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So, say I have the following enum declaration:

public class WatchService implements Runnable
{
    private State state;

    private enum State
    {
        FINDING_MANIFEST, FINDING_FILES, SENDING_FILES, WAITING_TO_FINISH
    };
    // other stuff
}

Now, say I have the following abstract class:

public abstract class MyOtherAbstractClass extends MyAbstractClass
{
    // other stuff
    private WatchService watchService;
    // other stuff
}

Now, say I have the following class that extends the aforementioned abstract class:

public class MyClass extends MyOtherAbstractClass
{
    // other stuff
}

If I have several instances of MyClass, will they all share the current State value? For instance, if one instance declares state = State.FINDING_MANIFEST;, will all instances have the current state of FINDING_MANIFEST?

I hope this makes sense..

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3 Answers 3

up vote 4 down vote accepted

If "state" is static, then yes. Otherwise no.

Change to:

private static State state;

This makes state shared among all instances of your class.

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Are enums static by default? If so, that would implicitly make state static, right? –  mre Mar 17 '11 at 14:57
1  
@DLK - Why would a variable containing an enum be static by default? It's the same as any other variable. –  Brian Roach Mar 17 '11 at 14:59
    
I must have implemented it incorrectly the first time, since I was experiencing this at one point following this. I probably did something quirky, but I wanted to ask you guys for further clarification. –  mre Mar 17 '11 at 15:03
1  
@DLK: I think you mix up that instance stuff. Instances of the enum (which are the constants like SENDING_FILES) are shared (because they only exist once), but not the variables that hold these instances. –  f1sh Mar 17 '11 at 15:14

No. state is a instance variable. Each instantiated object has its own.

If you defined it as

private static State state;

Then there would only be a single instance of it, and all instances of the class would see the same one.

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If I understand the question correctly, this isn't specific to enums. Imagine the same situation using a private String state = "FINDING_MANIFEST";. Unless state is static, it won't be shared among instances.

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