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Can somebody explain to me why the following code:

  var a = 0xFFFFFFFF;
  a &= 0xFFFFFFFF;
  a += 1;
  alert( "a = " + a );

  var b = 0xFFFFFFFF;
  b += 1;
  alert( "b = " + b );

returns different values for a and b?

Since 0xFFFFFFFF & 0xFFFFFFFF should equal 0xFFFFFFFF, both pieces of code should return 0x100000000. Instead a get the value of 0 and b get the value of 0x100000000.

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Regarding your last question -- just add b &= 0xFFFFFFFF before b += 1! –  Sven Marnach Mar 17 '11 at 13:20
    
BTW, what are the results you get for a and b? –  Sven Marnach Mar 17 '11 at 13:21
    
I shouldn't have to though since 0xFFFFFFFF & 0xFFFFFFFF = 0xFFFFFFFF. They should be the exact same value both times. –  Sparafusile Mar 17 '11 at 13:22
    
I'm getting 0 for a and 0x100000000 for b. –  Sparafusile Mar 17 '11 at 13:22

3 Answers 3

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Since JavaScript works with signed integers, 4294967295 can't be represented in 32 bits, thus it is converted to a wider type.

var a = 0xFFFFFFFF;
alert("a = " + a);  // gives 4294967295 (too large for a signed 32-bit integer)

a &= 0xFFFFFFFF;    // gives result as 32 bit signed integer
alert("a = " + a);  // gives -1

Details on the bitwise operators can be found here: Mozilla Developer Network: Bitwise Operators

If you initialize a to 0xFFFFFFF (thats 7 Fs) you get the expected result.

var a = 0xFFFFFFF;
alert("a = " + a);   // gives 268435455
a &= 0xFFFFFFFF;
alert("a = " + a);   // gives 268435455
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0xFFFFFFFF isn't too large for a 32-bit integer. It is the largest value a 32-bit integer can hold. –  Sparafusile Mar 17 '11 at 13:30
    
Right. Just updated my answer with respect to that. –  aioobe Mar 17 '11 at 13:31
    
It still doesn't make sense. 0xFFFFFFFF is a 32-bit integer which is displayed as 4294967295. I then perform a bitwise operator using another 32-bit integer as the second operand. Both are converted to an array of bits to do the and-ing. The result is displayed as a signed integer (-1). Nothing has changed except the way the number is displayed? Why convert an array of bits to a signed integer before doing a bitwise operation? You gave me the answer to my question, but several more questions to ask. –  Sparafusile Mar 17 '11 at 13:40
    
Right. 0xFFFFFFFF is not a 32-bit signed integer integer, but a wider type that can handle such large numbers. The result from a bitwise and, however, is a 32-bit signed integer. –  aioobe Mar 17 '11 at 13:46

JS bitwise operators return a signed 32-bit integer. 0xFFFFFFFF gets converted to -1, and adding 1 gives 0.

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That makes sense. I guess I shouldn't assume that all JavaScript variables are 64-bit. –  Sparafusile Mar 17 '11 at 13:32
    
JavaScript doesn't actually have integers. It just has numbers, which are implemented as doubles, hence limited to 53 bits of precision (the other 11 bits are used for the exponent). I've gotten bitten by that fact while querying a database that used 64-bit integers as unique identifiers. –  dan04 Mar 17 '11 at 13:40

Try this:

var a = 0xFFFFFFFF;
alert( "a = " + a );
a &= 0xFFFFFFFF;
alert( "a = " + a );
a += 1;
alert( "a = " + a );

and it should be a little more apparent what's going on. The &= is causing a type conversion that doesn't happen for b.

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