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I have a server program that connects to another program via a given socket, and in certain cases I need to close the connection and almost immediately re-open it on the same socket. This by and large works, except that I have to wait exactly one minute for the socket to reset. In the meantime, netstat indicates that the server sees the socket in FIN_WAIT2 and the client sees it as CLOSE_WAIT. I'm already using SO_REUSEADDR, which I thought would prevent the wait, but that isn't doing the trick. Setting SO_LINGER to zero also does not help. What else can I do to resolve this?

Here are the relevant code snippets:

SetUpSocket()
{
   // Set up the socket and listen for a connection from the exelerate client.
   // Open a TCP/IP socket.
   m_baseSock = socket(PF_INET, SOCK_STREAM, IPPROTO_IP);
   if (m_baseSock < 0)
   {
      return XERROR;
   }

   // Set the socket options to reuse local addresses.
   int flag = 1;
   if (setsockopt(m_baseSock, SOL_SOCKET, SO_REUSEADDR, &flag, sizeof(flag)) == -1)
   {
      return XERROR;
   }

   // Set the socket options to prevent lingering after closing the socket.
   //~ linger li = {1,0};
   //~ if (setsockopt(m_baseSock, SOL_SOCKET, SO_LINGER, &li, sizeof(li)) == -1)
   //~ {
      //~ return XERROR;
   //~ }

   // Bind the socket to the address of the current host and our given port.
   struct sockaddr_in addr;
   memset(&addr, 0, sizeof(addr));
   addr.sin_family = AF_INET;
   addr.sin_addr.s_addr = INADDR_ANY;
   addr.sin_port = htons(m_port);
   if (bind(m_baseSock, (struct sockaddr*)&addr, sizeof(addr)) != 0)
   {
      return XERROR;
   }

   // Tell the socket to listen for a connection from client.
   if (listen(m_baseSock, 4) != 0)
   {
      return XERROR;
   }
   return XSUCCESS;
}

ConnectSocket()
{
   // Add the socket to a file descriptor set.
   fd_set readfds;
   FD_ZERO(&readfds);
   FD_SET(m_baseSock, &readfds);

   // Set timeout to ten seconds. Plenty of time.
   struct timeval timeout;
   timeout.tv_sec = 10;
   timeout.tv_usec = 0;

   // Check to see if the socket is ready for reading.
   int numReady = select(m_baseSock + 1, &readfds, NULL, NULL, &timeout);
   if (numReady > 0)
   {
      int flags = fcntl(m_baseSock, F_GETFL, 0);
      fcntl(m_baseSock, flags | O_NONBLOCK, 1);

      // Wait for a connection attempt from the client. Do not block - we shouldn't
      // need to since we just selected.
      m_connectedSock = accept(m_baseSock, NULL, NULL);
      if (m_connectedSock > 0)
      {
         m_failedSend = false;
         m_logout = false;

         // Spawn a thread to accept commands from client.
         CreateThread(&m_controlThread, ControlThread, (void *)&m_connectedSock);

         return XSUCCESS;
      }
   }
   return XERROR;
}

ControlThread(void *arg)
{
   // Get the socket from the argument.
   socket sock = *((socket*)arg);

   while (true)
   {
      // Add the socket to a file descriptor set.
      fd_set readfds;
      FD_ZERO(&readfds);
      FD_SET(sock, &readfds);

      // Set timeout to ten seconds. Plenty of time.
      struct timeval timeout;
      timeout.tv_sec = 10;
      timeout.tv_usec = 0;

      // Check if there is any readable data on the socket.
      int num_ready = select(sock + 1, &readfds, NULL, NULL, &timeout);
      if (num_ready < 0)
      {
         return NULL;
      }

      // If there is data, read it.
      else if (num_ready > 0)
      {
         // Check the read buffer.
         xuint8 buf[128];
         ssize_t size_read = recv(sock, buf, sizeof(buf));
         if (size_read > 0)
         {
            // Get the message out of the buffer.
            char msg = *buf;
            if (msg == CONNECTED)
            {
               // Do some things...
            }
            // If we get the log-out message, log out.
            else if (msg == LOGOUT)
            {
               return NULL;
            }
         }
      }
   } // while
   return NULL;
}

~Server()
{
   // Close the sockets.
   if (m_baseSock != SOCKET_ERROR)
   {
      close(m_baseSock);
      m_baseSock = SOCKET_ERROR;
   }
   if (m_connectedSock != SOCKET_ERROR)
   {
      close(m_connectedSock);
      m_connectedSock = SOCKET_ERROR;
   }
}

SOCKET_ERROR is equal to -1. The server object gets destroyed, at which point the connection should close, and then recreated, at which point the SetUpSocket() and ConnectSocket() routines are called.

