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Update: I realize that I put the question very badly. Here's a second run.

Consider the following function:

myList = []
optimumList = []

def findOptimumListItems():
    n = 5

    for i in range (n + 1):
        for j in range (n + 1 - i):
            myList.append((i, j, n-i-j))

    for i in myList:
        win = 0.0
        draw = 0.0
        for j in myList:
            score = 0
            if (i[0] > j[0]):
                score += 1
            if (i[0] == j[0]):
                score += 0.5
            if (i[1] > j[1]):
                score += 1
            if (i[1] == j[1]):
                score += 0.5
            if (i[2] > j[2]):
                score += 1
            if (i[2] == j[2]):
                score += 0.5  
            if (score == 2):
                win += 1
            if (score == 1.5):
                draw += 1
        if (win/(len(myList)-win-draw) > 1.0):
            optimumList.append(i)

    return optimumList

First I make a list. For n = 5 the generated list is:

[(0, 0, 5), (0, 1, 4), (0, 2, 3), (0, 3, 2), (0, 4, 1),
 (0, 5, 0), (1, 0, 4), (1, 1, 3), (1, 2, 2), (1, 3, 1),
 (1, 4, 0), (2, 0, 3), (2, 1, 2), (2, 2, 1), (2, 3, 0),
 (3, 0, 2), (3, 1, 1), (3, 2, 0), (4, 0, 1), (4, 1, 0),
 (5, 0, 0)]

Then, the function takes each element of the list and compares it with the list itself. This is how you do it: Say I'm comparing [0, 0, 5] against [3, 1, 1]. 0 loses to 3 (so no points), 0 loses to 1, so no points, 5 wins against 1 (1 point for that). A draw gets 0.5 points, a win gets 1 point. For any item, if wins are more than loses then that item is considered optimum and is added to the optimum list.

For n = 5, the optimum list is:

[(0, 2, 3), (0, 3, 2), (1, 1, 3), (1, 2, 2), (1, 3, 1), (2, 0, 3),
 (2, 1, 2), (2, 2, 1), (2, 3, 0), (3, 0, 2), (3, 1, 1), (3, 2, 0)]

My question is: How can I write the above function in a concise way? I'm especially interested in functional algorithms. Python, Ruby, Java, Haskell answers will be appreciated. (Having said that, if you have a neat solution in any language; that's okay.)

Sorry for repeating the same question. I agree that the original question was messy and hard to understand. I hope it's clear now.

Update (upon rampion's comment): Is there an efficient algorithm for this (or this type) problem?

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1  
Ok, I'm still confused. What are item_, item_0, and item_n? –  senderle Mar 17 '11 at 0:41
    
This would be clearer if you said things like myList[0][0], myList[0][1], etc -- using normal (for Python) nested list syntax. –  senderle Mar 17 '11 at 0:42
    
No score for when the different items are equal? –  Dan Burton Mar 17 '11 at 16:47
    
This is much better. See my new answer below. –  senderle Mar 18 '11 at 20:00

5 Answers 5

up vote 4 down vote accepted

Second Update: Great -- now I understand exactly what you want. This does the same thing as the code in your most recent edit:

def optimize(myList):
    score_tup = lambda tup_a, tup_b: sum(1.0 if a > b else 0.5 if a == b else 0 for a, b in zip(tup_a, tup_b))
    scores = ((tup_a, [score_tup(tup_a, tup_b) for tup_b in myList]) for tup_a in myList)
    scores = ((tup, score.count(2), score.count(1.5)) for tup, score in scores)
    return [tup for tup, win, draw in scores if (win * 1.0 / (len(myList) - win - draw)) > 1.0]

a = 5
myList = [(i, j, a-i-j) for i in range(a + 1) for j in range(a + 1 - i)]
print myList
print optimize(myList)

If you want to see previous versions of this answer, check the edits; this was getting too long.

share|improve this answer
    
why not just: myList = [(i, j, a-1-i-j) for i in range(10) for j in range(a - i)] –  newacct Mar 18 '11 at 5:20
    
@newacct, yes, I tried that, and it didn't work the way I expected. But I just tried what you typed, and it works. So I must have made a mistake when I tried it the first time. I'll edit... –  senderle Mar 18 '11 at 13:26

in Haskell:

optimize :: Int -> [(Int,Int,Int)]
optimize n = filter optimal [ (a,b,c) | a <- [0..n], b <- [0..(n-a)], let c = n - a - b ]
  where optimal x = (>0) . sum $ map (comp x) xs
        comp (a,b,c) (a',b',c') = signum $ vs a a' + vs b b' + vs c c'
        vs x x' = case compare x x' of
                    GT -> 1
                    EQ -> 0
                    LT -> -1

Though this is fairly concise, it's not very efficient (we compare (0,3,2) with (0,2,3) and vice versa, when we only need to do that once).

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks, rampion. –  blackened Mar 17 '11 at 22:19

This isn't done yet, but it's a good start, I think.

It's written in Ruby.

>> l = [1,2,3]
>> l.map {|n| l.map{|i| i > n ? 1 : 0.5 }}.flatten.inject(0){|start, n| start + n}
=> 6.0
share|improve this answer
1  
You can also use .inject(:+) instead of .inject(0){|start, n| start += n}. (and += should be just +) –  Guilherme Bernal Mar 17 '11 at 0:13
    
Thanks, I edited the post. –  Oleander Mar 18 '11 at 20:45

What is this for? Comparing each item in the list with every other item in the list will take an extremely large time ( O(n^2), I believe), especially as the list grows in size. If you give us some context, we may be able to tell you a better way to do this.

Anyway, here's what I came up with for comparing all of your items:

>>> for i in range(len(myList)):
...     for x in range(len(myList)):
...             if x != i:
...                     if myList[i][0] > myList[x][0]:
...                             score += 1
...                     if myList[i][0] < myList[x][0]:
...                             score += .5
... 

Untested, as it never finished running, so there may be a mistake.

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If I'm doing this correctly the comparison function is non-transformative, and what is returned is the same list you had before the comparison. That being said my functional program for generating the list is

def triple_tuple_generator(a):
    """Given an integer 'a', returns a generator of triple tuples of length 'a(a-1), where the tuple values are over the range 'a-1=i' (i,i-1,a-2*i+1)."""
    for i in range(a):
        for j in range(a-1):
            yield (i,j,a-1-i-j)

This is a generator so consume as you wish. If I was good enough at working with summations I would prove my hunch, but I'm a physicist not a mathematician. ;) Let me know if I got this right.

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