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I am picking up Scala recently. I have been used to C and Java before. I am wondering if there is a more elegant way of asking for input repeatedly until correct input is given.

val choiceType = {
      var in = ""
      var pass = false
      do {
    in = readLine()
    pass = in match {
        case "1" => println("Not implemented"); true
        case "2" => println("Not implemented"); true
        case "3" => println("Not implemented"); true
        case "4" => println("Not implemented"); true
        case "5" => println("Thanks for using."); true
        case _ => println("Error input. Please enter again. (Possible value: 1 - 5)"); false
    }
      } while (!pass)
      in.toInt
    }
    if (choiceType == 5) System.exit(0)

I am wondering if there is a better way of doing this in Scala?

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5 Answers

up vote 6 down vote accepted

You could use either Iterate.continually to do the same thing over and over again until you impose some stopping condition (with dropWhile), or you could use Iterator.iterate to give you the previous line in case you want to use it in your error message:

val choiceType = Iterator.iterate(readLine())(line => {
  println("Error input: "+line+".  Please enter again (from 1-5).)")
  readLine()
}).collect(line => line match {
  case "1" => println("Not implemented"); line
  case "2" => println("Not implemented"); line
  case "3" => println("Not implemented"); line
  case "4" => println("Not implemented"); line
  case "5" => println("Thanks for using."); line
}).next.toInt

The way this works is by starting with a readLine, and then if it needs another line it announces an error message based on the previous line (obviously that one was wrong) and reads another line. You then use a collect block to pick out your correct input; the wrong input just falls through without being collected. In this case, since you want to turn it into an integer, I'm just passing the line through. Now, we only want one good entry, so we get the next one and convert it to an int.

You could also use a recursive function to do a similar thing:

def getChoice: String = {
  val line = readLine()
  line match {
    case "1" => println("Not implemented"); line
    case "2" => println("Not implemented"); line
    case "3" => println("Not implemented"); line
    case "4" => println("Not implemented"); line
    case "5" => println("Thanks for using."); line
    case _ => println("Error, blah blah."); getChoice
  }
}
val choiceType = getChoice.toInt

Here the trick is that in the case where you get wrong input, you just call the function again. Since that's the last thing that happens in the function, Scala will avoid a true function call and just jump to the beginning again (tail-recursion), so you won't overflow the stack.

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Thank you. That's really a quite comprehensive explanation. The 1st example is a little bit complex while the 2nd example is much better. But they are both good examples. –  JohanSJA Mar 17 '11 at 4:24
    
Note that in the second example it would be better to write getChoice(): davetron5000.github.com/scala-style/method_invocation/arity0/… –  Alexey Romanov Mar 17 '11 at 5:01
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Recursion FTW, IMHO. Anyway, I'm gonna suggest a little modification upon Rex Kerr's recursive solution.

def getChoice: String = {
  val line = readLine()
  line match {
    case "1" | "2" | "3" | "4" => println("Not implemented"); line
    case "5" => println("Thanks for using."); line
    case _   => println("Error, blah blah."); getChoice
  }
}
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Agreed, or case x if ((1 to 4).exists(_.toString==x) => or somesuch. I assumed that the first thing the OP would do would be to fill in different values for 1-4, so I didn't condense them. Replicating the identical lines did make me wince a little, though. –  Rex Kerr Mar 17 '11 at 17:21
    
@Rex I assumed the same, actually. But it's quite likely he doesn't know of this alternative, since it's so little used and talked about. So, in fact, I'm just taking the opportunity to show something that he (and others) might not know about. –  Daniel C. Sobral Mar 17 '11 at 18:02
    
Good point. –  Rex Kerr Mar 17 '11 at 18:19
    
That's pretty neat by the way. I am trying to grasp some ideas on how to apply functional programming and immutable state whenever I can. –  JohanSJA Mar 17 '11 at 22:14
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import io.Source.stdin

val choices = stdin.getLines.collect {
  case "1" => println("Not implemented")
  case "2" => println("Not implemented")
  case "3" => println("Not implemented")
  case "4" => println("Not implemented")
  case "5" => println("Thanks for using.")
              System.exit(0)
}

choices.next
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Scala allows you to treat { case } blocks as instances of the PartialFunction trait. PartialFunction gives you a way to test whether the function is defined for a particular input. So you could rewrite like this:

val operation: PartialFunction[String, Unit] = {
  case "1" => println("Not implemented")
  case "2" => println("Not implemented")
  case "3" => println("Not implemented")
  case "4" => println("Not implemented")
  case "5" => println("Thanks for using."); System.exit(0)
}

var input: String = ""

do {
  input = readLine()
} while(!operation.isDefinedAt(input))

operation(input)

If you want to avoid having the mutable input variable, you can also use Iterator.continually() (turns an expression into an infinite Iterator which repeatedly evaluates the expression).

val operation = ... // as above
val input = Iterator.continually(readLine()).dropWhile(!operation.isDefinedAt(_)).next
operation(input)

And you can avoid having to give operation a name by using Iterator's collect method.

Iterator.continually(readLine()).collect {
  case "1" => println("one")
}.next
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Thanks for the reply. –  JohanSJA Mar 17 '11 at 4:26
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I would use a recursive function. Something like this:

def getChoice: Int = readLine match {
  case x if x < "6" && x > "0" && x.length == 1 => x.toInt
  case _ => println("Error, Possible values: (1 - 5)")
            getChoice
}
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You might want to edit that a little. I can break your code by entering 2blahblahblah. –  Rex Kerr Mar 17 '11 at 4:14
    
Fixed. Nice catch. –  dbyrne Mar 17 '11 at 4:22
    
Thanks for the reply. –  JohanSJA Mar 17 '11 at 4:25
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