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I have a program that selects from about 200 tables with prefix. eg PBN_products, PBN_address, PBN_others. Instead of appending the prefix on each table for the select statement, is there a way of defining the prefix as default value and do the selection?

$prefix=GET['prefix'];
mysql_connect(DB_SERVER, DB_SERVER_USERNAME, DB_SERVER_PASSWORD);
mysql_select_db(DB_DATABASE);
$sql = 'SELECT price, description, title, cost'.
        'FROM products, address, others';

How can I define the prefix not to include in all tables? I have 200 tables.

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1  
Is this code you already have and have to deal with, or are you talking about writing sql going forward? –  Jage Mar 17 '11 at 15:08
1  
This a really unorthodox method of modeling data. Do you maybe think it's possible that you're doing something wrong? –  arnorhs Mar 17 '11 at 15:14
    
I'd close this question for being not real. I doubt thre is a price field in address table. –  Your Common Sense Mar 17 '11 at 15:33
1  
Is it 300, about 200 or 200 tables ;) –  Unreason Mar 17 '11 at 15:56

4 Answers 4

up vote 1 down vote accepted

I would look into a class to do some simple query abstraction or some kind of ORM lib that does this. A sample would be like this.

class Query {
    function from($tbl){
        return new Table($tbl);
    }
}
class Table {
    var $prefix = 'PBN_';
    var $tblname = '';

    function Table($name){
        $this->tblname = $this->prefix.$name;
    }
    function select($cols, $where = false, $order = false, $limit = false){
        $query = "SELECT {$cols} FROM {$this->tblname}";
        if($where) $query .= " WHERE ".$where; //add where
        if($order) $query .= " ORDER BY ".$order; //add order
        if($limit) $query .= " LIMIT ".$limit; //add limit
        return $query;
    }
}

$q = new Query;
$results = mysql_query($q->from('products')->select('*'));

This is obviously nowhere near complete or secure. Just a sample of how an abstraction class could speed up your sql and do you your prefixes for you.

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You could define an array with the table names, and loop through that array. When you append the array item to the string, put "PBN_" hardcoded in front of that name.

$arr = array("products","address","others");
$sql = "SELECT price, description, title, cost FROM ";
foreach ($arr as $tablename) {
    $sql = $sql . "PBN_" . $tablename . ", ";
}
$sql = substr($sql, 0, -2); // Remove last comma

You can then add all the tablenames to the array, and the prefix will automatically be added.

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How about something like this?

 $prefix = GET['prefix'];

// add prefix to table names
foreach (array("products", "address", "others") as &$table) 
{
    $table = $prefix.$table;
}

mysql_connect(DB_SERVER, DB_SERVER_USERNAME, DB_SERVER_PASSWORD);
mysql_select_db(DB_DATABASE);

$sql = 'SELECT price, description, title, cost'.
       'FROM '.$table[0].', '.$table[1].', '.$table[2];
share|improve this answer

You could do something like this?

$prefix = '';
if(isset($_GET['prefix'])){
    $prefix = mysql_real_escape_string(stripslashes($_GET['prefix']));
}

$sql = "SELECT price, description, title, cost 
           FROM {$prefix}products, {$prefix}address, {$prefix}others";

EDIT: I agree on the comments that this is bad practice... An alternative would be to store the prefixes in another table and pass an ID of that table in the GET. This would make you less vulnarable to SQL injections.

$prefix = "";
if(isset($_GET['prefixid'])){
    $prefixid = mysql_real_escape_string(stripslashes($_GET['prefixid']));
    $query = "SELECT prefix FROM prefixes WHERE prefixid = $prefixid";
    $result = mysql_query($query);
    $prefix = mysql_result($result, 0, 0);
}
$sql = "SELECT price, description, title, cost 
           FROM {$prefix}products, {$prefix}address, {$prefix}others";
share|improve this answer
3  
SQL injection is a thing to be avoided, son –  Your Common Sense Mar 17 '11 at 15:34
1  
I agree, I would strongly recommend against passing a DB table prefix around through the GET. –  Jage Mar 17 '11 at 15:46

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