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I have a few questions about this function from John Resig's exercise #19 in http://ejohn.org/apps/learn/#19

  1. what is the purpose of the second last line getElements.cache = {}; Is it storing return results in an array?

  2. If my guess in (1) is correct, is it only catching return results because, in the "else" section of the function, getElements.cache[name] = results;?

  3. when I played with the code in the console in the tutorial, I removed the line getElements.cache[name] = results from the "else" section, but still got the same result, as when it was there--namely, it told me that there were 76 elements. What, therefore, is the purpose of this line getElements.cache[name] = results if it`s not necessary to get the result?

  4. is there any significance to the fact that, in the "else" section of the function, the order of the line getElements.cache[name] = results; is reversed from the if section of the code, where it says results = getElements.cache[name]

  5. finally, is cache a pre-defined function in JavaScript? I can't find it in the documentation.

function getElements( name ) { 
  var results; 

  if ( getElements.cache[name] ) { 
    results = getElements.cache[name]; 
  } else { 
    results = document.getElementsByTagName(name); 
    getElements.cache[name] = results; 
  } 

  return results; 
} 
getElements.cache = {}; 

log( "Elements found: ", getElements("pre").length );
share|improve this question
up vote 4 down vote accepted

a) The second to last line establishes that the property "cache" on the object getElements is an object. Essentially initializing that property.

b) That would be the cache, think of getElements as an object and the cache is a hash that is holding on to results.

c) Yes, you'll still get the same result because the cache is just caching, it's not changing the answer in anyway, it'll just potentially speed things up.

d) Yes, one is storing a result into the cache, the other is pulling a result out of the cache.

e) No this is a custom property that was defined for "getElements", any number of these with different names could be defined.

share|improve this answer
    
thank you very much. regarding (d) which one is storing a result into the cache? and which one is pulling a result out of the cache? regarding (e), was this custom property defined "behind the scenes" somewhere? i.e. I don`t see any code that creates this property. – mjmitche Mar 17 '11 at 1:51
    
d the if statement with "result = getElements.cache[name]" is copying the value in the cache. Regarding (e), see (a). That was the definition. – Myles Mar 17 '11 at 1:59
1  
Why initializing that property isn't strictly necessary?(from a)) If you don't you can't use getElements.cache[name] because the function doesn't have the cache property yet. But I think the cache property can be omitted by just using getElements[name]. – Gnijuohz Aug 6 '12 at 7:07
    
@Gnijuohz That's a good question. Not sure what I was thinking at the time, but that does need to be initialized to make it an array. I have edited the post accordingly. – Myles Aug 6 '12 at 14:11

1.- what is the purpose of the second last line getElements.cache = {}; Is it storing return results in an array?

It's just initializing the object

2.- If my guess in (1) is correct, is it only catching return results because, in the "else" section of the function, getElements.cache[name] = results;?

Yes, its using a cache method to avoid accessing the DOM.

3.- when I played with the code in the console in the tutorial, I removed the line getElements.cache[name] = results from the "else" section, but still got the same result, as when it was there--namely, it told me that there were 76 elements. What, therefore, is the purpose of this line getElements.cache[name] = results if it`s not necessary to get the result?

It's not really necessary in the sense that it's only making the function return faster, since accessing an object it's faster than transversing the DOM.

4.- is there any significance to the fact that, in the "else" section of the function, the order of the line getElements.cache[name] = results; is reversed from the if section of the code, where it says results = getElements.cache[name]

In the else section, first, the results variable is assigned a value with the actual result, then the result is being cached. In the then section, the results variable is just being assigned the cached value. No need to re-cache it

5.- finally, is cache a pre-defined function in JavaScript? I can't find it in the documentation.

It's not predefined. It's being used as a property for this particular function (in JavaScript functions are first class objects and can store values in properties.

Here is the code commented:

function getElements( name ) { 
  var results; 

  if (getElements.cache[name]) { 
    results = getElements.cache[name]; // Use the cached value
  } else { 
    results = document.getElementsByTagName(name); // Get the desired value
    getElements.cache[name] = results; // cache the result
  } 

  return results; 
} 

getElements.cache = {}; // Initialize the cache
share|improve this answer
    
thank you. regarding 3, if getElements.cache[name] = results had been removed, the desired value would have been stored in the variable results. When you mention "traversing the Dom," are you referring to the fact that the desired value needs to be pulled out of the variable? – mjmitche Mar 17 '11 at 2:01
    
The line "document.getElementsByTagName(name);" is getting information from the DOM (the Document Object Model, i.e. the internal representation of the HTML) which is a tree and getting info out of it is more expensive than just reading an object's property. – Marcelo Mar 17 '11 at 2:09
    
o.k., thank you very much, but that raises another question. But since "document.getElementsByTagName(name)" is in the code, isnt the function doing both. i.e. "accessing the object" (with the cache) AND "traversing the DOM" (with the getElementByID? If the purpose of the cache was to make it less expensive than traversing the Dom, why does the function do both? isnt that even more expensive? Wouldn`t the cheapest thing to have been to leave out the document. getElementsByTag(name)? – mjmitche Mar 17 '11 at 2:14
    
It will only do it once, the first time. It will get the info from the DOM and store it in the cache (property assignment is not expensive.) The second time it will just find out the value is already in the cache and just read it from there. I suppose you could try profile it making a function that makes 100K calls to the function with and without caching and see if there is a difference. Theoretically it should ;) – Marcelo Mar 17 '11 at 2:21
    
o.k., Its clear now. I didnt realize the (obvious) purpose of the cache was for multiple calls. thank you very much for your help. – mjmitche Mar 17 '11 at 2:23

An alternative caching function

// Were going to get some things.
var getSomeThings = function() {
    // Calling something expense to get the things.
    var things = somethingExpensive();
    // overwriting this function with a function that returns things
    getSomeThings = function() {
         return things;
    }
    // call the new function that returns things and return things.
    return getSomeThings();
};

First time this gets called you calculate things and return it. The second, third, ... this gets called you just return things.

The other example allows you to cache it with a parameter which is different but a similar idea. This means your caching a whole bunch of things rather then just one.

[Edit]

What this does is creates a variable called getSomeThings. Then assigns a it a function. When you call the function it has access to getSomeThings itself as a variable and can set it with a new function.

For example:

function getSomethingExpensive() {
     ...
     return 42;
}
var b = function() {
     b = getSomethingExpensive();
}    
b();
alert(b);
share|improve this answer
    
thank you very much. could you explain in a little more detail how it skips over the calculating part in the second and third call. How does the function getSomeThings =function() { return things; } actually "overwrite" the somethingExpensive() function? – mjmitche Mar 17 '11 at 2:08
    
@mjmitche see edit. Your not overwriting somethingExpensive your overwriting getSomeThings itself so it never calls somethingExpensive more then once. – Raynos Mar 17 '11 at 2:12
    
thank you very much. got it now. – mjmitche Mar 17 '11 at 2:20

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