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I know the answer is not going to be simple, and I already use a couple of (I think ugly) cludges. I am simply looking for some elegant answers.

Abstract class:

public interface IOtherObjects;

public abstract class MyObjects<T> where T : IOtherObjects
{
   ...

   public List<T> ToList()
   {
       ...
   }
}

Children:

public class MyObjectsA : MyObjects<OtherObjectA> //(where OtherObjectA implements IOtherObjects)
{


}

public class MyObjectsB : MyObjects<OtherObjectB> //(where OtherObjectB implements IOtherObjects)
{


}

Is it possible, looping through a collection of MyObjects (or other similar grouping, generic or otherwise) to then utilise to ToList method of the MyObjects base class, as we do not specifically know the type of T at this point.

EDIT As for specific examples, whenever this has come up, I've thought about it for a while, and done something different instead, so there is no current requirement. but as it has come up quite frequently, I thought I would float it.

EDIT @Sara, it's not the specific type of the collection I care about, it could be a List, but still the ToList method of each instance is relatively unusable, without an anonymous type)

@aku, true, and this question may be relatively hypothetical, however being able to retrieve, and work with a list of T of objects, knowing only their base type would be very useful. Having the ToList returning a List Of BaseType has been one of my workarounds

EDIT @ all: So far, this has been the sort of discussion I was hoping for, though it largely confirms all I suspected. Thanks all so far, but anyone else, feel free to input.

EDIT@Rob, Yes it works for a defined type, but not when the type is only known as a List of IOtherObjects.

@Rob Again Thanks. That has usually been my cludgy workaround (no disrespect :) ). Either that or using the ConvertAll function to Downcast through a delegate. Thanks for taking the time to understand the problem.

QUALIFYING EDIT in case I have been a little confusing

To be more precise, (I may have let my latest implementation of this get it too complex):

lets say I have 2 object types, B and C inheriting from object A.

Many scenarios have presented themselves where, from a List of B or a List of C, or in other cases a List of either - but I don't know which if I am at a base class, I have needed a less specific List of A.

The above example was a watered-down example of the List Of Less Specific problem's latest incarnation.

Usually it has presented itself, as I think through possible scenarios that limit the amount of code that needs writing and seems a little more elegant than other options. I really wanted a discussion of possibilities and other points of view, which I have more or less got. I am surprised no one has mentioned ConvertAll() so far, as that is another workaround I have used, but a little too verbose for the scenarios at hand

@Rob Yet Again and Sara

Thanks, however I do feel I understand generics in all their static contexted glory, and did understand the issues at play here.

The actual design of our system and usage of generics it (and I can say this without only a touch of bias, as I was only one of the players in the design), has been done well. It is when I have been working with the core API, I have found situations when I have been in the wrong scope for doing something simply, instead I had to deal with them with a little less elegant than I like (trying either to be clever or perhaps lazy - I'll accept either of those labels).

My distaste for what I termed a cludge is largely that we require to do a loop through our record set simply to convert the objects to their base value which may be a performance hit.

I guess I was wondering if anyone else had come across this in their coding before, and if anyone had been cleverer, or at least more elegant, than me in dealing with it.

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Can you include what you are exactly trying to do, e.g., what code have you tried using that hasn't worked? –  Jon Limjap Sep 10 '08 at 4:19
    
John, Probably in this concrete case when ToList implementation is the same for both classes compiler could be a bit more intelligent. But it's the way it is, you should use standard means - interfaces or inheritance from base class. –  aku Sep 10 '08 at 4:50
    
John, just ignore those downvoters, I see nothing wrong in you question. However, you should give some example of your code usage to make you it more clear. –  aku Sep 10 '08 at 5:19
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7 Answers

up vote 1 down vote accepted

If you have

class B : A
class C : A

And you have

List<B> listB;
List<C> listC;

that you wish to treat as a List of the parent type

Then you should use

List<A> listA = listB.Cast<A>().Concat(listC.Cast<A>()).ToList()
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why do you have a collection of MyObjects? Is there a specific reason you don't have a List?

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In all, I have to agree. This is just bad design. –  Frank Krueger Sep 10 '08 at 5:41
    
I think I would third this.. If my latest response is correct, I would not be happy with the design of it. –  Rob Cooper Sep 10 '08 at 5:53
    
I am using the term Collection generically, not specifically –  johnc Sep 18 '08 at 23:25
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In your case MyObjectsA and MyObjectsB don't have common predecessor. Generic class is template for different classes not a common base class. If you want to have common properties in different classes use interfaces. You can't call ToList in a loop cause it has different signature in different classes. You can create ToList that returns objects rather than specific type.

