Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

This code:

public class PMTest
{

    private static class Runner { }
    private static class Server extends Runner { }

    private static class Task
    {
        public void delegate(Runner runner)
        {
            System.out.println("Task: " + runner.getClass().getName() +
                               " / " + this.getClass().getName());
        }
    }

    private static class Action extends Task
    {
        public void delegate(Server server)
        {
            System.out.println("Action: " + server.getClass().getName() +
                               " / " + this.getClass().getName());
        }
    }


    private static void foo(Task task, Runner runner)
    {
            task.delegate(runner);
    }

    private static void bar(Action task, Runner runner)
    {
            task.delegate(runner);
    }

    private static void baz(Action task, Server runner)
    {
            task.delegate(runner);
    }


    public static void main (String[] args)
    {
        try {
            Server server = new Server();
            Action action = new Action();

            action.delegate(server);
            foo(action, server);
            bar(action, server);
            baz(action, server);

        }
        catch (Throwable t) {
            t.printStackTrace();
        }
    }
}

produces this output:

$ java PMTest
Action: PMTest$Server / PMTest$Action
Task: PMTest$Server / PMTest$Action
Task: PMTest$Server / PMTest$Action
Action: PMTest$Server / PMTest$Action

I can see very clearly that Task's method is being chosen over Action's method. I don't understand why, though, since the objects always know what they are and I thought Java's late-binding method selection would be able to distinguish the difference in method signatures. The call to bar() is especially confusing, as task is declared as an Action at that point.

If it makes a difference, this is Java 6:

$ java -version
java version "1.6.0_14"
Java(TM) SE Runtime Environment (build 1.6.0_14-b08)
BEA JRockit(R) (build R27.6.5-32_o-121899-1.6.0_14-20091001-2113-linux-ia32, compiled mode)

I can change my code to make it work, but I'd like to understand why it doesn't work. Thanks for the help!

share|improve this question

3 Answers 3

up vote 5 down vote accepted

That's how dispatch works in java.

Dispatch is based first on static parameter types, and once a static signature has been chosen, then the runtime type of the object containing the method is used to figure out which overriding is used.

For example, in

void foo(Object o) {
  if (o instanceof Number) { foo((Number) o); }
  else if (o instanceof String) { foo((String) o); }
}

void foo(String s) { ... }

void foo(Number n) { ... }

{ foo((Object) "foo"); }  // Calls foo(Object) which calls foo(String).
{ foo("foo"); }  // Calls foo(String) without first calling foo(Object).
share|improve this answer
2  
+1: This is the right answer. In summary, Java doesn't do double dispatch (although it can be emulated). –  Oliver Charlesworth Mar 16 '11 at 20:56
    
So the dispatching is based on the declared parameter type, not the runtime parameter type? I can understand the actual rule, I suppose, but I don't understand why it would be implemented like that. It seems like it's only somewhat late-binding then. –  Joe Casadonte Mar 16 '11 at 21:01
    
OK, looks like Ernest answered my follow-up on why -- thanks! –  Joe Casadonte Mar 16 '11 at 21:03
    
@Joe, Yes, dispatch is based on the declared type. One reason is that it makes it easy for compilers to optimize -- that's why it was done in C++, and Java was designed to be easy for C++ developers to learn. A reason people use to argue it should stay that way is it makes it easy for developers who know the rules to figure out what code does -- having a level of static dispatch makes code easier to review and learn. –  Mike Samuel Mar 16 '11 at 21:10

The choice between overloaded methods is always made at compile time, never at runtime. Runtime polymorphism involves choosing between methods that override other methods -- i.e., methods with identical signatures.

share|improve this answer

Because once you pass Server into foo or bar, in the scope of that call it is not a Server but rather a Runner.

Therefore, when you run delegate it will bind to the most appropriate match, according to the method's signature. delegate(Runner) doesn't require the dangerous downcast of the scoped parameter into a Server.

Note that this scoping is not done at runtime, it will hold up to static analysis of the source code too. It's just that you remember server was a Server that's confusing you. If you analyse the code without that extra out-of-scope knowledge, then you'll see that delegate(Runner) really is you only valid choice.

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.