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Is there a way to print variables scope from context where exception happens?

For example:

def f():
    a = 1
    b = 2
    1/0

try:
    f()
except:
    pass # here I want to print something like "{'a': 1, 'b': 2}"
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What does "to print variables scope" mean? Could you give an example? –  Sven Marnach Mar 16 '11 at 15:53
1  
That's what the except clause is for. Please provide some code to illustrate why you're not printing things in the except clause. –  S.Lott Mar 16 '11 at 15:55
    
I mean to print all variables in the scope of exception. –  Soid Mar 16 '11 at 15:57
    
I've added an example in description –  Soid Mar 16 '11 at 16:00
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3 Answers

up vote 8 down vote accepted

You can use the function sys.exc_info() to get the last exception that occurred in the current thread in you except clause. This will be a tuple of exception type, exception instance and traceback. The traceback is a linked list of frame. This is what is used to print the backtrace by the interpreter. It does contains the local dictionnary.

So you can do:

import sys

def f():
    a = 1
    b = 2
    1/0

try:
    f()
except:
    exc_type, exc_value, tb = sys.exc_info()
    if tb is not None:
        prev = tb
        curr = tb.tb_next
        while curr is not None:
            prev = curr
            curr = curr.tb_next
        print prev.tb_frame.f_locals
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You have to first extract traceback, in your example something like this would print it:

except:
    print sys.exc_traceback.tb_next.tb_frame.f_locals

I'm not sure about the tb_next, I would guess you have to go through the complete traceback, so something like this (untested):

except:
    tb_last = sys.exc_traceback
    while tb_last.tb_next:
        tb_last = tb_last.tb_next
    print tb_last.tb_frame.f_locals
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Perhaps you're looking for locals() and globals()?

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I saw it before my question but it can't get context variables of exception. I don't know how to use it in example above. –  Soid Mar 16 '11 at 16:03
    
Yes, you're correct. In your example code, you wouldn't be able to get the context of the function f using these functions. –  Mark Hildreth Mar 16 '11 at 16:07
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