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I got some C code:

typedef struct {
    size_t len;
    size_t alloclen;
    char *buf;
} str;

void strnappnd(str **s, const char *buf, size_t n) {

    if ((*s)->len + n >= (*s)->alloclen) {
        size_t nalloclen = (*s)->len + n + 1;
        void *tmp = realloc((*s)->buf, nalloclen);
        if (!tmp) {
            printf("failure");
            exit(-1);
        }
        (*s)->buf = tmp;
        (*s)->alloclen = nalloclen;
    }
    memccpy((*s)->buf + (*s)->len, buf, '\0', n);
    (*s)->len += n;
    (*s)->buf[(*s)->len] = '\0';
}

void strfree(str **s) {
    free((*s)->buf);
    free(*s);
    *s = NULL;
}

Apparently, the strnappnd leaks at the realloc line. Why?

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2  
@user282635 Do you eventually free (*s)->buf after the final realloc? –  NPE Mar 17 '11 at 12:58
1  
@aix: I think the use of realloc means you don't need to free the buffer. –  Nick Mar 17 '11 at 13:00
2  
How are you detecting the leaks? –  Nick Mar 17 '11 at 13:01
2  
The important thing is that the string is not appended when there is already enough space. –  pmg Mar 17 '11 at 13:03
2  
Three points: 1) function names cannot start with "str", that's a reserved name space; 2) consider growing the buffer by more than 1 byte, if this is for general-purpose, to amortise the cost of multiple appends better; 3) as @pmg said, there seems to be code lacking for the case where the buffer is large enough. Factor it out of the realloc()-path. –  unwind Mar 17 '11 at 13:05

4 Answers 4

up vote 0 down vote accepted

Consider:

void f() {
  str *s = (str *)malloc(sizeof(str));
  s->len = 5;
  s->alloclen = 5;
  s->buf = strdup("Hello");
  strnappend(&s, " World!", 7);
  free(s); /* courtesy of Eric */
}

If you had something like that, the memory allocated by realloc() would leak as f() is left.

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1  
And the memory allocated by malloc() as well. –  Erik Mar 17 '11 at 13:04
    
I think a better example would be where an instance of str is allocated on the stack. –  Nick Mar 17 '11 at 13:06
    
@Erik: I think as far as memory checkers go, the memory allocated by the malloc() call would be associated with the realloc() call. So technically, as far as memory checkers go, only realloc() leaked (again, I'm just guessing). I believe this is because realloc() may not be able to just extend the already allocated memory chunk in size due to memory fragmentation. Instead, it may have to release the memory and allocate a totally new chunk of the requested size. –  Frerich Raabe Mar 17 '11 at 13:08
    
@Frerich: I'm talking about the malloc in your first line :) –  Erik Mar 17 '11 at 13:09
    
@Frerich: No, the realloc is called on s->buf rather than s itself. –  Nick Mar 17 '11 at 13:10

If you wrote

(*s)->buf = realloc((*s)->buf, nalloclen)

that would be a memory leak, because if realloc fails and returns NULL, you lose the (*s)->buf pointer, which is still pointing to allocated memory.

Since you exit on failure it's not a problem, but maybe your static analyser ignores the exit?

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I updated my code, it's still leaking though. –  ryyst Mar 17 '11 at 14:51
    
@user282635 – What is telling you that the realloc leaks? Some sort of static analyser? Valgrind? –  aaz Mar 17 '11 at 15:42
    
No, I run the code (pretty much just what I posted) in a loop and the memory usage grows and grows... –  ryyst Mar 17 '11 at 15:49
    
@user282635 – You should post the rest of the program because the memory handling in these two functions looks fine. –  aaz Mar 17 '11 at 16:11

Like this mtrace said "No memory leaks"

char *strnappnd(str **s, const char *buf, size_t n) {
    ...
    return (*s)->buf;
}
void strfree(str *s){
    free(s->buf);
    free(s);
}

using the sample code given by Frerich

void f() {
  str *s = (str *)malloc(sizeof(str));
  s->len = 5;
  s->alloclen = 5;
  s->buf = strdup("Hello");
  s->buf = strnappend(&s, " World!", 7);
  strfree(s);
}
share|improve this answer

You create strfree() function and it is not used inside the code. The memory need to be free always, if it is not used.

if (!tmp) {
    printf("failure");
    if (!(*s) && !((*s)->buf))
       strfree(&(*s));
    exit(-1);
}

Looking strfree(), looks as you reserved memory for *s too in somewhere. Do the same before your code finish.

if (!(*s) && !((*s)->buf))
   strfree(&(*s));
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