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I am currently trying to optimize my Python program and got started with Cython in order to reduce the function calling overhead and perhaps later on include optimized C-libraries functions.

So I ran into the first problem:

I am using composition in my code to create a larger class. So far I have gotten one of my Python classes converted to Cython (which was difficult enough). Here's the code:

import numpy as np
cimport numpy as np
ctypedef np.float64_t dtype_t
ctypedef np.complex128_t cplxtype_t
ctypedef Py_ssize_t index_t

cdef class bendingForcesClass(object):
    cdef dtype_t bendingRigidity
    cdef np.ndarray matrixPrefactor
    cdef np.ndarray bendingForces

    def __init__(self, dtype_t bendingRigidity, np.ndarray[dtype_t, ndim=2] waveNumbersNorm):
        self.bendingRigidity = bendingRigidity
        self.matrixPrefactor = -self.bendingRigidity * waveNumbersNorm ** 2

    cpdef np.ndarray calculate(self, np.ndarray membraneHeight):
        cdef np.ndarray bendingForces
        bendingForces = self.matrixPrefactor * membraneHeight
        return bendingForces

From my composed Python/Cython class I am calling the class-method calculate, so that in my composed class I have the following (reduced) code:

from bendingForcesClass import bendingForcesClass

cdef class membraneClass(object):
    def  __init__(self, systemSideLength, lowerCutoffLength, bendingRigidity):
        self.bendingForces = bendingForcesClass(bendingRigidity, self.waveNumbers.norm)

    def calculateForces(self, heightR):
        return self.bendingForces.calculate(heightR)

I have found out that cpdef makes the method/functions callable from Python and Cython, which is great and works, as long as I don't try to define the type of self.bendingForces beforehand - which according to http://wiki.cython.org/EarlyBindingForSpeed is necessary in order to remove the function-calling overhead. I have tried the following, which does not work:

from bendingForcesClass import bendingForcesClass
from bendingForcesClass cimport bendingForcesClass

    cdef class membraneClass(object):
        cdef bendingForcesClass bendingForces

        def  __init__(self, systemSideLength, lowerCutoffLength, bendingRigidity):
            self.bendingForces = bendingForcesClass(bendingRigidity, self.waveNumbers.norm)

        def calculateForces(self, heightR):
            return self.bendingForces.calculate(heightR)

With this I get this error, when trying to build membraneClass.pyx with Cython:

membraneClass.pyx:18:6: 'bendingForcesClass' is not a type identifier
building 'membraneClass' extension

Note that the declarations are in two separate files, which makes this more difficult.

So I how do I get this done? I would be very thankful if someone could give me a pointer, as I can't find any information about this, besides the link given above.

Thanks and best regards!

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I'd like to see what the problem is, so keep us posted if something works out! –  highBandWidth Mar 18 '11 at 15:24

1 Answer 1

These are probably not the source of the error, but just to narrow down the problem, you might try to change the following:

Could it be that you are using bendingForces as the name of the variable here:

cpdef np.ndarray calculate( self, np.ndarray membraneHeight ) :
      cdef np.ndarray bendingForces
      bendingForces = self.matrixPrefactor * membraneHeight
      return bendingForces

and also the name of the member object here:

cdef class membraneClass( object ):
    cdef bendingForcesClass bendingForces

Also, bendingForcesClass is the name of the module as well as the class. Finally, how about making a ctypedef from the class bendingForcesClass?

share|improve this answer
    
due to editing the original question to use PEP8, this answer is slightly out of sync; sorry about that. –  Erik Allik Nov 5 '12 at 13:20

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