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I am trying with below code to generate 10 digits unique random number. As per my req i have to create around 5000 unique numbers(ids). This is not working as expected. It also generates -ve numbers. Also sometimes one or two digits are missing in generated number resulting in 8 or 9 numbers not 10.

public static synchronized  List generateRandomPin(){

    int START =1000000000;
    //int END = Integer.parseInt("9999999999");
    //long END = Integer.parseInt("9999999999");
    long END = 9999999999L;

    Random random = new Random();

    for (int idx = 1; idx <= 3000; ++idx){
        createRandomInteger(START, END, random);
    }

    return null;
}


private static void createRandomInteger(int aStart, long aEnd, Random aRandom){
    if ( aStart > aEnd ) {
      throw new IllegalArgumentException("Start cannot exceed End.");
    }
    //get the range, casting to long to avoid overflow problems
    long range = (long)aEnd - (long)aStart + 1;
    logger.info("range>>>>>>>>>>>"+range);
    // compute a fraction of the range, 0 <= frac < range
    long fraction = (long)(range * aRandom.nextDouble());
    logger.info("fraction>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>"+fraction);
    int randomNumber =  (int)(fraction + aStart);    
    logger.info("Generated : " + randomNumber);

  }
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7 Answers 7

up vote 5 down vote accepted

I think the reason you're getting 8/9 digit values and negative numbers is that you're adding fraction, a long (signed 64-bit value) which may be larger than the positive int range (32-bit value) to aStart.

The value is overflowing such that randomNumber is in the negative 32-bit range or has almost wrapped around to aStart (since int is a signed 32-bit value, fraction would only need to be slightly less than (2^32 - aStart) for you to see 8 or 9 digit values).

You need to use long for all the values.

   private static void createRandomInteger(int aStart, long aEnd, Random aRandom){
    if ( aStart > aEnd ) {
      throw new IllegalArgumentException("Start cannot exceed End.");
    }
    //get the range, casting to long to avoid overflow problems
    long range = aEnd - (long)aStart + 1;
    logger.info("range>>>>>>>>>>>"+range);
    // compute a fraction of the range, 0 <= frac < range
    long fraction = (long)(range * aRandom.nextDouble());
    logger.info("fraction>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>"+fraction);
    long randomNumber =  fraction + (long)aStart;    
    logger.info("Generated : " + randomNumber);

  }
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Thanks a lot.. It is working fine now.. –  RajaShanmugam Mar 17 '11 at 5:09

So you want a fixed length random number of 10 digits? This can be done easier:

long number = (long) Math.floor(Math.random() * 9000000000L) + 1000000000L;

Note that 10-digit numbers over Integer.MAX_VALUE doesn't fit in an int, hence the long.

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1  
Intuitively, I feel that (long) Math.floor(Math.random() * 9000000000L) can yield all possible longs in the range [0,9000000000L), but is there a proof or counter-proof for it? A question to ponder over as I lay in bed.. –  blizpasta Mar 16 '11 at 17:21
    
Hi BalusC, is there a reason why you use 9000000000L instead of 9999999999L? –  Thang Pham Aug 3 '11 at 20:58
    
@Harry: The requirement states 10 digits, not 11 digits. –  BalusC Aug 3 '11 at 21:00
    
@BalusC: thank you –  Thang Pham Aug 4 '11 at 2:01
    
@BalusC what to use instead of 9000000000L for a 12 digit number ? –  mukund Jan 23 at 8:47
long drand = (long)(rand.nextDouble()*10000000000L);

sometimes it is having less than 10 digits

long number = (long) Math.floor(Math.random() * 9000000000L) + 1000000000L;

This one is working. Thanks

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Maybe you are looking for this one:

Random rand = new Random();

long drand = (long)(rand.nextDouble()*10000000000L);

You can simply put this inside a loop.

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this is for random number starting from 1 and 2 (10 digits).

public int gen() {
    Random r = new Random(System.currentTimeMillis());
    return 1000000000 + r.nextInt(2000000000);
}

hopefully it works.

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This is a utility method for generating a fixed length random number.

    public final static String createRandomNumber(long len) {
    if (len > 18)
        throw new IllegalStateException("To many digits");
    long tLen = (long) Math.pow(10, len - 1) * 9;

    long number = (long) (Math.random() * tLen) + (long) Math.pow(10, len - 1) * 1;

    String tVal = number + "";
    if (tVal.length() != len) {
        throw new IllegalStateException("The random number '" + tVal + "' is not '" + len + "' digits");
    }
    return tVal;
}
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Hi you can use the following method to generate 10 digit random number

private static int getRndNumber() {
    Random random=new Random();
    int randomNumber=0;
    boolean loop=true;
    while(loop) {
        randomNumber=random.nextInt();
        if(Integer.toString(randomNumber).length()==10 && !Integer.toString(randomNumber).startsWith("-")) {
            loop=false;
        }
        }
    return randomNumber;
}
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Need to use long (not int) due to overflow - see accepted answer for this question. Other than that, it's a bad idea to use a loop to reach a number with a certain number of decimals - it gives a runtime penalty in the average case. –  poplitea Sep 29 '12 at 11:48

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