So why do I have to wait a minute for the socket to clear? Any ideas would be appreaciated.

EDIT: Following the advice of my first posters, I found a way to get the client to close the socket from its end. Something still isn't right, though. Now, netstat shows the socket from the server's perspective in TIME_WAIT and there is no entry from the client's perspective. All I've got is:

tcp 0 0 localhost.localdomain:19876 localhost.localdomain:54598 TIME_WAIT

and nothing from the other way around. The server and client still require exactly a minute for the TIME_WAIT to clear to be able to reconnect. Now what's wrong - is using close() on the client's socket incorrect?

EDIT 2: Now, if I force the client to reconnect, it will immediately - but if I just let it do its own thing, it waits the full minute for the TIME_WAIT to clear. I suspect something is screwy in the client code. Not too much I can do about that.

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2 Answers 2

up vote 6 down vote accepted

The server is waiting for the client to send a FIN packet. That should be done by closing the socket on the client side (or shutting down the app maybe). Then the server shall go to TIME_WAIT status, waiting for the time-out of the socket. The SO_REUSEADDR enables you to bypass this status.

enter image description here

(Source http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/0/08/TCP_state_diagram.jpg)

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I agree with what you're saying, but I'm already using SO_REUSEADDR and it isn't working. Something else is still causing a problem. Any other ideas? I don't really have control over the client, but it should be closing the socket appropriately as well. (Emphasis on "should be", because I can't truly know that.) –  patrickvacek Mar 16 '11 at 16:30
1  
@patrickvacek: CLOSE_WAIT is a very very strong indication that the client does not close its side of the connection. What happens if you kill the client and start another? –  LHMathies Mar 16 '11 at 16:39
    
@LHMathies: Starting and stopping the client isn't easy and takes some time (it's a behemoth application), but indeed, as soon as it shuts down, netstat doesn't show the connection, and as soon as it starts up again the server and client are able to connect. I was able to get a turnaround of down to 11 seconds, most of which is just waiting for the client to close down. Not sure quite how to proceed, since the client isn't really my territory. I'll have to investage further. @M'vy: That is a good diagram; thanks! Anyone know how best I can see the sending and receiving of FINs and ACKS? –  patrickvacek Mar 16 '11 at 17:51
1  
@patrickvacek: Wireshark or good old tcpdump to see what packets are actually sent and received. About SO_LINGER: some docs suggest that setting it (to zero seconds) on the server side should make it send an RST instead of a FIN, causing an error on the client side and hopefully a reconnect -- but I just checked the Linux kernel code, and that only happens if there is unread receive data buffered or outstanding (un-ACK-ed) send data in flight. I think you need to convince the client people to close the socket (and reconnect) if they see EOF on reading (which they will when you close). –  LHMathies Mar 16 '11 at 20:12
    
Definitely a client-side issue here, my server is doing everything it can. Thanks to everyone for the help in figuring out the details! –  patrickvacek Mar 17 '11 at 16:02
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CLOSE_WAIT on the client means that the network layer is waiting for the application to send more data or close the socket so it can start its side of the closing handshake with the server. The way TCP works, one side can't force the other to close 'nicely'-- the two directions work independently, and the sender has all initiative -- but the server networking layer can time out and abort the connection with a RST once the server program has closed the socket on that side (because even if the client sends more data, noone's there to read it).

I'm guessing that the server networking layer is giving the client a minute to close down, just to be nice, or that the client sends a keep-alive at that point, triggering a reset.

SO_LINGER doesn't affect this situation unless you're leaving data unread on the client side when it closes the connection.

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