Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free.

I am getting this error:

'CTest.A.A()' is inaccessible due to its protection level.

when compiling this code:

public class A
{
    private A()
    {
    }
}

public class B : A
{
    public void SayHello()
    {
        Console.WriteLine("Hello");
    }
}

Can anyone explain why?

share|improve this question

5 Answers 5

up vote 13 down vote accepted

Because the default constructor for A is private, try protected A() {} as the constructor.

Class B automatically calls the default constructor of A, if that is inaccessible to B or there is no default constructor (if you have constructor protected A(string s) {}) B can not be instantiated correctly.

The compiler automatically generates the following default constructor in B

public B() : base()
{
}

Where base() is the actual call to the default constructor of A.

share|improve this answer
    
Not quite the whole story though. Even if B is an abstract class you will get the same compile error. An abstract class has no constructor, but the compiler still enforces the rule, since a class C derived from B would have the same issue. (Note that this is the case even if there is no class derived from C.) –  yoyo Jul 9 '14 at 8:46

The constructor on class B (which is added by the compiler) needs to call the default (no-args) constructor on A, however the default constructor is marked as private, which means it can only be called inside A, hence the error.

Change the constructor on A to protected or public, or internal if B is in the same assembly.

share|improve this answer

The constructor for A is private, it cannot be accessed from outside. If you want to create an instance of A from outside, make the constructor public or protected.

share|improve this answer

Change private A() to public A() and you are good to go.

share|improve this answer

It's because A's constructor is private, but B's constructor is public. When you construct B (which constructs A as well) there is no way to access A's private constructor.

share|improve this answer
3  
What does B's constructor being public have to do with anything? –  Armen Tsirunyan Mar 16 '11 at 13:36
    
how would you instantiate B with private constructor? I just pointed out that B can be instantiated –  Robert Mar 16 '11 at 13:39
    
You can use a static factory method on B that calls the private constructor of B (that needs to call a public or protected constructor of A) –  Albin Sunnanbo Mar 16 '11 at 13:41
    
Who says anything about instantiation? The compiler error has nothing to do with B's ctor being public –  Armen Tsirunyan Mar 16 '11 at 13:50

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.