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Sure they do: "//(where OtherObjectA implements IOtherObjects)" –  Frank Krueger Sep 10 '08 at 4:45
    
They do what? MyObjectA and MyObjectB are different classes. ToList is a part of abstract class. Please read question carefully before making such comments. –  aku Sep 10 '08 at 4:53
    
Ahh, I misread your MyObjectsA as OtherObjectA. Apologies. –  Frank Krueger Sep 10 '08 at 5:24
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You can still probably access the ToList() method, but since you are unsure of the type, won't this work?

foreach(var myObject in myObjectsList)
    foreach(var obj in myObject.ToList())
        //do something

Of course this will only work on C# 3.0.

Note that the use of var is merely to remove the requirement of knowing what type the lists contain; as opposed to Frank's comments that I have delusions that var will make typing dynamic.

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var isn't magical. You can do this just as well in C# 2.0. Ask the for the type of myObject and obj and you'll see they're nothing special. var is not dynamic - it is static. –  Frank Krueger Sep 10 '08 at 4:32
    
It is, but it removes the requirement for you to specify the type that you need, as opposed to typing MyObjectA myObject in myObjectsList. –  Jon Limjap Sep 10 '08 at 4:34
    
Jon, nice trick, I completely forgot about var :) –  aku Sep 10 '08 at 4:56
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OK, I am confused, the following code works fine for me (curiosity got the better of me!):

// Original Code Snipped for Brevity - See Edit History if Req'd

Or have I missed something?

Update Following Response from OP

OK now I am really confused.. What you are saying is that you want to get a List of Typed values from a generic/abstract List? (the child classes therefore become irrelevant).

You cannot return a Typed List if the Types are children/interface implementors - they do not match! You can of course get a List of items that are of a specific type from the abstract List like so:

    public List<OfType> TypedList<OfType>() where OfType : IOtherObjects
    {
        List<OfType> rtn = new List<OfType>();

        foreach (IOtherObjects o in _objects)
        {
            Type objType = o.GetType();
            Type reqType = typeof(OfType);

            if (objType == reqType)
                rtn.Add((OfType)o);
        }

        return rtn;
    }

If I am still off-base here can you please reword your question?! (It doesn't seem like I am the only one unsure of what you are driving at). I am trying to establish if there is a misunderstanding of generics on your part.

Another Update :D

Right, so it looks like you want/need the option to get the typed List, or the base list yes?

This would make your abstract class look like this - you can use ToList to get the concrete type, or ToBaseList() to get a List of the interface type. This should work in any scenarios you have. Does that help?

public abstract class MyObjects<T> where T : IOtherObjects
{
    List<T> _objects = new List<T>();

    public List<T> ToList()
    {
        return _objects;
    }

    public List<IOtherObjects> ToBaseList()
    {
        List<IOtherObjects> rtn = new List<IOtherObjects>();
        foreach (IOtherObjects o in _objects)
        {
            rtn.Add(o);
        }
        return rtn;
    }
}

Update #3

It's not really a "cludgy" workaround (no disrespect taken) - thats the only way to do it.. I think the bigger issue here is a design/grok problem. You said you had a problem, this code solves it. But if you were expecting to do something like:

public abstract class MyObjects<T> where T : IOtherObjects
{
    List<T> _objects = new List<T>();

    public List<IOtherObjects> Objects
    { get { return _objects; } }
}
#warning This won't compile, its for demo's sake.

And be able to pick-and-choose the types that come out of it, how else could you do it?! I get the feeling you do not really understand what the point of generics are, and you are trying to get them to do something they are not designed for!?

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His concern (I thought) was when he had a collection of MyObject<?>s, not a single MyObject<Whatever>. –  Frank Krueger Sep 10 '08 at 5:26
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I have recently found the

List<A>.Cast<B>().ToList<B>()

pattern.

It does exactly what I was looking for,

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Generics are used for static time type checks not runtime dispatch. Use inheritance/interfaces for runtime dispatch, use generics for compile-time type guarantees.

interface IMyObjects : IEnumerable<IOtherObjects> {}
abstract class MyObjects<T> : IMyObjects where T : IOtherObjects {}

IEnumerable<IMyObjects> objs = ...;
foreach (IMyObjects mo in objs) {
    foreach (IOtherObjects oo in mo) {
        Console.WriteLine(oo);
    }
}

(Obviously, I prefer Enumerables over Lists.)

OR Just use a proper dynamic language like VB. :-)

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