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How to use my own GPL code in a non-GPL application?

Hello,

If i create a program which uses GPL licensed C libraries, do i have to give users access to the source code of "my" program as well as the source code of any GPL Licensed C libraries?

Also, if i created my own library, licensed it as GPL and then included & used that library in one of my proprietary (closed source) programs, can i do that?

Also could i make my own GPL licensed library (distribute it..), then use the same code to create a proprietary version (closed source), can i do that?

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marked as duplicate by James McNellis, Thilo, Jeff Atwood Mar 20 '11 at 8:03

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5 Answers 5

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If i create a program which uses GPL licensed C libraries, do i have to give users access to the source code of "my" program as well as the source code of any GPL Licensed C libraries?

It depends. If you distribute your program and those GPL libraries together, then the answer is unquestionably yes - you would need to also provide the source for the complete package, which would include your code. This is because in order to distribute those GPL libraries, you must have a license to do so, and if this license is the GPL then you must follow its provisions.

However, if you merely distribute your program by itself, and require your users to find a suitable library to run it on their own, then it would hinge on whether or not your program was deemed to be a "derivative work" of the library, which is something of a gray area.

Also, if i created my own library, licensed it as GPL and then included & used that library in one of my proprietary (closed source) programs, can i do that?

If you created your own library, and it is entirely your own work, then you can do whatever you want with it, even if you release it under the GPL. Licensing it under the GPL gives rights to other people; it doesn't (and can't) restrict your own rights to your own code. The GPL is effective through copyright law, and it makes no sense to accuse yourself of copyright infringement.

Also could i make my own GPL licensed library (distribute it..), then use the same code to create a proprietary version (closed source), can i do that?

As per above, yes, you can do that - as long as you own the copyright to the entire library. If you accept a patch from someone else though, licensed under the GPL, then you couldn't include their work in your proprietary version, unless that contributor gave you a seperate license to do so (or assigned the copyright to you).

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IANAL

If I create a program which uses GPL licensed C libraries, do I have to give users access to the source code of "my" program as well as the source code of any GPL Licensed C libraries?

Yes

Also, if I created my own library, licensed it as GPL and then included & used that library in one of my proprietary (closed source) programs, can I do that?

Yes

Also could I make my own GPL licensed library (distribute it..), then use the same code to create a proprietary version (closed source), can I do that?

Yes

With the last two, you can't stop people who have the GPL licensed version of the code from using that code; once you've released it, it is available to anyone who obtains it in perpetuity. But you, as copyright holder, can also release it under other licences. (And if no-one bothered to download the GPL version, then you can remove it without any problem, and relicense it as you please.)

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I was looking at: flowplayer.org/download/index.html and looks like they have a GPL licensed version AND a commercial version. But in the GPL version they require their branding visible? can they do this? –  Daniel Mar 17 '11 at 6:42
1  
@Daniel: they think so. Superficially, they might well be correct, but IANAL and I am not going to pontificate on the matter because I've not re-read the GPL v3 recently enough. –  Jonathan Leffler Mar 17 '11 at 6:49

Yes, since C can invoke the linking clause. Many people prefer to go with a license at least as liberal as LGPL for just this reason.

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1  
That's only if your code isn't a derived work. ie if you use only the public interface to the code and keep it separate. If however you use significant parts of the GPL code in your work then your work becomes GPL. Significant is of course upto the courts –  Martin Beckett Mar 17 '11 at 6:39

Also, if i created my own library, licensed it as GPL and then included & used that library in one of my proprietary (closed source) programs, can i do that?

Yes, you can license the code to yourself (or anyone else) with other licenses in addition to the GPL. Of course, you need to be the sole copyright holder for the code in question (or get the agreement of all the others).

In fact, that is why many companies like the GPL and AGPL (for their own open source projects), because they can still sell commercial licenses. With the more liberal licenses, nothing stops companies to use them for free.

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If i create a program which uses GPL licensed C libraries, do i have to give users access to the source code of "my" program as well as the source code of any GPL Licensed C libraries?

Yes.

Also, if i created my own library, licensed it as GPL and then included & used that library in one of my proprietary (closed source) programs, can i do that?

You own your own library. Whether your release it to the public as GPL is irrelevant to what you can do with it as the legal copyright owner. So no, you would not have to release your project code that used your own GPL code.

PS: I am not a lawyer; everything I know could be wrong.

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Everything you know could be wrong, even (especially?) if you were a lawyer. ;-) –  Thilo Mar 17 '11 at 6:10
    
Can't afford a lawyer, all i need to know is if i license one of my own C,C++ libraries as gpl, can i use that in my closed source (NON GPL) programs without releasing the source to my closed source program –  Daniel Mar 17 '11 at 6:13
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@Daniel - yes you still own the program, the GPL is just granting rights to others. If however you accept improvements from other you have to get them to agree to you having those rights –  Martin Beckett Mar 17 '11 at 6:37

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