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Everything I have ever been told is that go to's are evil and stay away from them, but I think they may help me here (?). I would like to provide the user an option to restart the application when an exception is caught and am having a bit of trouble wrapping my head around what to do...

My application will be monitored by another process, but there are some exceptions where I want to the user to be able to decide what to do without returning control to the calling process.

Is something like this "acceptable"? Any other suggestions?

Thanks so much!

int main(){

    initialize:
       try{
        //do things
       }
       catch(...)
       {
          cout<<"Would you like to try initializing again?"<<endl;

          //if yes
            goto initialize;

          //if not
          abort(); //or something...
        }

return 0;
}
share|improve this question
4  
This furious hatred of goto is bizarre. I'm guessing it's the same people who scream premature optimization on every post about optimization. – Inverse Mar 17 '11 at 17:39
1  
@Inverse: It's not our fault that 95% of the posts about optimization are premature (i.e., before the "measure" in "measure, optimize, measure"). But isn't that a bit OT? ;-) – DevSolar Mar 17 '11 at 18:07

Why not like this?

while(true){
  //Do stuff
  if(exit){
    break;
  }
}

or

continue = true;
do{
  //Do stuff
  if(exit){
    continue = false;
  }
}while(continue);
share|improve this answer
    
+1, this is the way, no goto needed. – murrekatt Mar 17 '11 at 15:36
    
How would you get back into the while loop if needed? Also, what are the implications on try/catch? I'm planning on catching many different types of exceptions and need to give the user options on what to do... – JonnyK Mar 17 '11 at 15:41
2  
@Jon, if you need to jump in and out of the loop, then you have to seperate it in it's own function, then just call the function when you need it. – Mārtiņš Briedis Mar 17 '11 at 15:46
    
@Briedis I'd still like the function/loop to be in a try block. If I call the function/loop again from inside the catch, it won't be in a try anymore, right? – JonnyK Mar 17 '11 at 15:50
1  
I don't like the break in the first example. (It's a poorly disguised goto.) The second example is a bit better, but looks rather contrived, what with using that continue flag (bad boy, a keyword as identifier) in three places when returning from an encapsuling function would do nicely. – DevSolar Mar 17 '11 at 16:09

you could try :

int main()
{
     while(true)
     {
          try
          {
               program();
          }
          catch(std::exception& e)
          {
               std::cout << "Start again?" << std::endl;
               //Check ...
               if(!go_on)
                    break;
          }
     }
     return 0;
}
share|improve this answer

A goto can always be avoided, giving cleaner code.

By the way, the same goes for breaks outside a switch. The continue keyword is marginally less condemnable, because at least it honors the enclosing loop's condition.

It is important to catch exceptions at the right place - where you can handle the condition most effectively.

And if a condition turns out to be inconvenient (like the "try again?" in my case), consider negating it ("fail?") for cleaner structure.

// Tries until successful, or user interaction demands failure.
bool initialize() {
    for ( ;; ) {
        try {
            // init code
            return true;
        }
        catch ( ... ) {
            cout << "Init Failed. Fail Program?" << endl;
            if ( yes ) {
                return false;
            }
        }
    }
}

int main() {
    if ( ! initialize() ) {
        return EXIT_FAILURE;
    }
    // rest of program
    return EXIT_SUCCESS;
}

Notes: This does not use goto or break, and it does not recurse (especially not from within a catch block).

share|improve this answer
2  
finally someone gets it right +1 – Paul Mar 17 '11 at 15:50
    
An early return is just a goto in disguise? Just kidding! – Bo Persson Mar 17 '11 at 16:20
    
@Bo Persson: Try drawing a Nassi-Shneiderman diagram of my early return vs. the break solutions I critizised as gotos in disguise. You will see the difference: An early return leaves the whole block, while a break tries to jump to a different position in the block. No kidding. ;-) – DevSolar Mar 17 '11 at 16:22

Yes, technically it is okay, but usual "goto considered harmful" considerations apply.

share|improve this answer
2  
goto is never ok - avoid it like the plague. It will bite you when you have a bug later on. Don't ever consider it even. – Paul Mar 17 '11 at 15:39
4  
@Paul: Do you have a comparison of how many people plague killed and how many people use of goto killed? – sharptooth Mar 17 '11 at 15:41
3  
goto is OK. It is the simplest possible flow control mechanism, and finding the jump target is simpler than pretty much any other. If it avoids repetition, then there is no problem with it; in C++, it is pretty much impossible to tie yourself up in knots using goto because you can't actually go anywhere so confusingly far enough away that it might cause a problem that you don't have already. – please delete me Mar 17 '11 at 15:44
2  
Watch which answer comes out on top in a month. If there are enough of you still using goto to bump up your answer I will be disappointed. – Paul Mar 17 '11 at 15:57
2  
Seconded. Geez, half a decade of computing, and people still defend goto as a valid coding practice. No wonder so much software still sucks in spades. – DevSolar Mar 17 '11 at 15:59

The original quote was (I believe) "uncontrolled use of goto considered harmful". Gotos can be useful, but must be used in a controlled fashion. There is one programming technique, to create reentrant subroutines, dependent on the state of the program or data, that positively demands directed jumps. Though this technique may well be considered old fashioned, I understand that it is still used, but is hidden by more modern language and compiler features. The point of the control is that you must stop and ask yourself, not just "is there a more structured way of doing the same thing" - @Justin - but also "under what specific conditions will I use a goto?" Being convenient is probably not a sufficient condition to use it, without this wider answer.

share|improve this answer
2  
The catch is that some of us have been programming for decades, without finding those "specific conditions" even once. They must be very rare! – Bo Persson Mar 17 '11 at 16:24
    
The approach that used this approach substantially was Jackson Structured Programming. The technique was to design independent, communicating programs, and then "invert" one of the programs to become a reentrant, stateful series of subroutines. This could only be done by writing the called program with loop free code - and the way to derive loop free code was to replace loop constructs with gotos. This was done automatically by the preprocessor for (at least) C, Pascal, and Cobol. This approach was extensively used in the UK and Scandinavia, in many private, government and military projects. – Chris Walton Mar 17 '11 at 17:01
    
Ok, using machine generated code with gotos is similar to the compiler generating jmp for break and continue. I have just never written any gotos myself, and not even been close. – Bo Persson Mar 17 '11 at 17:20

Normal way of handling exceptions is at the place where you can do something. It is obvious that the place you are trying to handle them is not right, since you have to use goto.

So, something like this :

void mainLoop() // get user settings, process, etc
{
   try
   {
     // 1) get user settings
     // 2) process data
     // 3) inform of the result
   }
   catch( const exception_type & e)
   {
     // inform of the error
   }      
}

int main()
{
  try
  {
    while(true)
      mainLoop();
  }
  catch(...)
  {
    std::cout<<"an unknown exception caught... aborting() " << std::endl;
  }
}
share|improve this answer
    
but if you restart the mainLoop() it will be outside of a try block, will it not? – JonnyK Mar 17 '11 at 15:45
    
@Jon Right, I fixed the example – BЈовић Mar 17 '11 at 15:57

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