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I want to write a new override of Except extension method for IEnumerable which is able to take a comparer inline instead of using IEqualityComparer.

A, B are collections of a reference type..

Something like this:

A: [1, A], [2, A], [3, A]

B: [3, B], [4, B], [5, B]

C = A.Except(B, (a,b) => a.Id == b.Id);

C: [1, A], [2, A]

I wonder if you could help me with the code of the method.

public static class IEnumerableExntesion
    {
        public IEnumerable<T> Except<T>(this IEnumerable<T> source, 
                                        IEnumerable<T> second, 
                                        Func<T, T, bool> predicate)
        {

        }
    }

I was thinking of:

return source.Where (s => !second.Any(p => p.Id == s.Id));

But actually I couldn't convert it to a generic solution using the passed predicate!

Any help!

share|improve this question
    
You could use Predicate<T, T> instead of Func<T, T, bool> - don't ask me why it has its own delegate type... –  Massif Mar 16 '11 at 11:00
1  
actualy predicate was introduced in .net 2 , and func was introduced in 3.5 its more accurate to use func from now on since there is no different at all between both , i think you should use the new LINQ Types as msdn recommend that.. –  Stacker Mar 16 '11 at 11:03

4 Answers 4

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Do you need to do the comparison using a predicate or can you use a projection instead and compare the projected values? If so then you could use some sort of ExceptBy method:

var c = a.ExceptBy(b, x => x.Id);

var r = p.ExceptBy(q, x => x.Name, StringComparer.OrdinalIgnoreCase);

// ...

public static class EnumerableExtensions
{
    public static IEnumerable<TSource> ExceptBy<TSource, TKey>(
        this IEnumerable<TSource> first, IEnumerable<TSource> second,
        Func<TSource, TKey> keySelector,
        IEqualityComparer<TKey> keyComparer = null)
    {
        if (first == null) throw new ArgumentNullException("first");
        if (second == null) throw new ArgumentNullException("second");
        if (keySelector == null) throw new ArgumentNullException("keySelector");

        return first.ExceptByIterator(second, keySelector, keyComparer);
    }

    private static IEnumerable<TSource> ExceptByIterator<TSource, TKey>(
        this IEnumerable<TSource> first, IEnumerable<TSource> second,
        Func<TSource, TKey> keySelector, IEqualityComparer<TKey> keyComparer)
    {
        var keys = new HashSet<TKey>(second.Select(keySelector), keyComparer);

        foreach (TSource item in first)
        {
            if (keys.Add(keySelector(item)))
                yield return item;
        }
    }
}
share|improve this answer
    
Perfect, thanks. –  Homam Mar 16 '11 at 11:50
    
Will this give me any benefits if I used it with LINQ to SQL ? –  Homam Mar 16 '11 at 11:57
    
@John, I'm afraid not. A generic version of the Any query in your question should be exactly what you'd need (and I'd expect the LINQ-to-SQL provider to optimise that into performant SQL). Unfortunately, my expression tree/IQueryable skills aren't really up to that job! –  LukeH Mar 16 '11 at 12:26

This should work:

return source.Where(s => !second.Any(p => predicate(s, p))
share|improve this answer
    
Performance will be poor compared to the built-in Except implementation, but there's not really any other option if the OP needs to use a predicate rather than a projection. –  LukeH Mar 16 '11 at 11:23
    
@LukeH: No, the predicate was only a suggestion. Seems it's not the best one. –  Homam Mar 16 '11 at 11:55
return source.Where(s => !second.Any(p => predicate(p, s)));
share|improve this answer
    
Performance will be poor compared to the built-in Except implementation, but there's not really any other option if the OP needs to use a predicate rather than a projection. –  LukeH Mar 16 '11 at 11:23

I would instead use your passed Func<T,T,bool> to create a generic IEqualityComparer and pass it to regular Except:

public class PredicateEqualityComparer<T> : IEqualityComparer<T>
{
    private readonly Func<T, T, bool> _predicate;

    public PredicateEqualityComparer(Func<T, T, bool> predicate)
    {
        _predicate = predicate;
    }

    public bool Equals(T x, T y)
    {
        return _predicate(x, y);
    }

    public int GetHashCode(T x)
    {
        return 0;
    }
}

Your extension method:

public static class IEnumerableExntesion
{
    public IEnumerable<T> Except<T>(this IEnumerable<T> source, 
                                    IEnumerable<T> second, 
                                    Func<T, T, bool> predicate)
    {
        return source.Except(second, new PredicateEqualityComparer(predicate));
    }
}    

Please note that I have stub GetHashCode implementation, it would be better to implement it properly but you would have to pass another delegate for it.

share|improve this answer
3  
That GetHashCode implementation means that this probably won't perform any better than the other much simpler suggestions using Any. –  LukeH Mar 16 '11 at 11:06
    
What's wrong with using x.GetHashCode()? Then you rely on T to implement GetHashCode –  David Kemp Mar 16 '11 at 11:11
3  
@David: Because you are checking for equality by using an arbitrary predicate. The results of Equals and GetHashCode must be in sync with each other which means that GetHashCode somehow needs to know how the predicate works. –  LukeH Mar 16 '11 at 11:19
    
@Luke so, to be pendantically correct, you show have to pass in both an Equals and a GetHashCode deletegates? In which case you may as well implement IEqualityComparer<T>... –  David Kemp Mar 16 '11 at 11:37

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