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I have a question concerning java and file input/output. for an specific task, i have to transfer a file (excel to be precise) while it's opened. imagine following scenario:

An excel file is opened and used by one user. From time to time the file is saved manually by the user. Now i want to write a java programm which reads the file and transfer it over an socket every 30 sec. No problem so far. My question: what happens if the user saves the document in the exact moment my program wants to read the file. Could this cause any troubles?

Don't know if it matters, but im using an BufferedInputStream to read the file.

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ok thanks for the fast answers. sorry i forgot to mention the os, it will be windows xp and newer. if the file is locked in the moment of writing, that wouldn't be a problem, my program ignores that, and wait another 30 sec to read. also a truncated file wouldn't be a problem imho, my server with apache poi wouln't read it. only thing that shouldn't happen is altering/crashing the original excel file with its data. but that couldn't happen if i only read or? –  Moe Mar 16 '11 at 14:12

3 Answers 3

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My question: what happens if the user saves the document in the exact moment my program wants to read the file. Could this cause any troubles?

Yes.

One or more of the following things could happen depending on your platform, and the way that the Excel file is saved.

  • If Excel uses locking, then either Excel or the program trying to read the file could get an error saying that the file is in use.

  • If Excel does a rewrite in place and doesn't lock the file, then the program trying to read the file could see a truncated Excel file.

  • If Excel writes a new file and renames it, the program trying to read the file could see a state where the file apparently does not exist.

  • It could work.

In short, the program doing the reading needs to very defensive ...


Don't know if it matters, but im using an BufferedInputStream to read the file.

That's irrelevant I think.

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AFaik, the behaviour will depend on your underlying filesystem / operating system. A unix system typically keep an "un-named" copy of the file being read and starts creating a new file for the "being written" new copy, using inode trickery. An old Windows system would likely reply that the file cannot be written to because it is locked. I don't know about modern Windows systems.

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what you can do i think is to alway check the state of the file before you do anything about it. like what have been said in some earlier posts, it all depends on the underlying platform, and you should employ a lot of defensive programming...

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