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What would be your suggestion in order to create a single instance application, so that only one process is allowed to run at a time? File lock, mutex or what?

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2  
The C language has no concepts for this. You must specify in which environment you want to do this, since the solution is going to be specific to that environment. –  unwind Mar 17 '11 at 12:51
    
Main concern is linux environment –  whoi Mar 17 '11 at 12:56

10 Answers 10

up vote 41 down vote accepted

A good way is:

#include <sys/file.h>
#include <errno.h>

int pid_file = open("/var/run/whatever.pid", O_CREAT | O_RDWR, 0666);
int rc = flock(pid_file, LOCK_EX | LOCK_NB);
if(rc) {
    if(EWOULDBLOCK == errno)
        ; // another instance is running
}
else {
    // this is the first instance
}

Note that locking allows you to ignore stale pid files (i.e. you don't have to delete them). When the application terminates for any reason the OS releases the file lock for you.

Pid files are not terribly useful because they can be stale (the file exists but the process does not). Hence, the application executable itself can be locked instead of creating and locking a pid file.

A more advanced method is to create and bind a unix domain socket using a predefined socket name. Bind succeeds for the first instance of your application. Again, the OS unbinds the socket when the application terminates for any reason. When bind() fails another instance of the application can connect() and use this socket to pass its command line arguments to the first instance.

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flock is nonstandard. Use fcntl or lockf locking. –  R.. Mar 17 '11 at 13:42
2  
Fair point, although we are talking Linux here. –  Maxim Egorushkin Mar 17 '11 at 14:46
    
There is no need to use flock, and you need to check the results of the open() to see if it succeeded. If it worked, you run, if it fails because the file already exists, then you know another instance is running. –  psusi Sep 15 '11 at 15:11
10  
@psusi: a) if open() fails flock() fails as well, hence no need to check the result of open(); b) the file may exist but it may be stale, need to lock it to check if the process exists. –  Maxim Egorushkin Sep 15 '11 at 15:48
1  
@Gauthier tldp.org/LDP/Linux-Filesystem-Hierarchy/html/…: /tmp: This directory contains mostly files that are required temporarily. Many programs use this to create lock files and for temporary storage of data... –  Maxim Egorushkin Feb 4 at 9:22

Avoid file-based locking

It is always good to avoid a file based locking mechanism to implement the singleton instance of an application. The user can always rename the lock file to a different name and run the application again as follows:

mv lockfile.pid lockfile1.pid

Where lockfile.pid is the lock file based on which is checked for existence before running the application.

So, it is always preferable to use a locking scheme on object directly visible to only the kernel. So, anything which has to do with a file system is not reliable.

So the best option would be to bind to a inet socket. Note that unix domain sockets reside in the filesystem and are not reliable.

Alternatively, you can also do it using DBUS.

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1  
On the other hand, with an inet socket, a user could open that socket before the application, to prevent it from being able to run (a DOS-type attack). So that's not fool-proof either. File-based locking can be made secure with suitable permissions set up on a filesystem. But inet sockets don't have permissions to control who can open them. –  Craig McQueen May 29 at 4:53

For windows, a named kernel object (e.g. CreateEvent, CreateMutex). For unix, a pid-file - create a file and write your process ID to it.

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It's seems to not be mentioned - it is possible to create a mutex in shared memory but it needs to be marked as shared by attributes (not tested):

pthread_mutexattr_t attr;
pthread_mutexattr_init(&attr);
pthread_mutexattr_setpshared(&attr, PTHREAD_PROCESS_SHARED);
pthread_mutex_t *mutex = shmat(SHARED_MEMORY_ID, NULL, 0);
pthread_mutex_init(mutex, &attr);

There is also shared memory semaphores (but I failed to find out how to lock one):

int sem_id = semget(SHARED_MEMORY_KEY, 1, 0);
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semop() is used for locking and unlocking System V semaphores, which semget() will return. (POSIX semaphores--man sem_overview--are usually preferable.) –  David Duncan Jun 5 at 4:10

Here is a solution in C++. It uses the socket recommendation of Maxim. I like this solution better than the file based locking solution, because the file based one fails if the process crashes and does not delete the lock file. Another user will not be able to delete the file and lock it. The sockets are automatically deleted when the process exits.

