Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I have a function that corrects capitalization for a list of unusually capitalized words:

var line = "some long string of text";
["AppleScript", "Bluetooth", "DivX", "FireWire", "GarageBand", 
 "iPhone", "iTunes", "iWeb", "iWork", "JavaScript", "jQuery", "MacBook", 
 "MySQL", "PowerBook", "PowerPoint", "QuickTime", "TextEdit", "TextMate",
 // ... 
 "Wi-Fi", "Xcode", "Xserve", "XMLHttpRequest"].forEach(function(name) {
      line = line.replace(RegExp(name, "gi"), name);
});

Now the problem I am facing is that most input strings will contain on average between 0 and 3 of these words. Obviously now I am doing dozens (and potentially hundreds; that array has an uncanny tendency to grow over time) of function calls which essentially do nothing.

How can I make this code faster and get rid of the unnecessary function calls?

Example input:

My iphone application has a user form under UIViewController. When I start application again some of my UIView changes its positions and sizes. (These UIViews depend on keyboard position) Somewhere is definitely my fault. I try to figure what is going on when application starts again from background and where the UIView changes can be done.

share|improve this question
    
the calls are not uneccessary are they? If you want to check capitalise each string then you'll need to check for each one... Just because it doesn't exist it doesn't mean the check wasn't necessary... –  Sam Holder Mar 16 '11 at 11:54
    
@Sam But is necessary over the whole input? Or could a smarter regexp be crafted that would do all the checks in one function call? –  Jakub Hampl Mar 16 '11 at 11:59
    
ok I see your point. –  Sam Holder Mar 16 '11 at 12:04

1 Answer 1

up vote 5 down vote accepted

You can build regexp containing all your words, capturing each word by enclosing it in parentheses. Using that in a replace will provide enough information to recover the original word in the replace function.

  function correct (text, words) {
    return text.replace (RegExp ('\\b(?:(' + words.join (')|(') + '))\\b', 'ig'), function (m) {
      for (var a = arguments.length - 2; a--;)
        if (arguments[a])
      return words[a-1] || m;
    });
  } 

  console.log (correct ("My iphone itunes divx firewire application has a user form under uiviewcontroller. When I start application again some of my uiview changes its positions and sizes. (These uiviews depend on keyboard position) Somewhere is definitely my fault. I try to figure what is going on when application starts again from background and where the uiview changes can be done.",
    ["AppleScript", "Bluetooth", "DivX", "FireWire", "GarageBand", 
 "iPhone", "iTunes", "iWeb", "iWork", "JavaScript", "jQuery", "MacBook", 
 "MySQL", "PowerBook", "PowerPoint", "QuickTime", "TextEdit", "TextMate",
 // ... 
 "UIViewController","UIView",
 "Wi-Fi", "Xcode", "Xserve", "XMLHttpRequest"]));
My iPhone iTunes DivX FireWire application has a user form under UIViewController. When I start application again some of my UIView changes its positions and sizes. (These UIViews depend on keyboard position) Somewhere is definitely my fault. I try to figure what is going on when application starts again from background and where the UIView changes can be done.

This turns out to be faster then the original code.

share|improve this answer
    
Now will this be faster then the code I have now? Why? –  Jakub Hampl Mar 16 '11 at 13:09
    
The number of function calls this makes is 2 +(number_of_words_replaced). The rest of heavy lifting is done by fast internal functions. You can eliminate the regexp build at each call if the words array is static –  HBP Mar 16 '11 at 13:44
1  
The regexp needs to be modified slightly because it then matches within words: RegExp('\\b(?:(' + words.join(')|(') + '))\\b', 'ig') does the trick. –  Jakub Hampl Mar 16 '11 at 14:31
    
You are correct, I tried but missed by a pair of parentheses ;-) –  HBP Mar 16 '11 at 14:33
    
I've edited the answer, hope you don't mind :) –  Jakub Hampl Mar 16 '11 at 14:53

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.