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this might be a silly question but...

Refactoring my code, I came up with a question I could not find any answer to:

assuming I have an object MyDumyObject containing String properties Foo and Bar

assuming I also have a collection of MyDumyObject called MyDumyCollection

is

foreach(MyDumyObject obj in MyDumyCollection)
{
    obj.Foo = "fooooooooo";
    obj.Bar = "baaaaaaaar";
}

equivalent to

foreach(MyDumyObject obj in MyDumyCollection)
{
    obj.Foo = "fooooooooo";
}

foreach(MyDumyObject obj in MyDumyCollection)
{
    obj.Bar = "baaaaaaaar";
}

?

I'm guessing: no but I have been deceived by C# and the way the C# compiler works more than once previously, so I'm careful with my assumptions now, and I'd be glad for a confirmation or refutation.

subsidiary question:

is

foreach(MyDumyObject obj in MyDumyCollection)
{
    obj.Foo = "fooooooooo";

    // ....

    obj.Foo = "foooooooooooooooooooooooo";
}

equivalent to

foreach(MyDumyObject obj in MyDumyCollection)
{
    obj.Foo = "fooooooooo";
}

// ....

foreach(MyDumyObject obj in MyDumyCollection)
{
    obj.Foo = "foooooooooooooooooooooooo";
}

?

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3 Answers

up vote 10 down vote accepted

are two loops more costly than one loop

Assuming the code that is within the loop statement is much more costly than the loop overhead itself it shouldn't matter - but in your case the overhead seems much more significant, so yes two loops are more costly. For each of those loops an Enumerator has to be generated and you have to advance to the next item in your enumeration once for each item in the collection (even though for lists this is a simple indexed access [] ) - with two loops you have this overhead twice.

Also keep in mind there are enumerations where you cannot iterate over twice because the data is consumed when you iterate, i.e. data received from a network, but these cases are far and in between - for in-memory collections (like List<T>) this usually does not apply.

Generally go for readability vs. micro-optimization - I don't really think the loop overhead matters much one way or the other.

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3  
That really depends. Most collections are pretty small in my experience, but if there were millions of items then I'd much rather iterate once than twice. Besides I think the single loop is more readable, not less. –  LukeH Mar 16 '11 at 15:21
    
@LukeH: I fully agree –  BrokenGlass Mar 16 '11 at 15:23
    
This answer my question perfectly, thanks. I do not have a lot of items (around 1000 at most), so no big overhead, and the code inside a loop is rather costly, so I'll say in my case, one or two loops won't make a difference. I'll settle for readability :) –  David Mar 16 '11 at 15:32
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You may as well ask does a loop have any overhead at all. It may not have much overhead but if it has any at all then two loops would have more.

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On your subsidiary question, it really boils down to what happens in the ellipsis. If you reference the value of obj.Foo - or of the Foo of any obj in YourDummyCollection - between the points where you set it, then the two-loop scenario could produce different results. Say, for example, you had a call inside the loop that looped over the collection yet again, adding the lengths of all the Foos. The last time through the loop, it would have all "foooooooooooooooooooooooo" except for one - but if you separate the second assignment into its own loop, it would be all "fooooooooo". Quite different.

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