Usage:

int main()
{
   SingletonProcess singleton(5555); // pick a port number to use that is specific to this app
   if (!singleton())
   {
     cerr << "process running already. See " << singleton.GetLockFileName() << endl;
     return 1;
   }
   ... rest of the app
}

Code:

#include <netinet/in.h>

class SingletonProcess
{
public:
    SingletonProcess(uint16_t port0)
            : socket_fd(-1)
              , rc(1)
              , port(port0)
    {
    }

    ~SingletonProcess()
    {
        if (socket_fd != -1)
        {
            close(socket_fd);
        }
    }

    bool operator()()
    {
        if (socket_fd == -1 || rc)
        {
            socket_fd = -1;
            rc = 1;

            if ((socket_fd = socket(AF_INET, SOCK_DGRAM, 0)) < 0)
            {
                throw std::runtime_error(std::string("Could not create socket: ") +  strerror(errno));
            }
            else
            {
                struct sockaddr_in name;
                name.sin_family = AF_INET;
                name.sin_port = htons (port);
                name.sin_addr.s_addr = htonl (INADDR_ANY);
                rc = bind (socket_fd, (struct sockaddr *) &name, sizeof (name));
            }
        }
        return (socket_fd != -1 && rc == 0);
    }

    std::string GetLockFileName()
    {
        return "port " + std::to_string(port);
    }

private:
    int socket_fd = -1;
    int rc;
    uint16_t port;
};
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Worked great :) –  Rik Feb 3 at 10:05

It will depend on which problem you want to avoid by forcing your application to have only one instance and the scope on which you consider instances.

For a deamon -- the usual way is to have a /var/run/app.pid file.

For user application, I've had more problems with applications which prevented me to run them twice than with being able to run twice an application which shouldn't have been run so. So the answer on "why and on which scope" is very important and will probably bring answer specific on the why and the intended scope.

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You can create an "anonymous namespace" AF_UNIX socket. This is completely Linux-specific, but has the advantage that no filesystem actually has to exist.

Read the man page for unix(7) for more info.

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The correct terminology is "abstract namespace" (and abstract socket addresses). –  Urhixidur Jun 10 at 19:20

No one has mentioned it, but sem_open() creates a real named semaphore under modern POSIX-compliant OSes. If you give a semaphore an initial value of 1, it becomes a mutex (as long as it is strictly released only if a lock was successfully obtained).

With several sem_open()-based objects, you can create all of the common equivalent Windows named objects - named mutexes, named semaphores, and named events. Named events with "manual" set to true is a bit more difficult to emulate (it requires four semaphore objects to properly emulate CreateEvent(), SetEvent(), and ResetEvent()). Anyway, I digress.

Alternatively, there is named shared memory. You can initialize a pthread mutex with the "shared process" attribute in named shared memory and then all processes can safely access that mutex object after opening a handle to the shared memory with shm_open()/mmap(). sem_open() is easier if it is available for your platform (if it isn't, it should be for sanity's sake).

Regardless of the method you use, to test for a single instance of your application, use the trylock() variant of the wait function (e.g. sem_trywait()). If the process is the only one running, it will successfully lock the mutex. If it isn't, it will fail immediately.

Don't forget to unlock and close the mutex on application exit.

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Unfortunately it seems that there's no way for POSIX semaphores to be "cleaned up" if a process is killed — unlike for lock files or sockets where the OS will close files or sockets if the process is killed. See The Problem with POSIX Semaphores. –  Craig McQueen May 29 at 2:01

Based on the hints in maxim's answer here is my POSIX solution of a dual-role daemon (i.e. a single application that can act as daemon and as a client communicating with that daemon). This scheme has the advantage of providing an elegant solution of the problem when the instance started first should be the daemon and all following executions should just load off the work at that daemon. It is a complete example but lacks a lot of stuff a real daemon should do (e.g. using syslog for logging and fork to put itself into background correctly, dropping privileges etc.), but it is already quite long and is fully working as is. I have only tested this on Linux so far but IIRC it should be all POSIX-compatible.

In the example the clients can send integers passed to them as first command line argument and parsed by atoi via the socket to the daemon which prints it to stdout. With this kind of sockets it is also possible to transfer arrays, structs and even file descriptors (see man 7 unix).

#include <stdio.h>
#include <stddef.h>
#include <stdbool.h>
#include <stdlib.h>
#include <unistd.h>
#include <errno.h>
#include <signal.h>
#include <sys/socket.h>
#include <sys/un.h>

#define SOCKET_NAME "/tmp/exampled"

static int socket_fd = -1;
static bool isdaemon = false;
static bool run = true;

/* returns
 *   -1 on errors
 *    0 on successful server bindings
 *   1 on successful client connects
 */
int singleton_connect(const char *name) {
    int len, tmpd;
    struct sockaddr_un addr = {0};

    if ((tmpd = socket(AF_UNIX, SOCK_DGRAM, 0)) < 0) {
        printf("Could not create socket: '%s'.\n", strerror(errno));
        return -1;
    }

