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Now I have a really tricky thing with Oracle execution plans running havoc, when I use a DETERMINISTIC function on the right hand side of the LIKE operator. This is my situation:

The Situation

I thought it to be wise to execute a query like this (simplified):

SELECT [...]
FROM customers cust
JOIN addresses addr ON addr.cust_id = cust.id
WHERE special_char_filter(cust.surname) like special_char_filter(?)

And I would bind ? to something like 'Eder%'. Now customers and addresses are very large tables. That's why it's important to use indexes. Of course, there is a regular index on addresses.cust_id. But I have also created a function-based index on special_char_filter(customers.surname), which works quite nicely.

The Trouble

The trouble is, the above query involving a like clause creates execution plans with FULL TABLE SCANS on addresses. It looks like something in this query keeps Oracle from using indexes on addresses.cust_id.

The Workaround

I found out, that the solution to my problem is this:

SELECT [...]
FROM customers cust
JOIN addresses addr ON addr.cust_id = cust.id
WHERE special_char_filter(cust.surname) like ?

I removed the (DETERMINISTIC !) function from the like operator's right hand side and pre-calculated the bind variable in Java. Now this query is hyper-fast, without any FULL TABLE SCANS. This, too, is very fast (although not equivalent):

SELECT [...]
FROM customers cust
JOIN addresses addr ON addr.cust_id = cust.id
WHERE special_char_filter(cust.surname) = special_char_filter(?)

The Confusion

I don't understand this. What's wrong with having deterministic functions on the right hand side of the like operator? I have observed this in Oracle 11.2.0.1.0

share|improve this question
    
oracle versions are very important for this type of questions. What is the Oracle rdbms version? –  ik_zelf Mar 17 '11 at 16:01
    
I have closely observed this problem in version 11.2.0.1.0. It's probable, thought, that it also appears in a 10g version. I cannot formally confirm that, though –  Lukas Eder Mar 17 '11 at 16:08

3 Answers 3

up vote 1 down vote accepted

The script below shows the steps I used to get an index range scan on the ADDRESSES index. Before you look at the details, you may want to just run the whole thing. If you don't get two index range scans for the last two queries then it's probably a difference in our versions, settings, etc. I'm using 10.2.0.1.0.

If you do see the desired plan, then you may want to gradually modify my script to make it more accurately reflect the real data, and try to find the exact change that makes it break. Hopefully my setup is at least close to the real thing, and isn't missing any details that would make it irrelevant to your exact problem.

This is a weird issue, and I don't understand everything that's going on here. For example, I don't know why use_nl works but index hints don't.

(Note that my execution times are based on repeated executions. The first time you run this some queries may be slower because the data isn't cached.)

--create tables
create table customers (id number, surname varchar2(100), other varchar2(100));
create table addresses (cust_id number, other varchar2(100));

--create data and indexes
insert into customers select level, 'ASDF'||level, level from dual connect by level <= 1000000;
insert into addresses select level, level from dual connect by level <= 1000000;
create index customers_id on customers(id);
create index addresses_cust_id on addresses(cust_id);
create index customers_special_char_filter on customers(special_char_filter(surname));

--create function
create or replace function special_char_filter(surname in varchar) return varchar2 deterministic is
begin
    return replace(surname, 'bad value!', null);
end;
/

--gather stats
begin
    dbms_stats.gather_table_stats(ownname => user, tabname => 'CUSTOMERS', cascade => true);
    dbms_stats.gather_table_stats(ownname => user, tabname => 'ADDRESSES', cascade => true);
end;
/

set autotrace on;

--Index range scan on CUSTOMERS_SPECIAL_CHAR_FILTER, but full table scan on ADDRESSES
--(0.2 seconds)
SELECT *
FROM customers cust
JOIN addresses addr ON addr.cust_id = cust.id
WHERE special_char_filter(cust.surname) like special_char_filter('ASDF100000bad value!%');

--This uses the addresses index but it does an index full scan.  Not really what we want.
--I'm not sure why I can't get an index range scan here.
--Various other index hints also failed here.  For example, no_index_ffs won't stop an index full scan.
--(1 second)
SELECT /*+ index(addr addresses_cust_id) */ *
FROM customers cust
JOIN addresses addr ON addr.cust_id = cust.id
WHERE special_char_filter(cust.surname) like special_char_filter('ASDF100000bad value!%');


