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public int attack(Bear bear)
{
    int newStamina=bear.getStamina() - 50;  
    bear.setStamina(newStamina);
    return bear.getStamina();
}

To extend on my fabulous Bear class, I've decided to implement an attack(!) method.

I have 2 instances of my bear object: Bear1 and Bear2.

In my head:

Bear1.attack(Bear2);

then my code gets Bear2 current stamina value and takes away 50 from it, assigning it to the newStamina variable.

Bear2 then gets passed this new stamina variable with the setStamina method.

I then return Bear2's current stamina, after the brutal bear attack.

This works, sort of. But I imagine there's a far better way.

Anyhoo. What I would like to do is, after:

int newStamina=bear.getStamina() - 50;

is:

if(newStamina <= 0)
{
    // the bear is dead!
}

Now my method attack returns an int, because if the bear doesn't die, it still has HP and I would like to output this current HP to the console or where ever.

If the bear is out of stamina, then I need to return something that signifies this.

What would you do? I can't return false, and I'm not sure that would work anyway.

share|improve this question
1  
I can't give you any pointers - Java doesn't have pointers, silly!! –  corsiKa Mar 16 '11 at 21:29
    
But in reference to the first method, it can be simplified to a single return statement. return bear.stamina-=50; –  Captain Giraffe Mar 16 '11 at 21:32
    
@Captain Giraffe - that makes sense I suppose, seems like I'm overcomplicating things. @user384706 - I think you understand my question better than I do! –  calum Mar 16 '11 at 21:35
    
You just need to remember that the private modifier applies to the class not the object. So since attack is a member of Bear it can access the private attributes of the argument bear. Glowcoder has a good point though. –  Captain Giraffe Mar 16 '11 at 21:40
    
Waaa, horrible idea imho. Don't misuse operations with side effects in such a way, it only makes the code less readable. The code is just fine and should hold up to most coding standards I've seen so far. –  Voo Mar 16 '11 at 21:42

7 Answers 7

up vote 0 down vote accepted

A good rule of thumb is only modify instance variables inside set methods. Doing this will keep your code more manageable.

/**
 * reduce this bears stamina by the given amount
 */
public void reduceStamina(int reduction) {
    setStamina(getStamina() - reduction);
}

public void isDead() {
    return getStamina() < 0;
}

public void attack(Bear otherBear) {
    otherBear.reduceStamina(50);
    if(otherBear.isDead()) {
        this.victoryDance();
    }
}
share|improve this answer
    
Fine code, except that it should be getStamine() <= 0 - a bear with 0HP should be dead as well ;) –  Voo Mar 16 '11 at 21:42
    
@Voo depends on the game. Actually some games you don't die until -20 HP or something similar. Between 0 and -20 you're merely unconscious. In any event, implementation details are left as EFTR. –  corsiKa Mar 16 '11 at 21:45
    
@Downvoter care to explain why you've downvoted? –  corsiKa Mar 16 '11 at 21:54

I've tried this - returning an object instead of an int.

public Bear attack(Bear bear)
{
        int newStamina=bear.getStamina() - 50;  
        bear.setStamina(newStamina);
        if(newStamina<=0)
        {
            bear.isDead=true;
        }
        return bear;
}

// in main
while(Bear2.isDead==false)
{
            Bear1.attack(Bear2);
            System.out.println(Bear2.getStamina());
}

if(Bear2.isDead)
{
    System.out.println(Bear2.getName() + " is dead :(");
}

that seems to work..! will be interested to see other solutions.

share|improve this answer
    
In this code, you don't use the return value at all, so you could simply let it be void, and ommit the return line. –  Paŭlo Ebermann Mar 16 '11 at 21:51

From an OOP point of view, I would separate the Object "Bear" with its attribute "stamina" from the Object "Fight", which holds two bears and handles the attack and "still alive". I published some examples to a quite similar question some weeks ago: help with changing arrays into individual variables in Java

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From an OOP point of view, everything should be an object. Attack which inherit from Action, Bear inherit from Animal which inherit from Living and.... but as I see, it might be too abstract for the this question –  Jean-Christophe Fortin Mar 17 '11 at 3:58

Instead of int you could return an Integer. In case the bear is dead you could return null.

public Integer attack(Bear attackedBear){
    Integer resultingStamina;
    ...
    if(resultingStamina<=0){
        resultingStamina = null;
    }
    return null;
}
share|improve this answer

that may do the job for you :

public int attack(Bear bear)
    {
        int newStamina=bear.getStamina() - 50;  
        bear.setStamina(newStamina);
        if(newStamina<=0)
        {
          bear.isDead=true;
        }
        return bear
    }

and in your main you verify if the returned bear still has stamina if not GAME OVER ...

share|improve this answer
public static void main()
{    
      Bear b1 = new bear();
      Bear b2 = new bear();
      while(!b2.IsDead())
      {
            b1.attack(b2);
            System.out.println(b2.getStamina());
      }

      System.out.println(b2.getName() + " is dead :(");
}



public class Bear
{
    private int _stamina;

    public int getStamina()
    {
          return _stamina;
    }

    public bool Isdead()
    {
          return _stamina == 0;
    }

    public void sufferAttack(int dommage)
    {
      _stamina = dommage > _stamina ? 0:(_stamina - dommage);
    }

    public void attack(Bear b)
    {
         b.sufferAttack(50);
    }
}

Now the reason.

First of all. Never expose internals attributes.Following the Demeters law, Nothing but the object itself should be able to change his current state.

Second, It make no sense to return an int(the stamina of the b2). B1 attack b2 and it a b1's method that return b2 stamina ? No. B1 have the responsibility to attack b1 and b2 the responsibility to suffer the attack and to provide a way to expose his current state.

You have to think about the responsibility of every class (and every method) before returning any kind of value.

When a bear attack I expect another bear to suffer an attack and when a bear suffer an attack I expect it to loose some stamina.

share|improve this answer
    
FYI while(b2.isDead==false) can be expressed as while(!b2.isDead) –  Steve Kuo Mar 17 '11 at 0:32
    
If the bear doesn't die by an attack, you may never notice, because you tried to define dead as stamina == 0. It's safer to say "stamina <= 0", so when you implement the "getHitByCar()" method, you don't have to think of zeroing exactly again. –  Jan Galinski Mar 17 '11 at 9:34

Something like this:

return new Pair <Integer, Boolean> (newStamina, bear.isAlive());

Not so good: return 2 ints, one representing the bool:

return new int [] {newStamina, bear.isAlive() ? 1 : 0};
share|improve this answer
1  
both are bad style. Whenever you have to deal with multible return values, you should ask yourself: where is the flaw in my design? –  Jan Galinski Mar 16 '11 at 21:35
1  
I'm not the downvoter, but returning a Pair<> is a bad idea, and a lot of people agree: tech.puredanger.com/2010/03/31/do-we-want-a-java-util-pair –  corsiKa Mar 16 '11 at 21:36
1  
I didn't recommend that design, I'm not even sure I understood the question right. But every Object which isn't a simple int, double, char is a kind of combined object. If you don't like OOP, you shouldn't use Java in the first place. If one has a more concrete thing than just this Pair, he should use it. –  user unknown Mar 16 '11 at 21:40
    
@glowcoder: Did you ever work with a ResultSet (jdbc)? What else is it, if not a tuple? But I will read that text; maybe I'm missing here something. –  user unknown Mar 16 '11 at 21:42
    
You should not use Pair in OO language. There isn't any pair in real life. BTW, I'm the downvoter. –  Stas Kurilin Mar 16 '11 at 21:42

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