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Still dealing with quirky files (see my previous post), I am using SED to cleanup some that are laid out like so:

....Receiver ID   = 028912781755
    Serial Number = WD-WCAUH0546786
    Current temp  = 50C
    PowerOnHours  = 13166h
    Receiver ID   = 028920310381
    Serial Number = WD-WCAUH0898333
    Current temp  = 51C
    PowerOnHours  = 9099h...

My boss wants files like this one to be tab ("\t") delimited like so

Receiver ID = 028912781755 Serial Number = WD-WCAUH0546786 Current temp  = 50C PowerOnHours  = 13166h

This is my sed code:

sed -e '/.$/N; s/.\n/\t/'

It works but strangely, not everywhere. This is the output I get

Receiver ID   = 028920310381 Serial Number = WD-WCAUH0898333 
Current temp  = 51 PowerOnHours  = 9099h

====================================================================== I need to be more specific. All suggestions I got produce the same result: it appends everything on one singly line. Not what I am looking for.

I am looking for:

Receiver ID = ...<tab>Serial Number = ...<tab>Current temp  = ...<tab>PowerOnHours  = ...<tab><carriage return>
Receiver ID = ...<tab>Serial Number = ...<tab>Current temp  = ...<tab>PowerOnHours  = ...<tab> 
share|improve this question
    
My boss wants files like this one to be tab ("\t") delimited like so. Where exactly are the tabs? Only where a newline once was? –  SiegeX Mar 16 '11 at 21:03
    
@SiegeX: correct. –  Chris Mar 16 '11 at 21:04

6 Answers 6

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Number of fields vary but end in PowerOnHours

awk 'ORS=/PowerOnHours/?RS:"\t"' ./infile

Proof of Concept

$ awk 'ORS=/PowerOnHours/?RS:"\t"' receiverid
Receiver ID   = 028912781755    Special Field = foo bar baz     Serial Number = WD-WCAUH0546786 Current temp  = 50C     PowerOnHours  = 13166h
Receiver ID   = 028920310381    Serial Number = WD-WCAUH0898333 Current temp  = 51C     PowerOnHours  = 9099h
Receiver ID   = 028912781755    Serial Number = WD-WCAUH0546786 Current temp  = 50C     PowerOnHours  = 13166h
Receiver ID   = 028920310381    Serial Number = WD-WCAUH0898333 Current temp  = 51C     PowerOnHours  = 9099h

*Note the Special Field on the first line


Number of fields between records are the same

awk 'ORS=NR%4?"\t":RS' ./infile

Proof of Concept

$ awk 'ORS=NR%4?"\t":RS' ./infile
Receiver ID   = 028912781755    Serial Number = WD-WCAUH0546786 Current temp  = 50C     PowerOnHours  = 13166h
Receiver ID   = 028920310381    Serial Number = WD-WCAUH0898333 Current temp  = 51C     PowerOnHours  = 9099h
Receiver ID   = 028912781755    Serial Number = WD-WCAUH0546786 Current temp  = 50C     PowerOnHours  = 13166h
Receiver ID   = 028920310381    Serial Number = WD-WCAUH0898333 Current temp  = 51C     PowerOnHours  = 9099h
share|improve this answer
    
@SiegeX: your solution is appending all the records in my inbound on one single line. Not what I am trying to accomplish ; what I am looking for instead is what I describe in the edit of my OP: field\tabfield\tabfield\tabfield\newline –  Chris Mar 16 '11 at 23:29
    
@Chris I'm confused, your statement seems to conflict with the answer chosen (which I also have). They produce identical output when given the same file as input. I don't see how any of the answers provided will produce a newline between "Receiver ID" records, they all blindly replace newlines with tabs. It is also unclear to me where you came up with your desired output given the sample input. Are there multiple "Receiver ID" blocks per file? Are you trying to concatenate together multiple files into one, each with a single "Receiver ID" block? These things are not clear –  SiegeX Mar 16 '11 at 23:52
    
I got this to work: #! /bin/bash while read line; do [[ "$line" =~ PowerOnHours ]] && { printf '%s\n' "$line" } || { printf '%s\t' "$line" } done <infile –  Chris Mar 17 '11 at 16:58
    
It produces this output: Receiver ID = 028918576472 Serial Number = WD-WCAUK0635287 Current temp = 50C PowerOnHours = 12972h Receiver ID = 028968505835 Serial Number = WD-WCAUH1726359 Current temp = 48C PowerOnHours = 9591h –  Chris Mar 17 '11 at 16:58
    
@SiegeX: my apologies if I wasn't clear. Each ReceiverID field marks the beginning of a new record, when PowerOnHours field the end. Yes, there are multiple "Receiver ID" blocks per file. Thanks for taking the time. I appreciate that. –  Chris Mar 17 '11 at 17:01

Give this a try:

sed '/^Receiver/N;N;N;s/\n/\t/g' inputfile

Explanation:

  • /^Receiver/N;N;N; - Each time a line that begins with "Receiver" is read, append the next three lines.
  • s/\n/\t/g - Replace the embedded newlines with tabs

Sample output:

Receiver ID   = 028912781755        Serial Number = WD-WCAUH0546786        Current temp  = 50C        PowerOnHours  = 13166h
Receiver ID   = 028920310381        Serial Number = WD-WCAUH0898333        Current temp  = 51C        PowerOnHours  = 9099h

(I exaggerated the tabs for effect.)

share|improve this answer
    
very elegant. I am no there yet. Thanks for your time. –  Chris Mar 17 '11 at 18:05

you can use awk

$ cat  file
Receiver ID   = 028912781755
Serial Number = WD-WCAUH0546786
Current temp  = 50C
PowerOnHours  = 13166h
Receiver ID   = 028920310381
Serial Number = WD-WCAUH0898333
Current temp  = 51C
PowerOnHours  = 9099h...

$ awk 'BEGIN{RS="Receiver";OFS="\t"}NF>1{$1=$1;print "Receiver\t"$0}' file
Receiver        ID      =       028912781755    Serial  Number  =       WD-WCAUH0546786 Current temp    =       50C     PowerOnHours    =       13166h
Receiver        ID      =       028920310381    Serial  Number  =       WD-WCAUH0898333 Current temp    =       51C     PowerOnHours    =       9099h...
share|improve this answer
    
it works. Thanks. Can you please explain the purpose of $1 in your awk code? –  Chris Mar 17 '11 at 18:08
    
@Chris, the $1=$1 is to "reformat" the fields. I can't think of a good explanation, but please read Effective awk for its explanation. –  kurumi Mar 17 '11 at 23:49
sed ':a          
N;/\nReceiver/{
P;D
}          
s/\n/X/;ta'
share|improve this answer

As written, that will join the second line to the first, then go to the third line and join the fourth to it, etc.

sed ':b; /^$/n; N; s/.\n\(.\)/\t\1/; tb'

should loop appending non-empty lines. (Corrected to actually catch blank lines in runs.)

share|improve this answer
    
just like SiegeX, your solution is appending all the records in my inbound on one single line. Not what I am trying to accomplish. Please see the edit of my OP. Thanks. –  Chris Mar 16 '11 at 23:31
    
Mine should have stopped appending at blank lines. I conclude it has a bug I missed. –  geekosaur Mar 16 '11 at 23:39

cat file | tr '\n' '\t' will work, too

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3  
UUOC (Useless Use Of Cat). Just use redirection instead. It prevents both another process and a pipe –  SiegeX Mar 16 '11 at 21:17

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