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Suppose I have two integer arrays a and b with 10 ints per array. Is there a way I can add the contents of b[i] to a[i] using some "memset" or "memcopy" trick? I'm just looking for something faster than the obvious for loop w/ a[i] += b[i] etc.

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Does it have to be portable? –  EmeryBerger Mar 17 '11 at 4:16
6  
Also, have you looked at the assembly code output? I am assuming you have profiled your code and determined that this matters. If not, stick with clarity. If so, look at the assembly -- at high optimization levels, you may be surprised by how good the resulting code is. –  EmeryBerger Mar 17 '11 at 4:18
    
The existing code is decently fast... however since it's for a game on a mobile device I want it to be as fast as I can make it. Also I'm just curious in general. Thanks for the responses :-) –  MrDatabase Mar 17 '11 at 4:23
1  
Like Emery says, good compilers will recognize the pattern and do the right thing. It is not exactly unusual to operate on two arrays. –  Bo Persson Mar 17 '11 at 8:42
1  
@Bo Persson: it's always possible to give the compiler a hand! See below ... –  Olof Forshell Mar 17 '11 at 8:57
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6 Answers

up vote 3 down vote accepted

"Silly" - I think it's an excellent question!

You say "adding" not "copying" and I'm assuming x86:

void addintvector (int *dstp, const int *srcp, int nints)
{
  int *endp;

  endp=dst+nints;
  nints=srcp-dstp;    // reuse nints

  while (dstp!=endp)
  {
    *dstp+=*(dstp+nints);    // makes use of the [base+index*4] x86 addressing
    dstp+=1;    // some prefer ++dstp but I don't when it comes to pointers
  }
}

The loop should translate into

add_label:
  mov eax,[ebx+esi*4]
  add [ebx],eax
  add ebx,4
  cmp ebx,edx
  jne add_label

That's five instructions per loop: it won't get much faster than that!

It's also easy to clone into subtract, divide and multiply variants.

Some speak of using a GPU but this requires that 1. the GPU interfaces with applications and 2. your array is large enough to overcome the associated overhead.

To overcome the call/return overhead you could experiment with declaring it inline.

Edit

I just read your comment "since it's for a game on a mobile device" and I guess it's not an x86 platform and therefore probably does not have a reg+reg*scale addressing mode. If that is the case the code should be written

void addintvector (int *dstp, const int *srcp, int nints)
{
  int *endp;

  endp=dst+nints;

  while (dstp!=endp)
  {
    *dstp+=*srcp;
    srcp+=1;
    dstp+=1;
  }
}

Not knowing which architecture you're targeting but assuming RISC I guess the code will be eight instructions long instead (in "unoptimized" psuedocode):

add_label:
  mov tempreg1,[srcreg]
  mov tempreg2,[dstreg]
  add tempreg2,tempreg1
  mov [dstreg],tempreg2
  add srcreg,4
  add dstreg,4
  cmp dstreg,endreg
  jne add_label
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Let me say that this is, at least for x86, a terrible idea. Gcc will vectorize a simple for-loop but in general, will not be able to do so when rewritten to use pointers. –  EmeryBerger Mar 17 '11 at 20:09
    
@EmeryBerger: Your comment is unclear since I cannot figure out if it is x86 in general or the combination of x86 and gcc. I assume that you mean that overall the generated gcc code will execute in (the equivalent of) less than five instructions per add. Also it is unclear whether this is your personal opinion or if it is an absolute truth. For the latter you should provide appropriate references. –  Olof Forshell Mar 18 '11 at 14:26
1  
try to compile a simple for-loop with -O3 for any processor with SSE. Look at the assembly code. You will find that it has replaced adds and memory operations with wide vector instructions, which are in general far faster. See gcc.gnu.org/projects/tree-ssa/vectorization.html –  EmeryBerger Mar 19 '11 at 16:43
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A simply addition loop will usually end up being fast enough, as the compiler will vectorize it: http://gcc.gnu.org/projects/tree-ssa/vectorization.html, outputting parallel instructions which will operate on four elements of the arrays at once.

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If the SIMD instructions in your CPU aren't fast enough, you may be able to vectorize at a larger scale with OpenCL on your GPU. –  David German Mar 17 '11 at 4:26
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Maybe it worth consider OpenCL. If you have a lot of vector or matrix tasks, let'm solve GPU. Take a look at sample with sum of vectors https://www.wiki.ed.ac.uk/display/ecdfwiki/OpenCL+quick+start

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2  
It's got to be big enough to matter though. There is overhead with sending the data over the bus to the GPU. I doubt it's a win for 10 ints. 1000 or more, maybe. –  Zan Lynx Mar 17 '11 at 5:32
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Agree. My approach makes sense, for example, if one has a lot of pairs of vectors to add the same time. Then it is possible to combine 10-elementh vectors into a big one and send it to GPU –  Oleg Svechkarenko Mar 17 '11 at 6:07
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If you are willing to use "pure" C there are variadic macros in C99. Use P99 for unrolling:

#include "p99_for.h"
#define ADDIT(Y, X, I) X[I] += Y[I]
#define ADD_MORE(Y, X, N) P99_FOR(Y, N, P00_SEP, ADDIT, P99_DUPL(N, X))

A line like

ADD_MORE(A, B, 3);

Then expands to

B[0] += A[0]; B[1] += A[1]; B[2] += A[2];
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An std::valarray seems like a good choice.

#include <valarray>
#include <algorithm>
#include <iostream>
#include <iterator>

int main()
{
    std::valarray<int> a(3, 10);
    std::valarray<int> b(4, 10);

    std::valarray<int> result = a + b;

    std::copy(&result[0], &result[0] + result.size(), 
        std::ostream_iterator<int>(std::cout, " "));

    return 0;
}

a and b are arrays with ten elements, 3 and 4 respectively. Adding two valarrays performs an element-wise addition. There are many other arithmetical operations defined for valarrays.

You would have to test if this is any faster than an explicit loop. Since valarrays are designed for such operations, the implementation might be in some way optimized.

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Not that I know of.

Is the obvious loop slow enough that you really do need something "faster"? How could you improve on it?

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Why do you question his reasons for asking the question? -1 –  Olof Forshell Mar 17 '11 at 9:07
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