--Success!  With this hint both indexes are used and it's super-fast.
--(0.02 seconds)
SELECT /*+ use_nl(cust addr) */ *
FROM customers cust
JOIN addresses addr ON addr.cust_id = cust.id
WHERE special_char_filter(cust.surname) like special_char_filter('ASDF100000bad value!%');


--But forcing the index won't always be a good idea, for example when the value starts with '%'.
--(1.2 seconds)
SELECT /*+ use_nl(cust addr) */ *
FROM customers cust
JOIN addresses addr ON addr.cust_id = cust.id
WHERE special_char_filter(cust.surname) like special_char_filter('%ASDF100000bad value!%');
share|improve this answer
    
sorry I didn't get any notification about your answer. Looks like a good benchmark. On the other hand, you inlined your string literals and didn't use bind variables, which may cause some of the issues due to bind variable peeking. I'm still confused about these things... –  Lukas Eder Apr 13 '11 at 15:23
    
I checked your script. Funny enough, the last statement is generally the fastest in my DB, even with a leading %. On the other hand, the rows estimate is generally quite off compared to the actual rows in the query execution plans, when using the /*+ use_nl */ hint... –  Lukas Eder Apr 13 '11 at 15:44
    
I'll accept your answer, as it comes closest to any solution. –  Lukas Eder Apr 13 '11 at 15:45

It might be nothing in the query at all. The cost-based optimizer might just be confused and think that a FULL TABLE SCAN is faster. Have you tried using a HINT on the query, forcing Oracle to use your index?

share|improve this answer
    
Yes I have tried pretty much every hint that I have found here: psoug.org/reference/hints.html, without any success. No index was ever used for the JOIN. But I'm confused that Oracle wouldn't realise that calculating special_char_filter(?) just once before calculating the execution plan would do the trick... Technically, special_char_filter(?) is a constant. –  Lukas Eder Mar 17 '11 at 16:24
    
@Lukas Eder: Have you tried /*+ use_nl(cust addr) */? None of the index hints helped, but use_nl worked for me. –  Jon Heller Mar 18 '11 at 4:47
    
Hmm, I hadn't tried that. But why do you think a nested loop (rather than a hash join) will force using the index? Note, there is also /*+ use_nl_using_index(...) */, which didn't work for me –  Lukas Eder Mar 18 '11 at 7:16
    
Hmm, /*+ use_nl */ didn't work either. The nested loop is not applied, I still get a hash join with a full table scan... It's really twisted. –  Lukas Eder Mar 18 '11 at 8:18

The problem is that Oracle doesn't know what "special_char_filter(?)" will return. If it returns a '%', then it will be very slow to use an index as everything would match. If it returns a 'A%' it will probably also be slow as (assuming an equal distribution across all the letters) about 4% of the rows would match. If it returns a '%FRED%', it wouldn't return a lot of rows, but a using an index range scan would perform poorly because the rows may be at the start, middle or end of the index, so it has to do the entire index.

If you know that special_char_filter will always return a string that has at least three 'solid' characters at the start, then you will probably have better luck with

SELECT [...] FROM customers cust JOIN addresses addr ON addr.cust_id = cust.id WHERE special_char_filter(cust.surname) like special_char_filter(?) AND substr(special_char_filter(cust.surname),1,3) = substr(special_char_filter(?),1,3)

with a FBI on substr(special_char_filter(cust.surname),1,3)

Though if pre-calculating the result in java works, then stick with it.

Apart from that, I'd probably look at Oracle Text for matches.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks for your input. Unfortunately, I don't know the contents of ? as this is user input. I just thought there must be some way Oracle can calculate the result of that function before calculating the execution plan. Oracle Text will be introduced very soon. I'm hoping that this will resolve all my problems! :-) –  Lukas Eder Mar 18 '11 at 7:12
    
you're using a prepared statement - those are quite useful to, well, prepare the execution plan once, and run many times. Have you tried with a plain statement (not prepared)? –  Mat Mar 18 '11 at 7:23
    
@Mat, you're right. That makes sense, I hadn't thought of that. A "plain statement" is not an option in our architecture, though. But I tested the "plain statement" against the database directly, using Toad (where I ran my execution plan analyses). It didn't change anything, actually. –  Lukas Eder Mar 18 '11 at 8:20

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