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I'm trying to get the basics down here of class definition and using a calculation

Here's the code

<?php

class calculator {
    var $number1 = 4;
    var $number2 = 5;

    function add ($a,$b){
        $c = $a + $b;
        print ("the sum of your numbers: $c");
        print ($c);
    }

}

$cal = new calculator;
$cal->add($number1,$number2);

?>

What appears in my browser is:

The sum of your numbers: 0

Why not the 9?

share|improve this question
    
Where are you defining $getal1 and $getal2? –  Michiel Pater Mar 16 '11 at 12:55
    
that was a translation mistake. getal means number in dutch. corrected now. Even with this correction the result is the same –  Immers Mar 16 '11 at 12:56
    
Your arguments being sent are $number1 and $number2. Are they numbers? –  alex Mar 16 '11 at 12:56
    
print ($c); is ambiguous. You have already printed $c in the previous line. –  Michiel Pater Mar 16 '11 at 13:06

3 Answers 3

up vote 2 down vote accepted

What are the values of $number1 and $number2 that you are passing in? $number1 and $number2 are not the same as $cal->number1 and $cal->number2.

You're defining two properties of an object, and passing two distinct, separate variables into the class's function. You basically have two pairs of numbers - one pair in the object, with values of 4 and 5, and one outside the function with no values (both 0) which you are then adding.

You could try this:

<?php
class calculator {
    private $number1 = 4;
    private $number2 = 5;

    function add ($a, $b){
        $c = $this->$a + $this->$b;
        print ("the sum of your numbers: $c");
        print ($c);
    }

}

$cal = new calculator;
$cal->add('number1', 'number2');

Or this:

<?php
class calculator {
    private $number1 = 4;
    private $number2 = 5;

    function add (){
        $c = $this->number1 + $this->number2;
        print ("the sum of your numbers: $c");
        print ($c);
    }

}

$cal = new calculator;
$cal->add();

Or this:

<?php
class calculator {
    function add ($a, $b){
        $c = $a + $b;
        print ("the sum of your numbers: $c");
        print ($c);
    }

}

$cal = new calculator;
$cal->add(4, 5);
share|improve this answer
    
god I'm really tired today. The values are 4 and 5 respectively. Even still I get this weird zero also with values assigned to the number1 and number2 variables. –  Immers Mar 16 '11 at 13:00
    
greaet examples, very clarifying! –  Immers Mar 16 '11 at 13:13
1  
I love Jack Daniels! :P –  alex Mar 16 '11 at 23:17
    
Now, that's a name I've not heard in a long time. A long time. –  Dave Child Mar 16 '11 at 23:24

You should either do

class calculator {
    //...
}
$number1 = 4;
$number2 = 5;
$cal = new calculator;
$cal->add($number1,$number2);

or

class calculator {
    var $number1 =4;
    var $number2 =5;
    //...
}
$cal = new calculator;
$cal->add($cal->number1,$cal->number2);
share|improve this answer

Your $number1 and $number2 are being declared inside the scope of the class.

However when you call $cal->add($number1, $number2) you are now outside of that scope, so those values are undefined.

share|improve this answer
    
yes that's exactly what I overlooked! thanks! –  Immers Mar 16 '11 at 13:14

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