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I'd like to set the foreground (text) color to all of my elements You'd think this would be easy, but it's not...

<Window Foreground="Red">
   <Label Content="Test"/>
   <Label Content="Test"/>
   <CheckBox Content="Checkbox"/>
</Window>

This has no effect... The only way I can get this to work is if I set the Foreground property on each one of the elements specifically. And this gets annoying if you have hundreds of elements, etc.

Maybe you know of a way?

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4 Answers 4

This is because such controls as Label and CheckBox override the Foreground property in their styles.

Below is an example a typical logical tree of elements that shows how the value specified on the Window level travels down the tree:

Window (Red [Local]) 
  -> Grid (Red [Inherited]) 
     -> ListBox (Red [Inherited]) 
        -> ListBoxItem (Red [Inherited]) 
           -> StackPanel (Red [Inherited]) 
              -> Label (Black [Style])
                 -> TextBlock (Black [Inherited])
              -> TextBlock (Red [Inherited])

In square brackets the source of the value is shown.

As you can see the inheritance breaks on the Label itself because it has the Foreground property set in its default style:

<Style x:Key="{x:Type Label}"
       TargetType="{x:Type Label}">
    <Setter Property="Foreground"
            Value="{DynamicResource {x:Static SystemColors.ControlTextBrushKey}}"/>
    ...
</Style>

As a workaround for this we can use the following trick. Define the default style for such controls (as Label) in the application (in App.xaml or in the Window inself). And in that default style override the Foreground property to set a relative source binding to the nearest ancestor of the control that still has the desired value:

<Style TargetType="{x:Type Label}">
    <Setter Property="Foreground"
            Value="{Binding RelativeSource={RelativeSource AncestorType={x:Type FrameworkElement}}, Path=(TextElement.Foreground)}"/>
</Style>

<Style TargetType="{x:Type CheckBox}">
    <Setter Property="Foreground"
            Value="{Binding RelativeSource={RelativeSource AncestorType={x:Type FrameworkElement}}, Path=(TextElement.Foreground)}"/>
</Style>

After that our tree will look like this:

Window (Red [Local]) 
  -> Grid (Red [Inherited]) 
     -> ListBox (Red [Inherited]) 
        -> ListBoxItem (Red [Inherited]) 
           -> StackPanel (Red [Inherited]) 
              -> Label (Red [Binding to StackPanel.(TextElement.Foreground)])
                 -> TextBlock (Red [Inherited])
              -> TextBlock (Red [Inherited])

As you can see, our binding restores the inheritance.

Such styles need to be defined for each element that overrides the Foreground property in its style. As @Duane suggested, to not duplicate the binding in each style the BasedOn capability can be used:

<Style x:Key="ForegroundInheritanceFixStyle"
       TargetType="Control">
    <Setter Property="Foreground"
            Value="{Binding RelativeSource={RelativeSource AncestorType={x:Type FrameworkElement}}, Path=(TextElement.Foreground)}"/>
</Style>

<Style TargetType="{x:Type Label}"
       BasedOn="{StaticResource ForegroundInheritanceFixStyle}">
</Style>

<Style TargetType="{x:Type CheckBox}"
       BasedOn="{StaticResource ForegroundInheritanceFixStyle}">
</Style>

Hope this helps.

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This will work nice enough when you have only one parent in the Visual Tree, but typically the Labels and Checkboxes will be embedded some levels deeper. –  Dabblernl Mar 16 '11 at 18:02
    
@Dabblernl - No, this will work always. The only thing it does is reverts back inheritance broken by the the style setter on the default style of the elements. For example, if you have a tree like this: Window -> Grid -> ListBox -> ListBoxItem -> StackPanel -> Label. If you set the Foreground property on the Window the value will be inherited by the the Label like this: Window (Red) -> Grid (Red [inherited]) -> ListBox (Red [inherited]) -> ListBoxItem (Red [inherited]) -> StackPanel (Red [inherited]) -> Label (Red [Binding to StackPanel.(TextElement.Foreground)]). –  Pavlo Glazkov Mar 16 '11 at 18:51

Sadly the way the styles work in WPF you can't create a generic style on a parent class and have it apply to the sub-classed control.

