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class Matrix:
  def __init__(self, data):
    self.data = data

  def __repr__(self):
    return repr(self.data)  

  def __add__(self, other):
    data = []

    for j in range(len(self.data)):
        for k in range(len(self.data[0])):
            data.append([self.data[k] + other.data[k]])
        data.append([self.data[j] + other.data[j]])
        data = []

    return Matrix(data)  

x = Matrix([[1,2,3],[2,3,4]])
y = Matrix([[10,10,10],[10,10,10]])
print(x + y,x + x + y)

I was able to get Matrices to add for 1 row by n columns, but when I tried to improve it for all n by n matrices by adding in a second loop I got this error.

Traceback (most recent call last):

  line 24, in <module>
    print(x + y,x + x + y)

  line 15, in __add__
    data.append([self.data[k] + other.data[k]])

IndexError: list index out of range
share|improve this question
    
Have you considered using numpy.matrix? –  StephenPaulger Mar 16 '11 at 16:54
    
@StephenPaulger: I don't think that suggesting a python newbie about numpy is a good idea. numpy is truly great, but using it if you've still to grasp basic python concepts is IMO a recipe for a disaster. –  6502 Mar 17 '11 at 7:51
    
I see your point but one of Python's really strong points is that most things have already been done by someone and they're easy to re-use. Anyone that understands matrix multiplication should be able to figure out installing and using numpy. :) –  StephenPaulger Mar 17 '11 at 12:22

3 Answers 3

How about this:

class Matrix:
  def __init__(self, data):
    self.data = data

  def __repr__(self):
    return repr(self.data)  

  def __add__(self, other):
    data = []

    for j in range(len(self.data)):
        data.append([])
        for k in range(len(self.data[0])):
            data[j].append(self.data[j][k] + other.data[j][k])

    return Matrix(data)
share|improve this answer

How about this logic for addition of two matrices,

resultant=[]
for i,j in zip(A,B):
    temp=[]
    for k,l in zip(i,j):
        temp.append(k+l)
    resultant.append(temp)
share|improve this answer

Your code has a few problems... the first is basic logic of the addition algorithm

data.append([self.data[k] + other.data[k]])

this statement is highly suspect... data is a bidimensional matrix but here your are accessing it with a single index. data[k] is therefore a whole row and using + you are concatenating rows (probably not what you wanted, correct?). Probably the solution of highBandWidth is what you were looking for.

The second problem is more subtle, and is about the statement

self.data = data

This may be a problem because Python uses the so-called "reference semantic". Your matrix will use the passed data parameter for the content but without copying it. It will store a reference to the same data list object you passed to the constructor. May be this is intentional but may be it's not... this is not clear. Is it ok for you that if you build two matrices from the same data and then change the content of a single element in the first also the content of the second changes? If this is not the case then you should copy the elements of data and not just assign the data member for example using

self.data = [row[:] for row in data]

or using copy.deepcopy from the standard copy module.

A third problem is that you are using just two spaces for indenting. This is not smart... when working in python you should use 4 spaces indenting and never use hard tabs chracters. Note that I said that doing this (using two spaces) is not smart, not that you are not smart so please don't take this personally (I even did the very same stupid error myself when starting with python). If you really want to be different then do so by writing amazing bug-free software in python and not by just using a bad indenting or choosing bad names for function or variables. Focus on higher-level beauty.

One last problem is that (once you really understand why your code didn't work) you should really read about python list comprehensions, a tool that can greatly simplify your code if used judiciously. You addition code could for example become

return Matrix([[a + b for a, b in zip(my_row, other_row)]
               for my_row, other_row in zip(self.data, other.data)])

To a trained eye this is easier to read than your original code (and it's also faster).

share|improve this answer

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