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This is a resource-allocation problem. My goal is to run a query to fetch the top-priority shift for any time-slot.

The dataset is very large. For this example, let’s say there are 100 shifts each for 1000 companies (though the real dataset is even larger). They are all loaded into memory, and I need to run a single LINQ to Objects query against them:

    var topShifts =
            (from s in shifts
            where (from s2 in shifts
                   where s2.CompanyId == s.CompanyId && s.TimeSlot == s2.TimeSlot
                   orderby s2.Priority
                   select s2).First().Equals(s)
            select s).ToList();

The problem is that without optimization, LINQ to Objects will compare each and every object in both sets, doing a cross-join of all 1,000 x 100 against 1,000 x 100, which amounts to 10 billion (10,000,000,000) comparisons. What I want is to compare only objects within each company (as if Company were indexed in a SQL table). This should result in 1000 sets of 100 x 100 objects for a total of 10 million (10,000,000) comparisons. The later would scale linearly rather than exponentially as the number of companies grows.

Technologies like I4o would allow me to do something like this, but unfortunately, I don’t have the luxury of using a custom collection in the environment in which I’m executing this query. Also, I only expect to run this query once on any given dataset, so the value of a persistent index is limited. I’m expecting to use an extension method which would group the data by company, then run the expression on each group.

Full Sample code:

public struct Shift
{
    public static long Iterations;

    private int companyId;
    public int CompanyId
    {
        get { Iterations++; return companyId; }
        set { companyId = value; }
    }

    public int Id;
    public int TimeSlot;
    public int Priority;
}

class Program
{
    static void Main(string[] args)
    {
        const int Companies = 1000;
        const int Shifts = 100;
        Console.WriteLine(string.Format("{0} Companies x {1} Shifts", Companies, Shifts));
        var timer = Stopwatch.StartNew();

        Console.WriteLine("Populating data");
        var shifts = new List<Shift>();
        for (int companyId = 0; companyId < Companies; companyId++)
        {
            for (int shiftId = 0; shiftId < Shifts; shiftId++)
            {
                shifts.Add(new Shift() { CompanyId = companyId, Id = shiftId, TimeSlot = shiftId / 3, Priority = shiftId % 5 });
            }
        }
        Console.WriteLine(string.Format("Completed in {0:n}ms", timer.ElapsedMilliseconds));
        timer.Restart();

        Console.WriteLine("Computing Top Shifts");
        var topShifts =
                (from s in shifts
                where (from s2 in shifts
                       where s2.CompanyId == s.CompanyId && s.TimeSlot == s2.TimeSlot
                       orderby s2.Priority
                       select s2).First().Equals(s)
                select s).ToList();
        Console.WriteLine(string.Format("Completed in {0:n}ms", timer.ElapsedMilliseconds));
        timer.Restart();

        Console.WriteLine("\nShifts:");
        foreach (var shift in shifts.Take(20))
        {
            Console.WriteLine(string.Format("C {0} Id {1} T {2} P{3}", shift.CompanyId, shift.Id, shift.TimeSlot, shift.Priority));
        }

        Console.WriteLine("\nTop Shifts:");
        foreach (var shift in topShifts.Take(10))
        {
            Console.WriteLine(string.Format("C {0} Id {1} T {2} P{3}", shift.CompanyId, shift.Id, shift.TimeSlot, shift.Priority));
        }

        Console.WriteLine(string.Format("\nTotal Comparisons: {0:n}", Shift.Iterations/2));

        Console.WriteLine("Any key to continue");
        Console.ReadKey();
    }
}

Sample output:

1000 Companies x 100 Shifts
Populating data
Completed in 10.00ms
Computing Top Shifts
Completed in 520,721.00ms

Shifts:
C 0 Id 0 T 0 P0
C 0 Id 1 T 0 P1
C 0 Id 2 T 0 P2
C 0 Id 3 T 1 P3
C 0 Id 4 T 1 P4
C 0 Id 5 T 1 P0
C 0 Id 6 T 2 P1
C 0 Id 7 T 2 P2
C 0 Id 8 T 2 P3
C 0 Id 9 T 3 P4
C 0 Id 10 T 3 P0
C 0 Id 11 T 3 P1
C 0 Id 12 T 4 P2
C 0 Id 13 T 4 P3
C 0 Id 14 T 4 P4
C 0 Id 15 T 5 P0
C 0 Id 16 T 5 P1
C 0 Id 17 T 5 P2
C 0 Id 18 T 6 P3
C 0 Id 19 T 6 P4

