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i'm designing a web site for a friend and i'm not sure what's the best way is to go in regards to one of my database tables. To give you an idea, this is roughly what i have

Table: member_profile
`UserID`
`PlanID`
`Company`
`FirstName`
`LastName`
`DOB`
`Phone`
`AddressID`
`website`
`AllowNonUserComments`
`AllowNonUserBlogComments`
`RequireCaptchaForNonUserComments`
`DisplayMyLocation`

the last four AllowNonUserComments AllowNonUserBlogComments RequireCaptchaForNonUserComments DisplayMyLocation

(and possibly more such boolean fields to be added in the future) will control certain website functionality based on user preference.

Basically i'm not sure if i should move those fields to a

new table : member_profile_settings

`UserID`
`AllowNonUserComments`
`AllowNonUserBlogComments`
`RequireCaptchaForNonUserComments`
`DisplayMyLocation`

or if i should just leave it be part of the member_profile table since every member is going to have their own settings.

The target is roughly 100000 members on the long run and 10k to 20k in the short run. My main concern is database performance.

And while i'm at it question #2) would it make sense to move contact information of the member such as address street, city, state, zip , phone etc into the member_profile table instead of having address table and having the AddressID like i currently have.

Thank you

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3 Answers 3

up vote 1 down vote accepted

I would say "no" and "yes, but" as the answers to 1) and 2). For #1, your queries are going to be a lot easier to manage if you create columns for each preference. The best systems I've worked with were done that way. Moving the preferences into a separate table with "user, preference, value" triples leads to complex queries that join multiple tables just to check a setting.

For #2: there's no reason to put the address in another table, because the single "AddressID" column means there's just one address per member, anyway, and again, it's just going to complicate the queries. If you turn it around backwards and have an address table that embeds userids then that might make sense; it makes even more sense to do phone numbers that way, since people often have multiple phone numbers.

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wow amazing . tnx for the quick reply. In regards to the address table. I forgot to mention that a user can have multiple addresses. Billing/shipping / address that will map to a user defined event taking place someplace .... etc . the addressID is just to map to default address (billing?), maybe i'll have another field in member_profile table such as Default_Shipping_AddressID. would this be a bad design? –  robert Mar 17 '11 at 4:14

If each member in the database has exactly ONE value for each of the attributes you have listed, then your database is already normalized and thus in a quite convenient form. So, to answer #1, moving these fields to a different table would improve nothing and just make querying more difficult.

As for #2, if you wanted to contemplate the possibility of a member having multiple addresses or phone numbers, you should definitely put those in different tables, allowing many-to-one relationships. This might also make sense if you expect that a number of users will share the same address; this way, you will not be duplicating information by having to store all the same address information for multiple users, you would just reference an addresses table that would have the relevant information one time per address.

However, if you need neither multiple addresses per member nor multiple members per address, then putting the addresses information in another table is just unnecessary complexity. Which solution is more convenient depends on the needs of your specific application.

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Since each member has exactly one value in this table, it's already normalized. However, considering query efficiency, sometimes denormalization should be considered.

Except the ID field, the others could seperate into 2 groups: profile group and settings group. If your website usaually use these two groups of data seperately, you should consider to have news table for different usage.

For example, if the profile fields only shows in profile page and the settings fields works in whole site, it's not necessary to look up profile fields all the time.

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