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How can I get the Cartesian product (every possible combination of values) from a group of lists?

Input:

somelists = [
   [1, 2, 3],
   ['a', 'b'],
   [4, 5]
]

Desired output:

[(1, 'a', 4), (1, 'a', 5), (1, 'b', 4), (1, 'b', 5), (2, 'a', 4), (2, 'a', 5) ...]
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6  
be aware that 'every possible combination' is not quite the same as 'Cartesian product', since in Cartesian products, duplicates are allowed. –  Triptych Feb 10 '09 at 20:08
1  
Is there a non duplicate version of cartesian product? –  KJW Nov 13 '13 at 5:32

6 Answers 6

up vote 69 down vote accepted

In Python 2.6+

import itertools
for element in itertools.product(*somelists):
    print element
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7  
Just wanted to add the '*' character is required if you use the variable somelists as provided by the OP. –  brian buck Jan 13 '11 at 22:51
import itertools
>>> for i in itertools.product([1,2,3],['a','b'],[4,5]):
...         print i
...
(1, 'a', 4)
(1, 'a', 5)
(1, 'b', 4)
(1, 'b', 5)
(2, 'a', 4)
(2, 'a', 5)
(2, 'b', 4)
(2, 'b', 5)
(3, 'a', 4)
(3, 'a', 5)
(3, 'b', 4)
(3, 'b', 5)
>>>
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For Python 2.5 and older:

>>> [(a, b, c) for a in [1,2,3] for b in ['a','b'] for c in [4,5]]
[(1, 'a', 4), (1, 'a', 5), (1, 'b', 4), (1, 'b', 5), (2, 'a', 4), 
 (2, 'a', 5), (2, 'b', 4), (2, 'b', 5), (3, 'a', 4), (3, 'a', 5), 
 (3, 'b', 4), (3, 'b', 5)]

Here's a recursive version of product() (just an illustration):

def product(*args):
    if not args:
        return iter(((),)) # yield tuple()
    return (items + (item,) 
            for items in product(*args[:-1]) for item in args[-1])

Example:

>>> list(product([1,2,3], ['a','b'], [4,5])) 
[(1, 'a', 4), (1, 'a', 5), (1, 'b', 4), (1, 'b', 5), (2, 'a', 4), 
 (2, 'a', 5), (2, 'b', 4), (2, 'b', 5), (3, 'a', 4), (3, 'a', 5), 
 (3, 'b', 4), (3, 'b', 5)]
>>> list(product([1,2,3]))
[(1,), (2,), (3,)]
>>> list(product([]))
[]
>>> list(product())
[()]
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The recursive version doesn't work if some of args are iterators. –  J.F. Sebastian Feb 10 '09 at 21:43
1  
I vote up for the list comprehension one. Maybe next time it would be nice (for you) to post different answers, can you? –  Gra Jun 22 '11 at 20:58

In Python 2.6 and above you can use 'itertools.product`. In older versions of Python you can use the following (almost -- see documentation) equivalent code from the documentation:

def product(*args, **kwds):
    # product('ABCD', 'xy') --> Ax Ay Bx By Cx Cy Dx Dy
    # product(range(2), repeat=3) --> 000 001 010 011 100 101 110 111
    pools = map(tuple, args) * kwds.get('repeat', 1)
    result = [[]]
    for pool in pools:
        result = [x+[y] for x in result for y in pool]
    for prod in result:
        yield tuple(prod)

The result of both is an iterator, so if you really need a list for furthert processing, use list(result).

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Per the documentation, the actual itertools.product implementation does NOT build intermediate results, which could be expensive. Using this technique could get out of hand quite quickly for moderately sized lists. –  Triptych Feb 10 '09 at 20:05
2  
i can only point the OP to the documentation, not read it for him. –  hop Feb 10 '09 at 20:19
2  
i forgot... programmers are babies –  hop Feb 10 '09 at 20:29
    
The code from the documentation is meant to demonstrate what the product function does, not as a workaround for earlier versions of Python. –  Triptych Mar 10 '09 at 21:07
2  
your point being? –  hop Mar 10 '09 at 22:37

with itertools.product:

import itertools
result = list(itertools.product(*somelists))
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Here is a recursive generator, which doesn't store any temporary lists

def product(ar_list):
    if not ar_list:
        yield ()
    else:
        for a in ar_list[0]:
            for prod in product(ar_list[1:]):
                yield (a,)+prod

print list(product([[1,2],[3,4],[5,6]]))

Output:

[(1, 3, 5), (1, 3, 6), (1, 4, 5), (1, 4, 6), (2, 3, 5), (2, 3, 6), (2, 4, 5), (2, 4, 6)]
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