Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I'm trying to re-learn C++ and was wondering if anyone could help me out here. I'm trying to implement my own String class to see if I can remember things, but I'm stuck on the constructor.

I have my header file and want to have a constructor as so:

Header File (MyFiles\String.h):

#ifndef STRING_
#define STRING_

using namespace std;
#include <iostream>

class String
{
  private:

    static const unsigned int MAX = 32;    // Capacity of string

    char Mem[MAX];    // Memory to hold characters in string
    unsigned Len;     // Number of characters in string

  public:

    // Construct empty string
    //
    String()
    {
      Len = 0;
    }

    // Reset string to empty
    //
    void reset()
    {
      Len = 0;
    }

    // Return status information
    //
    bool empty() const
    {
      return Len == 0;
    }

    unsigned length() const
    {
      return Len;
    }

    // Return reference to element I
    //
    char& operator[]( unsigned I )
    {
      return Mem[I];
    }

    // Return constant reference to element I
    //
    const char& operator[]( unsigned I ) const
    {
      return Mem[I];
    }

    // Construct string by copying existing string
    //
    String( const String& );

    // Construct string by copying array of characters
    //
    String( const char [] );

    // Copy string to the current string
    //
    String& operator=( const String& );

    // Append string to the current string
    //
    String& operator+=( const String& );
};

// Compare two strings
//
bool operator==( const String&, const String& );
bool operator!=( const String&, const String& );

// Put a string into an output stream
//
ostream& operator<<( ostream&, const String& );

#endif

The bit I'm stuck on is this:

String::String(const String& str)
{
    //what goes here?
}

Thanks!

share|improve this question
5  
The world really would be nicer without another string class... –  Kornel Kisielewicz Mar 16 '11 at 23:21
6  
@Kornel: the point of the exercise is to learn, not to replace std::string. –  Marcelo Cantos Mar 16 '11 at 23:24

3 Answers 3

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Well, since it's a learning exercise.

I think you want to copy the contents of the other string here since this is a copy constructor. So you will want to copy across all the member variables. In your case the copy constructor is not necessary because you've got a static array. If you had dynamic memory (i.e. used new to allocate pointer to Mem) then you'd need this. However, to show you how it's done, here you go.

String::String(const String& str)
{
    //what goes here?
    assert(str.Len < MAX);  // Hope this doesn't happen.
    memcpy(Mem, str.Mem, str.Len);
    Len = str.Len;
}
share|improve this answer
1  
I should clarify, there is a default copy constructor defined that by default copies all member variables. If you have dynamic memory then you need to define a copy constructor. –  Matt Mar 16 '11 at 23:33
2  
+1, this is what I was going to say, although I would emphasise the key point - don't implement a copy ctor or copy assignment operator when the default already does the right thing. There's a possible optimization, that copying just Len bytes saves some copying for short strings, but 32 bytes isn't enough that I'd worry about it. –  Steve Jessop Mar 16 '11 at 23:38

You need to copy the data from str to this. The length is easy:

Len = str.Len; // or, equiv. this->Len= str.Len

The data is a little harder. You might use strcpy or memcpy, or even a for loop.

memcpy(Mem, str.Mem, sizeof Mem);

Good luck!

share|improve this answer
    
Minor point, That memcpy copies the whole mem array including those beyond Len that are not part of the string but are in the array. –  Matt Mar 16 '11 at 23:36

I concur with Kornel Kisielewicz: the fewer hand-rolled String classes, the better. But you're only doing this to learn, so fair enough :-). Anyway: your copy constructor needs to copy over the length and the contents of the Mem array, and that's it.

(If you were doing this to make something useful rather than as a learning exercise, I'd add: a string class with a fixed maximum string length -- especially one as small as 32 characters -- is a very bad idea indeed. But it's entirely reasonable if you don't feel like dealing with memory allocation and deallocation at the same time as you're trying to remember the even-more-basics...)

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.