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I noticed the following code from our foreign programmers:

private Client[] clients = new Client[0];

public CreateClients(int count)
{
    lock (clients)
    {
        clients = new Client[count];

        for(int i=0; i<count; i++)
        {
           Client[i] = new Client();//Stripped
        }
     }
 }

It's not exactly proper code but I was wondering what exactly this will do. Will this lock on a new object each time this method is called?

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5  
It is a bad practice to lock arrays. Better define additional object for syncronization –  Stecya Mar 16 '11 at 16:44
1  
The code as written is wrong, right? Inside the lock shouldn't it be clients = new Client[count], and then clients[i] = new Client();? –  rsbarro Mar 16 '11 at 16:45
    
You're right, edited it. –  Carra Mar 16 '11 at 16:54
    
It simply is not thread-safe. Multiple threads could be creating and using different arrays, some Clinet()'s would be lost. –  Henk Holterman Mar 16 '11 at 17:05
1  
@Henk OP knows it's bad - the question is "what happens" i.e. understanding what is the bad behavior it has. –  corsiKa Mar 16 '11 at 18:13
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5 Answers

up vote 5 down vote accepted

To answer your question of "I was wondering what exactly this will do" consider what happens if two threads try to do this.

Thread 1: locks on the clients reference, which is `new Client[0]`
   Thread 1 has entered the critical  block
Thread 1: makes a array and assigns it to the clients reference
Thread 2: locks on the clients reference, which is the array just made in thread 1
   Thread 2 has entered the critical block

You know have two threads in the critical block at the same time. That's bad.

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So each time a thread enters it will most likely lock on a new object. Thanks for the explanation. –  Carra Mar 16 '11 at 18:49
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This lock really does nothing. It locks an instance of an object which is immediately changed such that other threads entering this method will lock on a different object. The result is 2 threads executing in the middle of the lock which is probably not what was intended.

A much better approach here is to use a different, non-changing object to lock on

private readonly object clientsLock = new object();
private Client[] clients = new Client[0];  

public CreateClients(int count) {     
  lock (clientsLock) {         
    clients = new string[count]; 
    ...
  }
}
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This code is wrong - it will lock on a new instance every time it's called.

It should look like that:

private static readonly object clientsLock = new object();
private static string[] Clients = null;

public CreateClients(int count)
{
    if(clients == null)
    {
        lock (clientsLock)
        {
            if(clients == null)
            {
                clients = new string[count];

                for(int i=0; i<count; i++)
                {
                     client[i] = new Client();//Stripped
                }
            }
        }
     }
 }

There's no point in locking every time the method is called - that's why the surrounding if clause.

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5  
This will never get in, because you'll never get in your first couple blocks of if clients != null It will always be null because the only way to remove it's nullity is inside the != null block –  corsiKa Mar 16 '11 at 16:50
    
Thanks glowcoder - Silly mistake, sorry. –  Jakub Konecki Mar 16 '11 at 16:56
    
Yes, it probably should be "if (clients == null)" twice. –  ShellShock Mar 16 '11 at 16:57
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Use :
private object = new Object();

lock(object){

//your code

}
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4  
Given that it's an instance method, I see no reason to use a static lock object. –  Jon Skeet Mar 16 '11 at 16:49
    
I know the code is wrong, I was wondering what it does :) –  Carra Mar 16 '11 at 16:53
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I think you're correct to doubt this code!

This code will lock on the previous instance each time - this might be the desired effect, but I doubt it. It won't stop multiple threads from creating multiple arrays.

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