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I need to convert strings to DateTime objects that are in non-English languages. I've seen many examples of converting DateTime to strings in other languages, but not the other way around.

This doesn't seem to work:

CultureInfo provider = new CultureInfo("ar-AE");    // Arabic - United Arab Emirates

string sample = "الاربعاء 16 مارس 2011"; // Arabic date in Gregorian calendar
DateTime result;
DateTime expected = new DateTime(2011, 3, 16);   // the expected date
bool b;

b = DateTime.TryParse(sample, provider, DateTimeStyles.None, out result);

Assert.IsTrue(b);
Assert.AreEqual(expected, result);

Additionally, I need to handle strings that are in other calendars. This is what I tried and it doesn't seem to work either.

CultureInfo provider = new CultureInfo("ar-AE");    // Arabic - United Arab Emirates
provider.DateTimeFormat.Calendar = new System.Globalization.HijriCalendar();
// Wednesday, March 16, 2011, 11 Rabi second in 1432
string sample = " ‏11 ربيع ثاني 1432 ";
DateTime result;
DateTime expected = new DateTime(2011, 3, 16);   // ?
bool b;

b = DateTime.TryParse(sample, provider, DateTimeStyles.None, out result);

Assert.IsTrue(b);
Assert.AreEqual(expected, result);

What am I missing?

share|improve this question
    
I think there is a small problem with arabic unicode normalization (or something similar)... I think the word "wednesday" can be written in two ways... If you try expected.ToString("ddd dd MMMM yyyy", provider) you'll see that the string seems the same, but isn't binary-equal. Your 2nd character is 0x0627 (ARABIC LETTER ALEF), the ToString one is 0x0623 (ARABIC LETTER ALEF WITH HAMZA ABOVE). I don't know anything of arab, but I hope this will help you. –  xanatos Mar 16 '11 at 23:10

3 Answers 3

up vote 2 down vote accepted

If you know the exact format, you can force its use with TryParseExact:

b = DateTime.TryParseExact(sample, "dddd d MMMM yyyy", provider, DateTimeStyles.None, out result);

However, in your case, this does not work. To find the problem, let’s try the other way round:

Console.WriteLine(expected.ToString("dddd d MMMM yyyy", provider));

And the result is “الأربعاء 16 مارس 2011”, which (you can probably read that better than me) differs from your input in one character: .NET uses (and expects) hamza, your input does not have it. If we modify the input in this way, everything works:

CultureInfo provider = new CultureInfo("ar-AE");    // Arabic - United Arab Emirates

string sample = "الأربعاء 16 مارس 2011"; // Arabic date in Gregorian calendar
DateTime result;
DateTime expected = new DateTime(2011, 3, 16);   // the expected date
bool b;

b = DateTime.TryParse(sample, provider, DateTimeStyles.None, out result);

Assert.IsTrue(b);
Assert.AreEqual(expected, result);
share|improve this answer
    
I don't read Arabic either, and it turns out the words are days of the week and month, etc. Once I had specified a format string it worked rather well. Thanks! –  Dan Bailiff Apr 14 '11 at 19:52
DateTime result = DateTime.Parse("الاربعاء 16 مارس 2011", new CultureInfo("ar-JO"));

But you can check the documentation : CultureInfo Class

share|improve this answer
    
That didn't work on my machine, even though we moved to Jordan? –  Mikael Östberg Mar 16 '11 at 20:03
    
Just tried your example and got this: "The string was not recognized as a valid DateTime. There is an unknown word starting at index 0." I literally copy/pasted your example. What gives? –  Dan Bailiff Mar 16 '11 at 20:18
    
Do you know which languages will you use ? –  malinois Mar 16 '11 at 20:21
    
I'm reading documents in various languages, and yes I know which language/culture is appropriate for each document. –  Dan Bailiff Mar 16 '11 at 21:10

maybe something like this:

int Year, DayOfMonth;
string Month;
string[] Months = new string[] {"ينایر","فبرایر","مارس","ابریل","مایو",...};//these texts are writen with persian keyboard,change the ی  with ي ,its really hard with my keymap
string[] Splits = Input.Split(" ");
foreach(string Split in Splits)
{
    if(Months.Contains(Split))
    {
        Month = Months.IndexOf(Split);
    }
    else
    {
        int Number;
        if(int.TryParse(Split, out Number))
        {
            if(Number<32)
            {
                DayOfMonth=Number;
            }
            else
            {
                Year=Number;
            }
        }
    }
}

if your going to support multiple calendars:
you should add all the calendars months in order in that array.
after december there should be the next calendar months ( rabi-ol-avval, rabi-ol-thani, ...)
then

int CalendarId = Month / 12;
Month %= 12;

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