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#include <iostream> 
#include <vector>
using namespace std;

class Base
{
public:
      void Display( void )
      {
            cout<<"Base display"<<endl;
      }

      int Display( int a )
      {
            cout<<"Base int display"<<endl;
            return 0;
      }

};

class Derived : public Base
{
public:

      void Display( void )
      {
            cout<<"Derived display"<<endl;
      }
};


void main()
{
   Derived obj;
   obj.Display();  
   obj.Display( 10 );
}

$test1.cpp: In function ‘int main()’:  
test1.cpp:35: error: no matching function for call to ‘Derived::Display(int)’  
test1.cpp:24: note: candidates are: void Derived::Display()

On commenting out obj.Display(10), it works.

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What compiler are you using ? It looks like gcc but is this the most recent code ? Why you get $test1.cpp: In function ‘int main()’: even though you have defined main as void main() ? –  GeorgeAl Mar 17 '11 at 8:09
    
tried with gcc and vc++. Copied code from the vc++ editor, pasted gcc output. –  Ganesh Kundapur Mar 17 '11 at 8:14

3 Answers 3

up vote 2 down vote accepted

You need to place -

using Base::Display ; // in Derived class

If a method name is matched in the Derived class, compiler will not look in to the Base class. So, to avoid this behavior, place using Base::Display;. Then the compiler will look into the Base class if there is any method that can actually take int as argument for Display.

class Derived : public Base
{
    public:
    using Base::Display ;
    void Display( void )
    {
        cout<<"Derived display"<<endl;
    }
};
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1  
is this something compiler-specific? –  Nathan Fellman Mar 17 '11 at 8:06
1  
It works with the using. Could you please explain me whats happening without the using? –  Ganesh Kundapur Mar 17 '11 at 8:08
    
Shouldn't int Display(int) get derived anyway as it's declared as public. –  Shamim Hafiz Mar 17 '11 at 8:10
    
@Gunner : Its gets derived but is hidden in the derived class. –  Prasoon Saurav Mar 17 '11 at 8:15
1  
@Gunner : For historical reasons. Read my answer. –  Prasoon Saurav Mar 17 '11 at 8:18

You need to use the using declaration. A member function named f in a class X hides all other members named f in the base classes of X.

Why?

Read this explanation by AndreyT

You can bring in those hidden names by using a using declaration:

using Base::Display is what you need to include in the derived class.

Furthermore void main() is non-standard. Use int main()

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2  
He has defined main as void main() but how come he gets $test1.cpp: In function ‘int main()’: ? –  GeorgeAl Mar 17 '11 at 8:07
5  
@Muggen: It's illegal to declare main as having a return type of anything other than int. This particular implementation seems to just ignore this error and treat the code as if it declared main correctly. –  Charles Bailey Mar 17 '11 at 8:11

You are masking the original function definition by creating a function in the derived class with the same name: http://www.parashift.com/c++-faq-lite/strange-inheritance.html#faq-23.8

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