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Why does the code below gives EXC_BAD_ACCESS, could not access memory?

int combine_strings(char **outputStr,...)
{
    va_list ap;
    char *s, *out=0;
    int len=0;

    va_start(ap,outputStr);
    while(s=va_arg(ap,char *))
    {
      len+=strlen(s);
    }
    va_end(ap);


    if(!(out=malloc(len+1)))
        exit(1);

    *outputStr=out;

    va_start(ap,outputStr);
    while(s=va_arg(ap,char *))
    {
      len=strlen(s);
      memcpy(out,s,len);
      out+=len;
    }
    va_end(ap);

    *out=0;

    return 0;
}
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5  
How do you call it? –  Erik Mar 17 '11 at 13:31

4 Answers 4

up vote 8 down vote accepted

I have to disagree with the other previous posters. The original code does not iterate over the same va_list twice. It creates two different ones and iterates over each of them in turn, even though the same variable is used to hold both lists.

In fact, I managed to run the function properly. Hence, my guess is that the problem is in how the function was called. Here is how I called it, note the trailing NULL and the setup of the output parameter:

#include <stdio.h>
#include <stdarg.h>
#include <stdlib.h>
#include <string.h>

// ... combine_strings() goes here...
int main()
{
  char * res;
  char * * output = &res;
  combine_strings(output, "FOO", "BAR", "BAZ", NULL);
  printf("%s\n", *output);
}

The code above outputs FOOBARBAZ as expected.

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+1: The standard (7.15.1.4) specifically says "The va_start macro initializes ap for subsequent use by va_arg and va_end." –  pmg Mar 17 '11 at 14:14
    
You are correct! It had issue with the way it was called. it would give segmentation fault if we pass ZERO instead of NULL as last argument. if we pass 0 then we should typecast it to (void*)0, I was passing a 0, and hence it gave segmentation fault. –  PowerPC Mar 18 '11 at 4:20
    
If a pointer is larger than a plain int, then that would account for the need of the explicit pointer cast, or NULL. ps. Don't forget to mark one of the answers as accepted when you are satisfied. –  Lindydancer Mar 18 '11 at 7:02

You cannot iterate over the same va_list twice. You need to create a copy using va_copy().

int combine_strings(char **outputStr,...)
{
    va_list ap, ap2;
    char *s, *out=0;
    int len=0;

    va_start(ap,outputStr);
    va_copy(ap2, ap);
    while(s=va_arg(ap2,char *))
    {
      len+=strlen(s);
    }
    va_end(ap2);


    if(!(out=malloc(len+1)))
        exit(1);

    *outputStr=out;

    while(s=va_arg(ap,char *))
    {
      len=strlen(s);
      memcpy(out,s,len);
      out+=len;
    }
    va_end(ap);

    *out=0;

    return 0;
}
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Using va_start twice in one function is difficult to get to work on all platforms. See here for more information.

Probably best to use va_copy.

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The link you provide as a reference describes a completely different problem than "using va_start twice in one function". –  Heath Hunnicutt Mar 17 '11 at 17:18

The easy way to answer this kind of question is to run it in a debugger. You'll get a full stack trace, code pointer, and you'll be able to look at the values of all the variables.

To use gdb, first compile the program with debugging symbols (-g in gcc). Then, run it:

gdb program_name
(gdb) run

It will crash and you'll be able to see why.

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