Stack Overflow is a community of 4.7 million programmers, just like you, helping each other.

Join them; it only takes a minute:

Sign up
Join the Stack Overflow community to:
  1. Ask programming questions
  2. Answer and help your peers
  3. Get recognized for your expertise

How can I get the Cartesian product (every possible combination of values) from a group of lists?

Input:

somelists = [
   [1, 2, 3],
   ['a', 'b'],
   [4, 5]
]

Desired output:

[(1, 'a', 4), (1, 'a', 5), (1, 'b', 4), (1, 'b', 5), (2, 'a', 4), (2, 'a', 5) ...]
share|improve this question
7  
be aware that 'every possible combination' is not quite the same as 'Cartesian product', since in Cartesian products, duplicates are allowed. – Triptych Feb 10 '09 at 20:08
2  
Is there a non duplicate version of cartesian product? – KJW Nov 13 '13 at 5:32
2  
@KJW Yes, set(cartesian product) – NoBugs Feb 12 '15 at 7:04
up vote 116 down vote accepted

In Python 2.6+

import itertools
for element in itertools.product(*somelists):
    print element

Documentation: Python 2 - itertools.product

share|improve this answer
12  
Just wanted to add the '*' character is required if you use the variable somelists as provided by the OP. – brian buck Jan 13 '11 at 22:51
    
any idea the efficiency of the itertools.product() code? I assume it's been optimized, but just curious (and I don't know how to calculate it from the docs page...) – jaska Aug 12 '15 at 8:56
    
@jaska: product() generates nitems_in_a_list ** nlists elements in the result (reduce(mul, map(len, somelists))). There is no reason to believe that yielding a single element is not O(nlists) (amortized) i.e., the time complexity is the same as for simple nested for-loops e.g., for the input in the question: nlists=3, total number of elements in the result: 3*2*2, and each element has nlists items (3 in this case). – J.F. Sebastian Aug 14 '15 at 22:08
    
What is the use of * before somelists? What does it do? – Vineet Kumar Doshi Aug 25 '15 at 9:04
3  
@VineetKumarDoshi: Here it is used to unpcak a list into multiple arguments to the function call. Read more here: stackoverflow.com/questions/36901/… – Moberg Sep 15 '15 at 6:20
import itertools
>>> for i in itertools.product([1,2,3],['a','b'],[4,5]):
...         print i
...
(1, 'a', 4)
(1, 'a', 5)
(1, 'b', 4)
(1, 'b', 5)
(2, 'a', 4)
(2, 'a', 5)
(2, 'b', 4)
(2, 'b', 5)
(3, 'a', 4)
(3, 'a', 5)
(3, 'b', 4)
(3, 'b', 5)
>>>
share|improve this answer

For Python 2.5 and older:

>>> [(a, b, c) for a in [1,2,3] for b in ['a','b'] for c in [4,5]]
[(1, 'a', 4), (1, 'a', 5), (1, 'b', 4), (1, 'b', 5), (2, 'a', 4), 
 (2, 'a', 5), (2, 'b', 4), (2, 'b', 5), (3, 'a', 4), (3, 'a', 5), 
 (3, 'b', 4), (3, 'b', 5)]

Here's a recursive version of product() (just an illustration):

def product(*args):
    if not args:
        return iter(((),)) # yield tuple()
    return (items + (item,) 
            for items in product(*args[:-1]) for item in args[-1])

Example:

>>> list(product([1,2,3], ['a','b'], [4,5])) 
[(1, 'a', 4), (1, 'a', 5), (1, 'b', 4), (1, 'b', 5), (2, 'a', 4), 
 (2, 'a', 5), (2, 'b', 4), (2, 'b', 5), (3, 'a', 4), (3, 'a', 5), 
 (3, 'b', 4), (3, 'b', 5)]
>>> list(product([1,2,3]))
[(1,), (2,), (3,)]
>>> list(product([]))
[]
>>> list(product())
[()]
share|improve this answer
    
The recursive version doesn't work if some of args are iterators. – J.F. Sebastian Feb 10 '09 at 21:43
1  
I vote up for the list comprehension one. Maybe next time it would be nice (for you) to post different answers, can you? – Gra Jun 22 '11 at 20:58

In Python 2.6 and above you can use 'itertools.product`. In older versions of Python you can use the following (almost -- see documentation) equivalent code from the documentation:

def product(*args, **kwds):
    # product('ABCD', 'xy') --> Ax Ay Bx By Cx Cy Dx Dy
    # product(range(2), repeat=3) --> 000 001 010 011 100 101 110 111
    pools = map(tuple, args) * kwds.get('repeat', 1)
    result = [[]]
    for pool in pools:
        result = [x+[y] for x in result for y in pool]
    for prod in result:
        yield tuple(prod)

The result of both is an iterator, so if you really need a list for furthert processing, use list(result).

share|improve this answer
    
Per the documentation, the actual itertools.product implementation does NOT build intermediate results, which could be expensive. Using this technique could get out of hand quite quickly for moderately sized lists. – Triptych Feb 10 '09 at 20:05
2  
i can only point the OP to the documentation, not read it for him. – hop Feb 10 '09 at 20:19
2  
i forgot... programmers are babies – hop Feb 10 '09 at 20:29
    
The code from the documentation is meant to demonstrate what the product function does, not as a workaround for earlier versions of Python. – Triptych Mar 10 '09 at 21:07
2  
your point being? – hop Mar 10 '09 at 22:37

with itertools.product:

import itertools
result = list(itertools.product(*somelists))
share|improve this answer
1  
What is the use of * before somelists? – Vineet Kumar Doshi Aug 25 '15 at 9:04

Here is a recursive generator, which doesn't store any temporary lists

def product(ar_list):
    if not ar_list:
        yield ()
    else:
        for a in ar_list[0]:
            for prod in product(ar_list[1:]):
                yield (a,)+prod

print list(product([[1,2],[3,4],[5,6]]))

Output:

[(1, 3, 5), (1, 3, 6), (1, 4, 5), (1, 4, 6), (2, 3, 5), (2, 3, 6), (2, 4, 5), (2, 4, 6)]
share|improve this answer
1  
They're stored in the stack, though. – Quentin Pradet Mar 16 '15 at 11:09
    
@QuentinPradet do you mean a generator like def f(): while True: yield 1 will keep on increasing its stack size as we go through it? – Anurag Uniyal Mar 16 '15 at 22:42
    
no, but def f(): yield 1; f() will, right? – Quentin Pradet Mar 17 '15 at 10:09
    
@QuentinPradet yeah, but even in this case only the stack needed for max depth, not the whole list, so in this case stack of 3 – Anurag Uniyal Mar 17 '15 at 16:14
    
It's true, sorry. A benchmark could be interesting. :) – Quentin Pradet Mar 17 '15 at 18:24

Just to add a bit to what has already been said: if you use sympy, you can use symbols rather than strings which makes them mathematically useful.

import itertools0
import sympy

x, y = sympy.symbols('x y')

somelist = [[x,y], [1,2,3], [4,5]]
somelist2 = [[1,2], [1,2,3], [4,5]]

for element in itertools.product(*somelist):
  print element
share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.