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Maybe this is dreaming, but is it possible to create an attribute that caches the output of a function (say, in HttpRuntime.Cache) and returns the value from the cache instead of actually executing the function when the parameters to the function are the same?

When I say function, I'm talking about any function, whether it fetches data from a DB, whether it adds two integers, or whether it spits out the content of a file. Any function.

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maybe you are talking about mocking ? –  Felice Pollano Mar 16 '11 at 17:01
    
I wonder how feasible this would be to implement with dynamic. Create a wrapper that takes the dynamic call, calls into the actual object and caches the result from them on. –  Matt Greer Mar 16 '11 at 19:36
    
@Matt Greer you don't need dynamics to achieve something like that since you've accepted to give up doing it with AOP. I created a base class Cacheable<T> that all you do is inherit from it, define a cache region and give it a lambda statement of how to load the cache on a cache miss. –  Chris Marisic Mar 16 '11 at 19:51
    
@Chris Marisic -- do you mind sharing your Cacheable<T> class? I'd like to check it out. –  Matt Greer Mar 16 '11 at 20:11
    
@PostgresQLNewb: I updated my old answer with a new link that I found today, just in case you are still interested in this stuff –  Dyppl Oct 4 '11 at 6:43

6 Answers 6

Your best bet is Postsharp. I have no idea if they have what you need, but that's certainly worth checking. By the way, make sure to publish the answer here if you find one.

EDIT: also, googling "postsharp caching" gives some links, like this one: Caching with C#, AOP and PostSharp

UPDATE: I recently stumbled upon this article: Introducing Attribute Based Caching. It describes a postsharp-based library on http://cache.codeplex.com/ if you are still looking for a solution.

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2  
this code is great, i just downloaded it and used it for my project. however I had trouble because I am on a 64 bit pc and I think the demo is for x86. So I had to copy the code file by file. Works fine after that –  samwa Oct 6 '11 at 6:36

You could add a dictionary to your class using a comma separated string including the function name as the key, and the result as the value. Then when your functions can check the dictionary for the existence of that value. Save the dictionary in the cache so that it exists for all users.

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Function name is obviously not enough for key anyway, it has to parameter-dependent, I think. But I'm pretty sure that adding plain caching/retrieving code in the beginning of the method is not what the OP is looking for –  Dyppl Mar 16 '11 at 19:06

PostSharp is your one stop shop for this if you want to create a [Cache] attribute (or similar) that you can stick on any method anywhere. Previously when I used PostSharp I could never get past how slow it made my builds (this was back in 2007ish, so this might not be relevant anymore).

An alternate solution is to look into using Render.Partial with ASP.NET MVC in combination with OutputCaching. This is a great solution for serving html for widgets / page regions.

Another solution that would be with MVC would be to implement your [Cache] attribute as an ActionFilterAttribute. This would allow you to take a controller method and tag it to be cached. It would only work for controller methods since the AOP magic only can occur with the ActionFilterAttributes during the MVC pipeline.

Implementing AOP through ActionFilterAttribute has evolved to be the goto solution for my shop.

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AFAIK, frankly, no.

But this would be quite an undertaking to implement within the framework in order for it to work generically for everybody in all circumstances, anyway - you could, however, tailor something quite sufficient to needs by simply (where simplicity is relative to needs, obviously) using abstraction, inheritance and the existing ASP.NET Cache.

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I have just the same problem - I have multiply expensive methods in my app and it is necessary for me to cache those results. Some time ago I just copy-pasted similar code but then I decided to factor this logic out of my domain. This is how I did it before:

    static List<News> _topNews = null;
    static DateTime _topNewsLastUpdateTime = DateTime.MinValue;
    const int CacheTime = 5;  // In minutes

    public IList<News> GetTopNews()
    {
        if (_topNewsLastUpdateTime.AddMinutes(CacheTime) < DateTime.Now)
        {
            _topNews = GetList(TopNewsCount);
        }

        return _topNews;
    }

And that is how I can write it now:

    public IList<News> GetTopNews()
    {
        return Cacher.GetFromCache(() => GetList(TopNewsCount));
    }

Cacher - is a simple helper class, here it is:

public static class Cacher
{
    const int CacheTime = 5;  // In minutes

    static Dictionary<long, CacheItem> _cachedResults = new Dictionary<long, CacheItem>();

    public static T GetFromCache<T>(Func<T> action)
    {
        long code = action.GetHashCode();

        if (!_cachedResults.ContainsKey(code))
        {
            lock (_cachedResults)
            {
                if (!_cachedResults.ContainsKey(code))
                {
                    _cachedResults.Add(code, new CacheItem { LastUpdateTime = DateTime.MinValue });
                }
            }
        }

        CacheItem item = _cachedResults[code];
        if (item.LastUpdateTime.AddMinutes(CacheTime) >= DateTime.Now)
        {
            return (T)item.Result;
        }

        T result = action();

        _cachedResults[code] = new CacheItem
        {
            LastUpdateTime = DateTime.Now,
            Result = result
        };

        return result;
    }
}


class CacheItem
{
    public DateTime LastUpdateTime { get; set; }
    public object Result { get; set; }
}

A few words about Cacher. You might notice that I don't use Monitor.Enter() ( lock(...) ) while computing results. It's because copying CacheItem pointer ( return (T)_cachedResults[code].Result; line) is thread safe operation - it is performed by only one stroke. Also it is ok if more than one thread will change this pointer at the same time - they all will be valid.

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But is it thread-safe to be reading (TryGetValue) from the dictionary while another thread inserts a value? An insert will change the internal structure of the dictionary, and reading from the dictionary during that insert may (I'm not sure) result in undefined behavior. –  Greg Mar 28 '11 at 6:15
    
Greg, I believe it is. The internal implementation of TryGetValue just iterates in its Array if 'for' cycle and searches for a hash key that will fit the requested value. If the Array changes nothing should happen –  Lenin Mar 28 '11 at 6:33
    
    
Greg, thank you for the point. I've updated the code –  Lenin Mar 28 '11 at 7:01

If you don't need attribute configuration but accept code configuration, maybe MbCache is what you're looking for?

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