One thing you can do is create a base style that targets a base type with the property you want to set (like ContentControl) and then create a specific style for each control that is BasedOn that style. Here is an example:

<Window>
    <Window.Resources>

        <Style x:Key="BaseContentControlStyle" TargetType="{x:Type ContentControl}">
            <Setter Property="Foreground" Value="Red" />
        </Style>

        <Style TargetType="{x:Type Label}" BasedOn="{StaticResource BaseContentControlStyle}" />

        <Style TargetType="{x:Type CheckBox}" BasedOn="{StaticResource BaseContentControlStyle}" />

    </Window.Resources>

    <StackPanel>
        <Label Content="Test"/>
        <Label Content="Test"/>
        <CheckBox Content="Checkbox"/>
    </StackPanel>   
</Window>

Hope this helps.

EDIT:

You could use Pavlo's method below for restoring inheritance and make it a little easier to use like so:

<Window.Resources>

    <Style x:Key="BaseContentControlStyle" TargetType="{x:Type Control}">
        <Setter Property="Foreground" Value="{Binding RelativeSource={RelativeSource AncestorType={x:Type FrameworkElement}}, Path=(TextElement.Foreground)}"/>
    </Style>

    <Style TargetType="{x:Type Label}" BasedOn="{StaticResource BaseContentControlStyle}" />

    <Style TargetType="{x:Type CheckBox}" BasedOn="{StaticResource BaseContentControlStyle}" />

</Window.Resources>

At least then you don't have to copy the same setter code everywhere (BTW, I think the TextBlock inherits by default; no default style with overrides).

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+1 'TargetType="{x:Type ContentControl}' will also work with a textblock –  biju Mar 16 '11 at 16:34
    
+1 The most concise answer. Welcome to Stackoverflow! –  Dabblernl Mar 16 '11 at 16:42
    
This won't fix the inheritance problem. For example, if you want to specify default color on the Window level, and another one for a specific area inside the window. In this case you will have to define all the styles again at that level. –  Pavlo Glazkov Mar 16 '11 at 16:43
1  
Sorry, but this also won't work with TextBlock (if that is a requirement - 'hundreds of elements' implies it might be). TextBlock inherits FrameworkElement, whereas Label inherits ContentControl inherits Control inherits FrameworkElement. –  kiwipom Mar 16 '11 at 16:55
    
@ Pavlo Glazov : This question unearths two problems: 1: Label and CheckBox do not inherit their Foreground property from their base classes, so setting the Foreground in a style targeted at such an ancester is pointless. 2: It would be nice if you could specify that Controls can copy some of their properties from their parents in the Visual Tree. You give a possible solution for that in your own answer, but it is not very satisfacotory IMHO. –  Dabblernl Mar 16 '11 at 18:08

Yes it is not easy in wpf.But you can try like this

<StackPanel>
        <StackPanel.Resources>
            <Style x:Key="CommonStyle">
                <Setter Property="TextElement.Foreground" Value="Red" />
            </Style>
        </StackPanel.Resources>
        <Label Content="Test" Style="{StaticResource CommonStyle}" />
        <Label Content="Test" Style="{StaticResource CommonStyle}"/>
        <CheckBox Content="Checkbox" Style="{StaticResource CommonStyle}"/>

    </StackPanel>
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2  
That doesn't really achieve much because you need to set the style everywhere –  MikeKulls Aug 10 '11 at 5:51

It would certainly be annoying if you have hundreds of individual elements to configure, but I'm assuming you won't have hundreds of different types of elements.

That being the case, one thing you can do is create Styles for your types, and set the foreground colors there.

Ideally, this might be in a ResourceDictionary and each Style would reference a common foreground Color, like

<ResourceDictionary xmlns="http://schemas.microsoft.com/winfx/2006/xaml/presentation"
                xmlns:x="http://schemas.microsoft.com/winfx/2006/xaml">

    <SolidColorBrush x:Key="appForegroundColor" Color="Red" />

    <Style TargetType="{x:Type TextBlock}">
        <Setter Property="Foreground" Value="{StaticResource appForegroundColor}" />
    </Style>

    <!-- Create styles for Element Types here -->

</ResourceDictionary>

Then you apply this resource dictionary to the Window(s) that need it, like:

<Window ...>
    <Window.Resources>
        <ResourceDictionary>
            <ResourceDictionary.MergedDictionaries>
                <ResourceDictionary Source="Dictionary1.xaml" />
            </ResourceDictionary.MergedDictionaries>
        </ResourceDictionary>
    </Window.Resources>

    <Grid>
        <TextBlock Text="Foo" />
    </Grid>
</Window>
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Pretty sure this would work... wonder why the downvote? –  kiwipom Mar 17 '11 at 7:55

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