Top Shifts:
C 0 Id 0 T 0 P0
C 0 Id 5 T 1 P0
C 0 Id 6 T 2 P1
C 0 Id 10 T 3 P0
C 0 Id 12 T 4 P2
C 0 Id 15 T 5 P0
C 0 Id 20 T 6 P0
C 0 Id 21 T 7 P1
C 0 Id 25 T 8 P0
C 0 Id 27 T 9 P2

Total Comparisons: 10,000,000,015.00
Any key to continue

Questions:

  1. How can I partition the query (while still executing as a single LinQ query) in order to get the comparisons down from 10 billion to 10 million?
  2. Is there a more efficient way of solving the problem instead of a sub-query?
share|improve this question
    
Nicely explained question for a noob. More like this :-) +1 –  Dave Archer Mar 16 '11 at 20:05
    
Thanks. I actually have a follow-up (coming soon) that will focus on matching the times using ranges instead of TimeSlot IDs. I wanted to post it seperately in order to avoid overly complicating the issue. –  timherby Mar 16 '11 at 21:14
    
For reference, here's the follow-up question that doesn't use TimeSlot IDs. Once I introduced overlap detection, I'm still having trouble figuring out how grouping can be done, but I'm sure that grouping is the answer to that too. –  timherby Mar 17 '11 at 6:39

3 Answers 3

up vote 3 down vote accepted

How about

            var topShifts = from s in shifts.GroupBy(s => s.CompanyId)
                        from a in s.GroupBy(b => b.TimeSlot)
                        select a.OrderBy(p => p.Priority).First();

Seems to get the same output but 100015 comparisons

with @Geoff's edit he just halved my comparisons :-)

share|improve this answer
    
+1 I don't think my answer would beat this anyway :) This completes in 5ms on my PC. –  Geoff Appleford Mar 16 '11 at 20:24
    
Thanks. This solves it, and runs extremely fast (86ms for me if I add the .ToList() back to the end of the query). I like that it completely bypasses the subquery. Awarding the answer to this one since it was the first to post the netsted groupBy. –  timherby Mar 16 '11 at 21:09

Have you tried using group by:

var topShifts =  from s in shifts
                 group s by new { 
                     CompanyId = s.CompanyId, 
                     TimeSlot = s.TimeSlot } into p
                 let temp = p.OrderBy(x => x.Priority).FirstOrDefault()
                 select new
                     {
                         CompanyId = temp.CompanyId,
                         TimeSlot = temp.TimeSlot,
                         Id = temp.Id,
                         Priority = temp.Priority
                     };
share|improve this answer
    
That gets a different result set, but I'm still trying to figure out why –  Dave Archer Mar 16 '11 at 20:02
    
@David. Its working now. I was also grouping by the shiftId. Speed wise is similar to your answer, so I guess its just what code style you prefer. –  Geoff Appleford Mar 16 '11 at 20:51
    
50015 comparisons!!!! Nice! –  Dave Archer Mar 16 '11 at 21:00

I'm a bit unsure about what you want to be honest but from Reading your code I'd say you could do something like

(from company in shifts.GroupBy(s=>s.CompanyID)
 let lowPriority = (from slot in company.GroupBy(s=>s.TimeSlot)
select slot).OrderBy(s=>s.Priority).First()
 select lowPriority).ToList();
share|improve this answer
    
this doesn't compile. –  Geoff Appleford Mar 16 '11 at 20:26
    
@Geoff what can I say. My phone doesn't have a compiler and my head doesn't produce error messages but the idea should be pretty obvious (especially the answers posted after this uses the same methodology :)) hope it compiles now but got no way to verify –  Rune FS Mar 16 '11 at 20:40
    
fair enough. Its still not working properly but I get your point. –  Geoff Appleford Mar 16 '11 at 20:53

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