    /* fill in socket address structure */
    addr.sun_family = AF_UNIX;
    strcpy(addr.sun_path, name);
    len = offsetof(struct sockaddr_un, sun_path) + strlen(name);

    int ret;
    unsigned int retries = 1;
    do {
        /* bind the name to the descriptor */
        ret = bind(tmpd, (struct sockaddr *)&addr, len);
        /* if this succeeds there was no daemon before */
        if (ret == 0) {
            socket_fd = tmpd;
            isdaemon = true;
            return 0;
        } else {
            if (errno == EADDRINUSE) {
                ret = connect(tmpd, (struct sockaddr *) &addr, sizeof(struct sockaddr_un));
                if (ret != 0) {
                    if (errno == ECONNREFUSED) {
                        printf("Could not connect to socket - assuming daemon died.\n");
                        unlink(name);
                        continue;
                    }
                    printf("Could not connect to socket: '%s'.\n", strerror(errno));
                    continue;
                }
                printf("Daemon is already running.\n");
                socket_fd = tmpd;
                return 1;
            }
            printf("Could not bind to socket: '%s'.\n", strerror(errno));
            continue;
        }
    } while (retries-- > 0);

    printf("Could neither connect to an existing daemon nor become one.\n");
    close(tmpd);
    return -1;
}

static void cleanup(void) {
    if (socket_fd >= 0) {
        if (isdaemon) {
            if (unlink(SOCKET_NAME) < 0)
                printf("Could not remove FIFO.\n");
        } else
            close(socket_fd);
    }
}

static void handler(int sig) {
    run = false;
}

int main(int argc, char **argv) {
    switch (singleton_connect(SOCKET_NAME)) {
        case 0: { /* Daemon */

            struct sigaction sa;
            sa.sa_handler = &handler;
            sigemptyset(&sa.sa_mask);
            if (sigaction(SIGINT, &sa, NULL) != 0 || sigaction(SIGQUIT, &sa, NULL) != 0 || sigaction(SIGTERM, &sa, NULL) != 0) {
                printf("Could not set up signal handlers!\n");
                cleanup();
                return EXIT_FAILURE;
            }

            struct msghdr msg = {0};
            struct iovec iovec;
            int client_arg;
            iovec.iov_base = &client_arg;
            iovec.iov_len = sizeof(client_arg);
            msg.msg_iov = &iovec;
            msg.msg_iovlen = 1;

            while (run) {
                int ret = recvmsg(socket_fd, &msg, MSG_DONTWAIT);
                if (ret != sizeof(client_arg)) {
                    if (errno != EAGAIN && errno != EWOULDBLOCK) {
                        printf("Error while accessing socket: %s\n", strerror(errno));
                        exit(1);
                    }
                    printf("No further client_args in socket.\n");
                } else {
                    printf("received client_arg=%d\n", client_arg);
                }

                /* do daemon stuff */
                sleep(1);
            }
            printf("Dropped out of daemon loop. Shutting down.\n");
            cleanup();
            return EXIT_FAILURE;
        }
        case 1: { /* Client */
            if (argc < 2) {
                printf("Usage: %s <int>\n", argv[0]);
                return EXIT_FAILURE;
            }
            struct iovec iovec;
            struct msghdr msg = {0};
            int client_arg = atoi(argv[1]);
            iovec.iov_base = &client_arg;
            iovec.iov_len = sizeof(client_arg);
            msg.msg_iov = &iovec;
            msg.msg_iovlen = 1;
            int ret = sendmsg(socket_fd, &msg, 0);
            if (ret != sizeof(client_arg)) {
                if (ret < 0)
                    printf("Could not send device address to daemon: '%s'!\n", strerror(errno));
                else
                    printf("Could not send device address to daemon completely!\n");
                cleanup();
                return EXIT_FAILURE;
            }
            printf("Sent client_arg (%d) to daemon.\n", client_arg);
            break;
        }
        default:
            cleanup();
            return EXIT_FAILURE;
    }

    cleanup();
    return EXIT_SUCCESS;
}
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I have just written one, and tested.

#define PID_FILE "/tmp/pidfile"
static void create_pidfile(void) {
    int fd = open(PID_FILE, O_RDWR | O_CREAT | O_EXCL, 0);

    close(fd);
}

int main(void) {
    int fd = open(PID_FILE, O_RDONLY);
    if (fd > 0) {
        close(fd);
        return 0;
    }

    // make sure only one instance is running
    create_pidfile();
}
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This has a significant problem; what happens if the second process does its check after the first process's check, but before the first process creates? –  Matt McNabb Jun 25 '14 at 3:51

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