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I am trying to create a layered histogram like this with ggplot2: Style plot that I'd like to create

Here are some data and code that I thought would work:

my.data <- data.frame(treat = rep(c(0, 1), 100), prop_score = runif(2 * 100))
my.data <- transform(my.data, treat = ifelse(treat == 1, "treatment", "control"))
my.data <- transform(my.data, treat = as.factor(treat))
my.fig <- ggplot() + geom_histogram(data = my.data, binwidth = 0.05, alpha = 0.01, aes(x = prop_score, linetype = treat, position = identity)) 

But my code produces this: enter image description here

Thanks! I would prefer ggplot2 (while I'm learning, I figured I just learn the common, extensible plotting language), but I'm open to anything/everything.

share|improve this question
    
Since treat is numeric, you either need to change it to a factor or specify group = treat. –  hadley Mar 16 '11 at 16:55
    
@Hadley -- Thanks! I fixed my factor gross conceptual error, but I am missing some other concepts. I tried alpha = 0 but that removed the lines, too. –  Richard Herron Mar 16 '11 at 17:12

3 Answers 3

up vote 8 down vote accepted

I believe this is what you are looking for:

Overlaid histograms

Note that I changed your treatment indicator variable to be TRUE/FALSE rather than 0/1, since it needs to be a factor for ggplot to split on it. The scale_alpha is a bit of a hack because it's for continuous variables, but there isn't a discrete analogue as far as I can tell.

library('ggplot2')
my.data <- data.frame(treat = rep(c(FALSE, TRUE), 100), prop_score = runif(2 * 100))
ggplot(my.data) +
  geom_histogram(binwidth = 0.05
                 , aes(  x = prop_score
                       , alpha = treat
                       , linetype = treat)
                 , colour="black"
                 , fill="white"
                 , position="stack") +
  scale_alpha(limits = c(1, 0))
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks! With identity I was trying to get them properly overlaid. Is that possible? If the counts are the same, then the lines will overlap, but that's OK with me. –  Richard Herron Mar 16 '11 at 17:36
    
richard, yes, you can use position="identity". I must have just mentally changed it when making the plot. –  Kevin L. Mar 18 '11 at 16:19

FWIW, I built on the answers above the get really close to the original histogram I provided.

data.3.t <- subset(data.3, treat == 1)
data.3.c <- subset(data.3, treat == 0)

fig.3 <- ggplot()
fig.3 <- fig.3 + geom_histogram(data = data.3.t , binwidth = 0.05, aes(x = prop_score, linetype = treat.factor), fill = NA, colour = "black")
fig.3 <- fig.3 + geom_histogram(data = data.3.c, binwidth = 0.05, aes(x = prop_score, linetype = treat.factor), fill = NA, colour = "black")
fig.3 <- fig.3 + scale_linetype_manual(values = c(1,2))
fig.3 <- fig.3 + labs(x = "propensity score", linetype = "group")
fig.3 <- fig.3 + theme_bw() 

Which gives something like this: enter image description here

share|improve this answer
my.fig <- ggplot(data = my.data) + 
          geom_histogram(binwidth = 0.05,
                         aes(x = prop_score,
                             position = identity,
                             linetype=treat),
                         fill="white", 
                         colour="black",alpha=0)+
          scale_linetype_manual(values=c(1,2))+
          theme_bw()
share|improve this answer
1  
I think you probably want fill = NA –  hadley Mar 16 '11 at 17:29
    
& Hadley -- Yes, the fill = NA does the trick. But I'd still like to get them "overlaid". This would make same counts in the same bin plot one on top the other, but that's OK with me. Is that possible? –  Richard Herron Mar 16 '11 at 17:39
    
Ok. It doesn't make sense to set fill when alpha=0, so it can be omitted. –  Wojciech Sobala Mar 16 '11 at 17:47

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