  • [ : the '[' character once
  • .* : any character (.) any times from 0 to infinity (*)
  • ] : the ']' character once

Writing \[*\] would mean "The '[' character any number of times and then the ']' character". As writing [*] wouldn't mean anything since [] is the marker for a group of characters. There is a short explanation of regular expressions in man grep and you may find much more online

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In regexes the point "." means "any character" and the star "*" means: match me if the character before me is present 0 or more times.
"[" and "]" are used to limit a class of characters.

So:

  1. "[*]" matches only a star
  2. "\[*\[" means take any '[' followed by a ']'
  3. "\[.*\]" take anything which starts with a '[' followed by any char, followed by a '\]'

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