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If I have the following

class A
    {
    public:
        int stuff;
            void helper(B temp, int d); //what about here? I'm getting a 'B' has not been declared error here.
    private:
        class B 
        {
        public:
            int stuffer;
        private:
            int x;
        };
    }:

Whats the correct way to refer to class 2 in my implementation file? Would it be 1::2::someMethod? Or 2::someMethod?

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3  
Did you try either way? –  Arkadiy Mar 16 '11 at 15:36
2  
1 and 2 are not valid class names. –  Adam Rosenfield Mar 16 '11 at 15:36
    
Ya I tried but I have way too many other errors so I'm not sure what traces back to what yet, but I just wanted to know the "official" ruling on this.. –  moby Mar 16 '11 at 15:45
    
Note: Class B is private and can not be accessed from outside the class. Thus exposing a method 'helper' that uses a B is not going to help. –  Loki Astari Mar 16 '11 at 15:55

4 Answers 4

up vote 1 down vote accepted

First of all, class name cannot start with integer. So renaming them:

 class A
 {
    public:
        int stuff;
    private:
        class B 
        {
        public:
            int stuffer;
        private:
            int x;
        };
  };

Second, since the nested class B is in the private section, so you cannot access it from outside the scope of class A. B is accessible to A only. And the syntax of declaring an object of type B would be B bObj; in the scope of A.

Now you should try yourself first, before asking futher questions!


As for your edit (the added question): it's not compiling because by the time the compiler sees B temp, it has not yet seen the definition of B, that is why it says B is not declared!

The fix is very simple. Declare B before it's used, something like this:

class A
{
private:
        class B 
        {
        public:
            int stuffer;
        private:
            int x;
        };
    public:
        int stuff;
        void helper(B temp, int d);

 }; //<--- this is also fixed. your code has 'colon', instead semi-colon!

Also read the comment at the end of the class!

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unless there is a friend :) –  Arkadiy Mar 16 '11 at 15:38
    
Whats oustide mean? Can I access it in my A.cpp file? –  moby Mar 16 '11 at 15:40
    
@bitmoe: Try, Experiment and Know! –  Nawaz Mar 16 '11 at 15:42
    
@Nawaz can you see edit please –  moby Mar 16 '11 at 15:50
    
@bitmoe: See my answer again! –  Nawaz Mar 16 '11 at 15:56

Assuming that 1 and 2 refer to REAL class names, 1::2::methodName just like any other nested scoping.

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Please see edits for one more question –  moby Mar 16 '11 at 15:43

If you're inside a method of class 1, you can use 2::somemethod. In other places, use 1::2::somemethod. "Inside" includes method argument declarations in method implementations of class 1, but not return value declarations for method implementations of class 1.

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It depends on which scope level you're at. Inside a member function for class 1, it would be class_2::someMethod. At file scope, it would be class_1::class_2::someMethod. It's always correct to fully qualify a function or variable name like that, but sometimes it's more typing than is strictly necessary. In general, you need the scope resolution operator :: when the compiler can't figure out on its own what you're referring to.

In practice, the best way to find out is try it and see what happens. If the compiler gives you an error, throw the class name in front of it and try again.

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