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I had problem in my other code and huge, but I had made one prototype here,

this code is suppose to alert "hello John" instead of "hello undefined"

<html xmlns="http://www.w3.org/1999/xhtml">
<head>
    <title></title>
    <script src="jquery.min.js" type="text/javascript"></script>
    <script type="text/javascript" language="javascript">
        function callMethod(data, callback) {
            return callback(data);
        }

        function client(divid) {
            this.init = function () {
                $(this.divid).click((function (context) {
                    return function () {
                        callMethod("hello ", context.method);
                    }
                })(this));
            }
            this.divid = "#" + divid;
            this.myname = "John";
            this.method = function (d) {
                alert(d + this.myname);
            }
            this.init();
        }

        $('document').ready(function () {
            new client("mydiv");
        });
    </script>
</head>
<body>
    <div id="mydiv">This is my div</div>
</body>
</html>

can some body point out me why I'm getting unexpected result here?

I'm getting unexpected result on

this.method = function (d) {
    alert(d + this.myname);
}

this.myname suppose to return "John" here.

How to access class instance in event hanlder (JavaScript)? I'm getting help from above link, but I'm not being able to solve

share|improve this question
up vote 1 down vote accepted

This worked:

function callMethod(data, callback) {
    return callback(data);
}

function client(divid) {
    this.init = function() {
        $(this.divid).click((function(context) {
            return function() {
                callMethod("hello ", context.method);
            }
        })(this));
    }
    this.divid = "#" + divid;
    this.myname = "John";
    this.method = function(d) {
        alert(d + this.myname);
    }
    this.init();
}
$('document').ready(function() {
    client("mydiv");
});

Update:

You have to return the function object if you want to create different instances of it:

function callMethod(data, callback) {
    return callback(data);
}

function client(divid) {
    this.init = function() {
        $(this.divid).click((function(context) {
            return function() {
                callMethod("hello ", context.method);
            }
        })(this));
    }
    this.divid = "#" + divid;
    this.myname = "John";
    this.method = function(d) {
        alert(d + this.myname);
    }
    this.init();
    return this;
}
$('document').ready(function() {
    var x = client("mydiv");
    alert(x.divid);
    alert(x.myname); 
});
share|improve this answer
    
what output you are getting? – Pravat -Mujah Maskey Mar 17 '11 at 9:47
    
he's getting right – Santosh Linkha Mar 17 '11 at 9:47
    
thanks Brandon, can you tell me why we are not putting "new" keyboards here?, if I want to make many instances like in OOP, can you give me idea here, how I can make new object here? I want to make many instance like , var x = new client("mydiv"); var y = new client("otherdiv"); – Pravat -Mujah Maskey Mar 17 '11 at 9:54
    
@Pravat I'm not too familiar with using the new word, but you were not returning the function as an object before. this.init() does not initiate the parent function as an object, it just calls the internal init function. – bcm Mar 17 '11 at 10:18
    
@Pravat You may be interested in this article which speaks in depth about the 'new' in JavaScript - dustindiaz.com/new-in-javascript – bcm Mar 17 '11 at 10:22

I got solved here is code

<html xmlns="http://www.w3.org/1999/xhtml">
<head>
    <title></title>
    <script src="jquery.min.js" type="text/javascript"></script>
    <script type="text/javascript" language="javascript">
        function callMethod(data, callback) {
            return callback(data);
        }

        function client(divid) {
            this.init = function () {
                $(this.divid).click(function () {
                    callMethod("hello ", c.method);
                });
            }
            this.divid = "#" + divid;
            this.myname = "John";
            this.method = function (d) {
                alert(d + c.myname + $(c.divid).html());
            }
            this.init();
            var c = this;
        }

        $('document').ready(function () {
            new client("mydiv");
            new client("nextdiv");
        });            
    </script>
</head>
<body>
    <div id="mydiv">This is my div</div>
    <br />
    <div id="nextdiv">Next Div</div>
</body>
</html>

actually this small line of code

var c = this;

is playing role. cheers up ;) , we don't need to event take care of "context" also

and we can make multiple instance too. test case:

 $('document').ready(function () {
      var x = new client("mydiv");
      var y = new client("nextdiv");
      alert("id of x is : " + x.divid + "\n id or y is : " + y.divid);
  });
share|improve this answer

This is an alternative way of coding which I find easier to understand/maintain.

Whatever is available to the public after object init can be seen more easily in the return section. I've left the greet function as public and customisable.

function client(divid) {
    var ids = divid;
    var target = $('#' + ids);
    var content = target.html();
    var myname = "John";

    function getID() {
        return ids;
    }

    function greet(d) {
        var d = d || '';
        alert('Hello ' + d + myname + ', ' + content);
    }

    target.click(function() {
        customName(d);
    })

    return {
        getID: getID,
        greet: greet
    }
}


$(function() {
    var x = new client('mydiv');
    var y = new client('nextdiv');
    //alert("id of x is : " + x.getID() + " and y is : " + y.getID());
    //x.greet('E ');    
    x.greet();
});
share|improve this answer
1  
@Pravat Understanding more from: addyosmani.com/resources/essentialjsdesignpatterns/book The constructor pattern which u used was mentioned. Check out prototyping also to avoid redefining function for each object initiated. – bcm Mar 19 '11 at 15:53
    
BCM : very much thanks for link, I found very usefull too. – Pravat -Mujah Maskey Mar 21 '11 at 4:07
    
again, on this function target.click(function() { customName(d); }), how you will use private properties and methods ? – Pravat -Mujah Maskey Mar 21 '11 at 4:11

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