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This a const member function, which allow me to get the minimum node of the tree:

BinarySearthTree* BinarySearchTree::min() const                                        
{                                                                                      
    // Return the minimum node (left-most node) value of the tree                      
    BinarySearchTree * next = (BinarySearchTree *) this;                               

    for (next ; next != NULL; next = next->pLeft)                                      
        if (next->pLeft == NULL)                                                       
            return next;                                                               
}

I have to cast down the const-ness of 'this' pointer when assigning it to 'next', but this actually rises the potential that I may modify the value of what 'this' points to? Rather than always remind myself not to modify whatever 'next' points to, is there a way to prevent it happening by a better designing of the function?

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2 Answers 2

up vote 3 down vote accepted

Make next const:

const BinarySearthTree* BinarySearchTree::min() const                                        
{                                                                                      
    // Return the minimum node (left-most node) value of the tree                      
    const BinarySearchTree *next;                               

    for (next = this; next != NULL; next = next->pLeft)                                      
        if (next->pLeft == NULL)                                                       
            return next;
    return NULL;                                                               
}
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I make the method const because I want it to work both on const and non-const object, and I want the result from a const object not modifiable and the result from a non-const object modifiable. If I declare the function return type also 'const', then it doesn't work on the case of non-const object. Or I should have two function separately? –  zhanwu Mar 16 '11 at 11:07
1  
Yes you can either provide 2 versions; one const and the other non-const, or just stick with a single non-const version (this would be my preference). –  trojanfoe Mar 16 '11 at 11:23
    
It's a common pattern to just provide the const version and the non-const version simply does a const_cast const_cast on the call and return from the non-const version. –  edA-qa mort-ora-y Mar 16 '11 at 12:57

If you don't want the contents to be modified, then you should make min() return a pointer to a const object.

Your next variable should also be a pointer to a const object, therefore.

Here is how I think your method should look:

const BinarySearchTree* BinarySearchTree::min() const
{
    // Return the minimum node (left-most node) value of the tree
    for (const BinarySearchTree* next = this; next != NULL; next = next->pLeft)
    {
        if (next->pLeft == NULL)
        {
            return next;
        }
    }
    return this;
}

Also, in C++, you should avoid C-style casts. The const_cast exists for this purpose:

BinarySearchTree* next = const_cast<BinarySearchTree*>(this);

But that is not necessary in this instance.

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