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There is an entity type called product that is generated by entity framework. I have writen this query

    public IQueryable<Product> GetProducts(int categoryID)
    {
        return from p in db.Products
               where p.CategoryID== categoryID
               select new Product { Name = p.Name};
    }

The code below throws the following error : "The entity or complex type Shop.Product cannot be constructed in a LINQ to Entities query"

var products = productRepository.GetProducts(1).Tolist();

But when I use select p instead of select new Product { Name = p.Name}; it works correctly.

How can I preform a custom select section?

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5 Answers 5

up vote 123 down vote accepted

You cannot (and should not be able to) project onto a mapped entity. You can, however, project onto an annonymous type or onto a DTO:

public class ProductDTO
{
    public string Name { get; set; }
    // Other field you may need from the Product entity
}

And your method will return a List of DTO's.

public List<ProductDTO> GetProducts(int categoryID)
{
    return (from p in db.Products
            where p.CategoryID == categoryID
            select new ProductDTO { Name = p.Name }).ToList();
}
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31  
I don't understand why I should not be able to do this... This would be very usefull... –  Jonx Jul 22 '11 at 0:10
42  
Well, mapped entities in EF basically represent database tables. If you project onto a mapped entity, what you basically do is partially load an entity, which is not a valid state. EF won't have any clue how to e.g. handle an update of such an entity in the future (the default behaviour would be probably overwriting the non-loaded fields with nulls or whatever you'll have in your object). This would be a dangerous operation, since you would risk losing some of your data in the DB, therefore it is not allowed to partially load entities (or project onto mapped entities) in EF. –  Yakimych Jul 22 '11 at 8:11
7  
@Yakimych that makes sense except if you have some aggregate entity that you are generating/creating via a query and therefore are fully aware/intend to create a brand new entity that you will then manipulate and later add. In this case you either have to force run the query or push into a dto and back into an entity to add - which is frustrating –  Cargowire Aug 17 '11 at 17:04
6  
@Cargowire - I agree, that scenario exists, and it is frustrating when you know what you are doing but are not allowed to do it due to limitations. However, had this been allowed, there would be lots of frustrated developers complaining about their data getting lost when e.g. trying to save partially loaded entities. IMO, an error that blows up with a lot of noise (throwing an exception, etc) is better than behavior which can cause hidden bugs that are difficult to track down and explain (things kind of work nicely before you start noticing missing data). –  Yakimych Aug 17 '11 at 20:16
7  
D.T.O - Data Transfer Objects –  tkerwood Nov 15 '11 at 6:17

You can project into anonymous type, and then from it to model type

public IEnumerable<Product> GetProducts(int categoryID)
{
    return (from p in Context.Set<Product>()
            where p.CategoryID == categoryID
            select new { Name = p.Name }).ToList()
           .Select(x => new Product { Name = x.Name });
}
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1  
Very terse, I like it! –  statue Jul 3 '13 at 12:04
    
Heh, should have more upvotes –  Andrei Dvoynos Jul 11 '13 at 17:28
    
This is the cleanest solution when you don't need / don't care about state of the selected entity you want to project. –  Mário Meyrelles Aug 9 '13 at 14:44
1  
And when you dont care if you return IEnumerable or IQueryable ;). But still you get my upvote cause this solution works for me now. –  Michael Brennt Dec 12 '13 at 14:15
3  
technically, the projection to the model type is occurring outside the query, and I believe also requires an additional iteration through the list. I won't use this solution for my code, but it is solution for the question. uptick. –  1c1cle Jan 2 at 17:37

There is another way that I found works, you have to build a class that derives from your Product class and use that. For instance:

public class PseudoProduct : Product { }

public IQueryable<Product> GetProducts(int categoryID)
{
    return from p in db.Products
           where p.CategoryID== categoryID
           select new PseudoProduct() { Name = p.Name};
}

Not sure if this is "allowed", but it works.

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Clever! Tried this now and it works. I'm sure it will somehow burn me though. –  Daniel May 17 '13 at 5:28
    
BTW this does bite you if you try to persist the results of GetProducts() since EF cannot find the mapping for PseudoProduct e.g. "System.InvalidOperationException: Mapping and metadata information could not be found for EntityType 'blah.PseudoProduct'". –  sming Dec 24 '13 at 11:13
1  
So perfect that I added this to the .tt code generation file –  AndyClaw Jan 22 at 2:16
    
Does not seem to work in the latest EF. –  zespri Aug 4 at 9:31
    
Best answer, and the only one that answers within the parameters of the question. All other answers change the return type or prematurely execute the IQueryable and use linq to objects –  Ryan Dansie Oct 2 at 11:32

Here is one way to do this without declaring aditional class:

public List<Product> GetProducts(int categoryID)
{
    var query = from p in db.Products
            where p.CategoryID == categoryID
            select new { Name = p.Name };
    var products = query.ToList().Select(r => new Product
    {
        Name = r.Name;
    }).ToList();

    return products;
}

However, this is only to be used if you want to combine multiple entities in a single entity. The above functionality (simple product to product mapping) is done like this:

public List<Product> GetProducts(int categoryID)
{
    var query = from p in db.Products
            where p.CategoryID == categoryID
            select p;
    var products = query.ToList();

    return products;
}
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Another simple way :)

public IQueryable<Product> GetProducts(int categoryID)
{
    var productList = db.Products
        .Where(p => p.CategoryID == categoryID)
        .ToList()
        .Select(item => 
            new Product
            {
                Name = item.Name
            })
        .AsQueryable(); // actually it's not useful after "ToList()" :D

    return productList;
}
share|improve this answer
    
good point I just learned something IQueryable with your nice reply. It would have been nice though if you would have explained WHY it's not useful after a ToList() and the reason is that you can't use generic lists in a LINQ-to-SQL query. So if you know you're always gonna push the results into another query by the caller then certainly makes sense to be IQueryable. But if not...if you are gonna use it as a generic list after, then use the ToList() inside the method so you aren't doing a ToList() on the IQueryable each and every call to this method. –  CoffeeAddict Jan 26 '12 at 20:57
    
You totally alright my friend.I just imitate the question method signature, because of that I convert it to a Query-able... ;) –  Soren Mar 12 '12 at 21:34

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