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This is a two part question and for education purposes rather than trying to find a solution to a problem.

I've seen this already and realize that it's very similar to my question

LINQ2SQL - Cross join emitted when I want inner join

But I am hoping for more information from you LINQ and SQL gurus as to why the cross join is created instead of inner join in LINQ2SQL. Additionally, can someone explain how SQL Server decides on the execution plan (or link to further information) since both of these queries generate the same plan? From what I understand, this means that the performance of the queries are the same.

I've created a small example that runs two LINQ expressions on my database that generates these two different SQL queries.

For those who don't want to bother, here's my example db diagram:

Here are the two queries: Cross Join with Where Clause

var q = from item in context.Items
join i_mem in context.Memberships on new { item_id = item.ID, user_id = 
current_user_id.Value } equals new { item_id = i_mem.RelatedItemID, user_id = 
i_mem.RelatedUserID } into sq_i_m
from im in sq_i_m.DefaultIfEmpty()
join i_cat in context.Categories on item.RelatedCategoryID equals i_cat.ID 
into sq_i_cat
from proj in sq_i_cat
select item;

Inner Join

from item in context.Items
join i_mem in context.Memberships on
new { item_id = item.ID, user_id = current_user_id.Value }
equals
new { item_id = i_mem.RelatedItemID, user_id = i_mem.RelatedUserID }
into sq_i_m
from im in sq_i_m.DefaultIfEmpty()
join i_cat in context.Categories on item.RelatedCategoryID equals i_cat.ID
select item

And here is the test program if you'd like to see for yourself.

Thanks for everyone's help.

Mustafa

share|improve this question
1  
You do know that if you have relationships setup in your .dbml file you can access other tables without doing a literal join in your code. –  The Muffin Man Mar 16 '11 at 18:10
    
@Nick - As in something like: from i in context.Items where i.RelatedMembership.CreatedOn < Datetime.UtcNow select i for example? If so, yes I'm aware. I'm mostly asking the question just to learn more about how the joins are created by LINQ and also to learn how SQL Server knows to get the same execution plan. (On a side note, I'd also like to confirm my guess that the performance is the same either way) –  Mustafakidd Mar 16 '11 at 18:13

2 Answers 2

They are the same thing, so it does not matter which LINQ2SQL emits.

An inner join is logically equivalent to a cross join with a where clause filter equivalent to the on of the inner join clause.

That's why Sql Server generates the same query plan.

To be clear, the inner join:

Select f1 
From T1 inner join T2 on T1.k = T2.k
where T1.f2 like 'X%'

Is the same as the cross join:

Select f1 
From T1 cross join T2 
where T1.k = T2.k
and T1.f2 like 'X%'

is the same as old-style SQL:

Select f1 
From T1, T2 
where T1.k = T2.k
and T1.f2 like 'X%'
share|improve this answer
    
So if I were writing it out in straight TSQL, is it purely my choice as to which syntax I like that determines which style I use? As I mentioned before, it just "seems" that doing the filtering on the join would create a more efficient execution plan than doing a join and then a where clause. Speaking only about the SQL - if I were using another RDMS other than SQL Server, would the execution plan necessarily be the same between all of the above styles? –  Mustafakidd Mar 18 '11 at 5:14

Lets say you have a datacontext called MyDataContext.

using(MyDataContext db = new MyDataContext())
{
  var q = db.Items.Where(x=> x.Categories.Name == "myCategory").Select(x=> x);
}

This is a very simple example, but you didn't need to write out a join or a subquery in TSQL syntax. (I hate writing TSQL).

share|improve this answer
    
Could just be because I wrote a lot of TSQL in the past and still "think" that way, often, but I don't mind the syntax. Thanks for your example, I've seen this syntax, as well, obviously and use it also. Again, though, just wondering more about how the SQL is generated by LINQ and 1. whether it matters since execution plan on sql server is the same or 2. how is sql server so smart? –  Mustafakidd Mar 16 '11 at 18:25
    
@Mustafakidd, a Microsoft programmer wrote all of the code to translate it, it has nothing to do with the LINQ being "smart." As far as using query expression syntax or dot notation/lambda syntax, be aware that certain operations are only available with lambda, such as Single(), First(), Count(). However, if you do want to use joins, then query syntax is much easier to write/read. –  The Muffin Man Mar 16 '11 at 18:31
    
was being "jokey" but am also referring to SQL server knowing how to create the same execution plan regardless of whether an inner join or cross join is used in the actual TSQL query. Instinct says that the inner join would be more efficient than a cross join with a where clause, but obviously that's not true. –  Mustafakidd Mar 16 '11 at 18:35

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